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J/Boats Historical Sailing Highlights

2017
The debut of the new J/121 Offshore Speedster was met with critical acclaim and tremendous enthusiasm from the marketplace.  A “revolutionary” boat from the J/Design team produced a unique concept for offshore sailing that was the “right boat at the right time”.  With crew limited to five or less people, water-ballasted, and with all sail-handling systems designed for double-handing, experienced offshore sailors welcomed the simplicity and minimizing logistical challenges associated with 40 footers. The J/121 was awarded SAIL Magazine’s Best Boat “Performance 30 to 40 Feet” category as well as SAILING WORLD’s Boat of the Year “Best Crossover” boat category. The Women’s Keelboat Worlds were again sailed in J/70s, this time in the mountains west of Mexico City on beautiful Valle de Bravo; meanwhile the J/70 Worlds were hosted by YC Costa Smeralda and sailed off Porto Cervo, Sardinia, Italy- the world’s largest sportboat fleet ever with 165 boats registered.  The J/70 Europeans were sailed on the Solent in England, with Italy’s famous woman skipper- Claudia Rossi winning for the second time (she previously won in Kiel, Germany).  The J/70 “sailing leagues” continued to grow and expand in Europe and across the Continent. The J/111s held their fourth World Championship on San Francisco Bay, sailing in epic Bay conditions on the Berkeley Circle and hosted by St Francis YC. Notably, the J/97E won her class in the British J/Cup, in the Round Island Race, Cowes Week, and the Hamble Winter Series.  Also, the J/112E continued here winning ways, taking 2nd in SPI OUEST France, winning J/Cup IRC 1 Class and also the Hamble Winter Series IRC 1 Class by a convincing margin. The J/88s grew as a one-design class in the USA and the United Kingdom.  With spirited racing on both side of the Atlantic.

2016
The debut of the new J/112E Grand Prix Sport Cruiser saw her win class at SPI Ouest France Regatta in La Trinite sur Mer, France and the famous Grand Prix du Crouesty.  J/112E also won SAIL Magazine’s “Best Performance Boat Over 30 Ft” and won SAILING WORLD’s Boat of the Year “Best Crossover Boat Category”. The introduction of the J/122E version of the famous J/122 was also met with critical acclaim.  Plus, she also performed on the water, winning the Dutch Double-handed Championship as well as taking 2nd in the RORC Fastnet Race Doublehanded Class.  Yes, it is possible to marry comfort with speed as the Dutch AJETO team proved over the course of a season of sailing offshore.  Out West in America, the J/122E JOYRIDE also garnered her fair share of silverware in major offshore races in the Pacific Northwest. J/Boats co-founders, Bob and Rod Johnstone, were honored by the Mystic Seaport Museum- garnering the “American & the Sea Award”; they were also honored by the USA National Sailing Hall of Fame as 2016 inductees. The J/70 phenomenon continued, with growing momentum in places like South America (Chile, Argentina, Brazil) and in Europe, especially.  The “sailing league” concept has now taken over the Continent- with over 100+ events taking place in Finland, Sweden, Norway, Switzerland, Russia, Denmark, The Netherlands, England, France, Italy, Germany, and Monaco…500+ sailing clubs participate with over 5,000 sailors.  The J/70s held their third World Championship on breezy, cool San Francisco Bay, hosted by St Francis YC. The Women’s Keelboat Worlds were hosted for the first time in J/70s on western Long Island Sound, hosted by American YC in Rye, New York. A number of J/teams participate in the first two yacht races to Havana, Cuba- one from Miami, the other from Key West, Florida. J/111s held their third World Championship on the Solent, hosted by the Island Sailing Club in Cowes, England- a very windy series.  The J/88 class continued to evolve with great racing at Key West, Youngstown’s CanAm Regatta, AYC Spring/Fall Series, Block Island, Charleston Race Week, and their first North American Championship at American YC in Rye, NY.

2015  
The J/70 explosion continues with 900+ boats delivered worldwide by year-end, and the first Worlds in European waters (LaRochelle, FRA). The Sailing League phenomenon spreads across Europe, featuring the J/70, and culminates in the Champions League finale held at Yacht Club Costa Smeralda in Porto Cervo, Italy. The J/111 Class celebrates its 2nd World Championship in Newport, RI and 25% of the world’s J/111s attend.  George Gamble and teamaboard My Sharona prevail in the 25 boat fleet. The new J/11S, a purpose-built 36’ double-handed, offshore racer is launching in LaRochelle, France. J/122 “Artie” wins second Rolex Middle Sea Race in a row this time it’s Class 5 and both IRC and ORC.  J/122 has now won it’s class three years in a row. The J/88 class kicks off with racing at Key West, Hamble, UK and the inaugural Great Lakes and New England Championship held in Youngstown, NY and Greenwich, CT respectively. The first ever electric powered J/Boat is launched with the J/88 Oceanvolt SEA at the Newport Boat Show along with the brand new J/122E and J/97E built by J/Composites.  The new "E" range with brighter interiors and modern styling is joined by the all-new 36' J/112E sport cruiser launched in November and sea-trialed in Narragansett Bay. 

2014   
J/122 “Artie” wins Rolex Middle Sea Race Overall in both IRC and ORC.  Sistership J/122 Otra Vez follows up 2013 win with a second in class. The J/88 wins Sailing World’s Boat of the Year “Best Overall One-Design” and one week later is announced as Yachts & Yachting Boat of the Year at the London Boatshow.  J/88 is the January cover girl for Sailing World Magazine and   production begins in France to meet demand in Europe. The new International J/111 Class holds its first ever World Championship in Cowes, England and hosted by the Royal Yacht Squadron. J/70 growth explodes at the grass roots level with fleets developing across the USA, Europe, South America and elsewhere. By year end over 700 J/70s are sailing worldwide with event highlights including the Sportboat Winter Series at the Monaco Yacht Club, a new European J/70 Circuit, the North Americans at Rochester Yacht Club, and the inaugural World Championship in Newport, Rhode Island. J/70 production for the Asian market begins at McConaghy Boats in China. J/70 is awarded Sweden’s Boat of the Year by the Swedish yachting press.  German Sailing League takes off with the J/70 at the heart of this success.  Denmark follows suit with the Danish Sailing League. J/122 El Ocaso wins class at the Heineken Regatta and “Most Worthy Performance Overall” trophy. The new J/97E sport cruiser is introduced at the Southampton Show as a model year upgrade of the J/97 with a redesigned cockpit to accommodate a wheel option along with J/122E inspired styling. J/133 Wins the RORC Trans-Atlantic Race from the Canary Islands to Grenada in the Caribbean. The J/24 Worlds comes “home” to Newport, Rhode Island, site of the first Worlds held in 1979.  Will Wells of the USA prevails over 70 boats representing 12+ countries. Red Dragon Yachts of Xiamen, China begins J/80 production for the Asian market. The J/80 is the featured boat in the 2014 Inter-Collegiate Sailing Worlds in France and World Championship heads to Annapolis, MD in September.

2013
The J/70 hits center stage with an incredible 60 boats at it’s first Midwinter Championship in Key West, nine months after Hull #1 launched. J/70 is voted Best Performance Boat by Yachts and Yachting Magazine… “The Clear Winner” The J/70 is named European Yacht of the Year under the Special Yachts category, after swaying the judging panel with a flawless showing over several test days. 91 boats compete for first North American Championship in Annapolis with Heather Gregg Earl and her team winning against a very competitive fleet of sailors. J/70 Awarded International One Design Status by ISAF. Hugo Rocha of Portugal tops a 117 boat fleet to win the J/80 Worlds in Marseilles, France.  J/80 hull #1500 competes. The new 29’ J/88 Speedster is launched in late July. J/120 wins Pineapple Cup from Miami to Montego Bay Jamaica. J/97 one design action heats up in the UK and J/97 is class winner at RORC IRC Nationals and the 2013 Scottish Series. J/111 Class has break-out year with first Euro Cup held in La Trinite, France and first North American Championship in Chicago. J/122 “Otra Vez” & J/133 “Oiltanking Juno” win respective IRC classes at 2013 Rolex Middle Sea Race with J/133 taking first under ORC as well. The new J/122E Sport Cruiser debuts at Grand Pavois Boatshow in La Rochelle France. J/42 “CEOL MOR“ completes global circumnavigation.

2012
This year may well go down in history as one of J's better years on record. The big news was the successful launch of the J/70. The first pair of J/70s launched in March with a record number of 100+ boats ordered before its maiden voyage, a feat un-equalled in J/Boats history. And, it was chosen for New York Yacht Club's US Qualifying Series for a fleet of dozen boats, plus its second one-design regatta was held in Annapolis, MD with DIESEL winning over 24 other boats. By end of the year, over 300 boats are on order and 40 boats are sailing Key West Race Week in January 2013. J/111 is VOILES Magazine's BOAT OF THE YEAR 2012 and it's chosen YACHTS & YACHTING'S READER'S YACHT OF THE YEAR! J/111s win Sydney, Australia's Short Ocean Series (JAKE), take 2nd at Key West Race Week (MENTAL), win IRC class in Warsash Spring Series (J-DREAM), win IRC Class in North Sea Regatta (XCENTRIC RIPPER), are 1-2-3 in PHRF B in Charleston Race Week (WICKED 2.0/ FLEETWING/ VELOCITY), wins Marstrand Big Boat Race in IRC Class (BLUR), wins epic Round Island Race in IRC Class (J-DREAM), take 9 of top 10 in Chicago-Mackinac Race ORR Handicap OVERALL (first time ever by any class of boat) and KASHMIR is awarded the Mackinac Trophy as Overall Winner, wins Bayview-Mackinac Race PHRF C class (NO SURPRISE), wins Nova Scotia Opener Regatta in Halifax, wins Bayview Regatta in Detroit, wins Tri-State Race Overall (MENTAL), 1st overall PHRF Class in Chester Race Week- Nova Scotia (BLAST), is third overall in Tjorn-Runt Race in Sweden (BLUR III sailing in largest race in Sweden with 436 boats!), wins Nova Scotia Offshore Championship overall (BLAST) and wins Netherlands IRC Championship Overall (J-XCENTRIC RIPPER). J/111's sail one-design at SPI Ouest France Regatta, Cowes Race Week, Chicago-Mackinac Race, Verve Cup, Chicago SW NOOD Regatta, Annapolis SW NOOD Regatta, Ugotta Regatta/ Harbor Springs, Vice Admiral's Cup and GARMIN Hamble Winter Series. J/145 wins San Diego YC's "Yacht of the Year 2011" (BAD PAK) for her epic offshore racing success and takes PHRF A in the Newport-Ensenada Race (RADIO FLYER). J/133 JIVARO wins Tour de Belle'Ile off La Trinite sur Mer, France over 600+ boats and HOT WATER smokes IRC Canadian Championship. J/125s crush Puerto Vallarta and Cabo Races, DOUBLE TROUBLE "three-peats" Spinnaker Cup and Big Boat Series in San Francisco, California, and DOUBLE TROUBLE crushes TransPac Pacific Cup overall. J/122s continue to win, taking Key West Race Week PHRF A (TEAMWORK), wins Corsica Race in IRC (650nm sailed by CHRISTINA III), wins Block Island Race and STC Stamford-Vineyard Race (CHRISTOPHER DRAGON), takes 3rd in St Tropez 900 Race (900nm sailed by NOISY OYSTER), 1st & 2nd in US IRC Championships (WINGS & CHRIS DRAGON), 2nd class in RORC North Sea Race, win Rolex Middle Sea Race IRC Class (ARTIE RTFX) again, win Garmin Hamble Winter Series IRC 1 (JOLOU) and in Australia (LITHIUM). The J/120 EL OCASO does another "Caribbean Tour" and walks off with every major regatta, winning class at St Maarten, Rolex St Thomas, BVI and Antigua Race Weeks.  J/109s and J/105 sweep Round Ireland 700nm race overall and in IRC 3 class; sweep IRC 2 Class at CORK Week in Cork, Ireland; and sweep French Pornic Cup Race to Gijon, Spain. J/97s continue their winning ways, taking Warsash Spring Series IRC class, Cowes Week IRC Class, Scottish Race Week, 2nd in Garmin Hamble Winter Series, SAILING FOR JESUS wins class in the Hermano Runt in Sweden and KNOCKABOUT wins in Sydney, Australia. In the one-design world, the J/105 class continues to expand into South America and is growing in Chile with its first South American Championships off Algarrobo, Chile on the Pacific coast. And, J/105s had an unprecedented four regattas in a row in Southern California, with San Diego YC hosting the Southern California Championships, North American Championships, International Masters Championship and the Lipton Cup in October/November-- the first two events featured new J/105 owner- Mr America's Cup- Dennis Conner! The J/22 Worlds were sailed in Le Crouesty, France and won by a Frenchman (Jean Queveau) for the first time ever. The J/24 Worlds had a record turn-out in Rochester, New York (over 100 boats) with Brazilian Mauricio Santa Cruz winning an unprecedented fourth worlds (just one away from Ken Read's famous mark of five J/24 Worlds!). The J/80 Worlds were sailed in Dartmouth, England and the Spanish teams, yet again, sweep with Jose Maria van der Ploeg on NILFISK winning. The J/80s also hosted the World Police Sailing Championships in Hong Kong, China.

2011
As the world economy continued to bounce along and slowly improve, the prospects for J sailors continually improved.  The successful introduction of the J/111 led to world-acclaim and to some remarkable performances offshore.  For starters, the J/111 KONTIKI V wins Key West Race Week in PHRF A; INVISIBLE HAND was 2nd in ORR Class D and 3rd in fleet in Cabo Race (after winning most of the race!); VELOCITY gets 2nd in Charleston Race Week PHRF B; SHMOKING JOE wins IRC Class in its maiden voyage on the famous Round Island Race and 5th overall in 450 boat IRC Class (the famous America's Cup Course around the Isle of Wight- England); JAKE wins its maiden voyage in Sydney, Australia in the Short Offshore Points Series; J/111s win both the Chicago-Mackinac Race (KASHMIR) in class and sweep the Bayview-Mackinac Race (NO SURPRISE); and J/111 gets third overall in the RORC Fastnet Race Double-handed Class (J-XCENTRIC was winning with 100 meters to go at the finish line, but wind died and they "parked" for 7 hours before finishing!).  The J/145 BAD PAK gets 2nd class C and 4th in fleet in the Cabo Race, later wins the Ensenada Race and also the TransPac Race in Division 4!  J/145 also wins Hong Kong- San Fernando Race to the Phillipines. J/122s continued their winning ways, taking the Fastnet Race IRC 2 class (the French NUTMEG IV) and, for the 3rd time, wins the Storm Trysail Club's Stamford-Vineyard Race (CHRISTOPHER DRAGON) and again takes the IRC East Coasts in Annapolis, Maryland (CATAPULT)!  The J/109 wins Double-handed Farallones Race off San Francisco, the Vancouver Isle 360 Race of 800nm+ off Vancouver, BC, the Lake Ontario 300 race (300nm) and the Bayview-Mackinac Race-- plus it's the Irish IRC Boat of the Year!  The J/97 wins SPI Ouest France and JIKA-JIKA wins Cowes Week and J/97 is also selected RORC's IRC Boat of the Year!  In the one-design world, the J/22 Women's Worlds sailed in Rochester, New York was won by local sailor Cory Sertl.  The J/22 Worlds sailed in New Orleans, is won by Rob Johnston from Heath, Texas.  The J/24 Worlds were sailed in Buenos Aires, Argentina and won by the Argentinean Team LUCA with skipper Alejo Rigoni.  And, in the J/24 Pan Am Games, past J/24 World Champion Mauricio Santa Cruz from Brazil wins the Gold Medal.  The J/80 Worlds were held in Copenhagen, Denmark with Spanish teams sweeping the top three, again, with Ignacio Camino winning a second time on NEXTEL ENGINEERING.  And, the J/80 North Americans were again won by Glenn Darden on LE TIGRE.  Plus, J/80 wins BEST SAILBOAT AWARD UNDER 40 FEET at the Shanghai China Boatshow. 

2010
The year of 2010 was characterized by an on-going recession worldwide, but unlike its competitors in the sailing industry, the J/Team continued to execute and expand the business worldwide. Two more new models were launched in 2010- the J/111 one-design speedster and the J/108 shoal performance cruiser. The J/111 was launched in August by CCF Composites in Bristol, Rhode Island and after a successful fall boatshow circuit in Newport and Annapolis, it garners the SAILING WORLD BOAT OF THE YEAR "Best One-Design Keelboat" Award and SAIL Magazine BEST BOATS AWARD - Performance Category-- the second year in a row that a J/Design has won the category!  The J/108 was launched in October in Les Sables d'Olonne, France by JB Composites, the next generation of performance, shoal-draft cruising boats in the line after the successful introduction of the J/95.  In the offshore sailing world, the J/122s win both racing divisions in the Chicago-Mackinac Race, the first and only time that feat has ever been accomplished, with FLYING JENNY IV winning the Mackinac Trophy Overall and SKYE winning the Double-handed Division.  J/122s repeat winning the Storm Trysail Club Stamford-Vineyard Race Overall, the IRC East Coasts in Annapolis and the Rolex Middle Sea Race off Malta.  Plus, the J/122s were winning in Australia, winning the IRC 1 Class offshore in Sydney Harbour series.  The classic J/125s win Key West Race Week, Coastal Cup off California and the Cabo Race to Mexico.  And, the Queen of the J/Fleet, the J/65 BRAND NEW DAY wins Bermuda Race Class serving home-cooked meals with red wine and cold white wine from the on-board wine cooler each night and sailing in air-conditioned comfort "off-watch" below decks!  In the one-design world, the Americans re-assert their domination atop the J/24 class with American Tim Healy winning the J/24 Worlds in Malmo, Sweden (America's Cup sailor Ed Baird last won it there in 1981!).  A number of J/80 regattas in France and Spain affected by the monstrous volcanic ash cloud that swept across Europe in April, affecting traffic everywhere.  This didn't stop the Spanish from, again, winning a very windy, epic J/80 Worlds in Newport, RI with Spaniard Pichu Torcida taking it for a second time! 

2009
The year of 2009 was marked by a continuing, persistent economic climate that bordered on "heavy recession", particularly in North America and Europe. The Asian and South American markets maintained a relative degree of prosperity by comparison. Nevertheless, 2009 was a remarkable year for the J/Team worldwide. For the first time ever, J/Boats introduced three new models in one year- the J/95 and J/97 in the spring and the J/111 in the fall. Launched in April in Bristol, Rhode Island by CCF Composites, the J/95 was the first shoal-draft performance cruising sailboat ever launched by J/Boats. With twin-rudders, wheel-steering and a fully-functioning keel-centerboard, the J/95 broke new ground. And, it won a lot of hearts, selling nearly two dozen boats by year-end and winning the first "triple-crown" of sailing industry awards ever-- the CRUISING WORLD BOAT OF THE YEAR, the SAILING WORLD BOAT OF THE YEAR and the SAIL BEST BOATS "Performance Cruising" Category.  In the first weekend of May, the performance IRC cruiser-racer J/97 was launched by JB Composites in Les Sables d'Olonne, France. The J/97 open, innovative interior design, aft head, six foot standing headroom and sleeping for six made it an immediate success in the European market. J/97 quickly demonstrated its capabilities offshore, sweeping its class in Cowes Week in August.  Later in the fall, the somewhat revolutionary J/111 was first announced to the world and by year-end over 25 boats had been sold-- the most successful launch of a new 35 foot boat ever by J/Boats!  On the sailing front, the J/122 J-BELLINO sailed by Rob Craigie from England wins the 2009 OSTAR. Plus, the J/105 KING OF SHAVES sailed by Oscare Meade was 2nd his class and youngest finisher ever in this 2,900nm race. The J/122s continued to win many offshore contests, including a three-peat in the Chicago-Mackinac Race. The J/122 SKYE led a sweep of the Chicago-Mac Double-handed Division, with a J/35 and J/29 coming in 2nd and 3rd, respectively! Other big J's continued to perform as well, with the J/133 BATFISH taking the RORC Offshore Season Points Championship Overall!  In the one-design world, the balance of power in the major J one-design classes had clearly moved away from the Americans. J/24s held their Worlds in Annapolis in May with Brazilian Mauricio Santa Cruz winning his 3rd Worlds title. The J/22 Worlds were held on Lago di Garda, Italy in June and the Dutch teams from the Netherlands swept all top three spots. The J/80s had a record 133 boats for their Worlds in Santander, Spain in July which saw all top three spots swept by the Spanish teams.

2008
Despite the economy slowing down, it was another great year of sailing for J owners. Starting with Key West, good turnouts for the J/80, J/105 and J/109s all hosting their Midwinters. Of the six handicap divisions that included at least one J Boat (5 PHRF divisions and 1 IRC division), J owners dominated the leader board, winning 44% of the top three class trophies. Experienced offshore sailor Ned Cabot recently published a story of the latest adventure aboard his J/46 ‘Cielita’ in Ocean Navigator magazine (Jan/Feb ’08 issue). The J/24 celebrated its 30th birthday at the J/24 Midwinters with 42 teams sailing a tough 11 race, no throw-out series- brothers Waldek and Chris Zaleski aboard TWINS won-- they also won the J/24 Nationals later in the year! 32 J/109s had a fun time sailing the J/UK J/109 Nationals. For the STC Bermuda Race, J owners turned out in record numbers and represented 22% of the 210 boat fleet - the first time J has surpassed Swan (14%) for the most popular brand/design in a Bermuda Race. And, J owners made the most of it. 52% of the top 25 overall finishers sailing IRC were J’s, and owners collected 26% of the top three places in all divisions and overall combined. Andrea Casale of Italy won the J/24 World Championship with 76 boats and an incredible 17 countries represented. Philippe Delaporte’s J/122 PEN AZEN was named the 2008 Yacht of the Year by the Royal Ocean Racing Club, dominating the IRC Classes in most all events. This success in IRC was repeated by the J/122 TKO winning Rolex Big Boat Series in San Francisco. Greg Fisher of Annapolis, MD won the J/22 World Championship in Rochester, NY over a record 103 sailing teams. Over in the Mediterranean, the J/133 CHESTRESS won IRC Class 3 and a 2nd Overall in the 2008 Rolex Middle Sea Race. 8 teams from 8 countries sailed the first International J/80 Invitational Regatta in Xiamen, China-- the first ever J/80 one-design event in the Pacific Rim

2007
A record year for J/Boat owners with major offshore racing wins across the US and Europe. The introduction of the new J/122 built by J/Europe taking the IRC circuit in France, the UK, the Netherlands and the USA by storm achieving several overall wins both inshore and offshore. J/Boat owners are class and overall champions of numerous offshore events including Ft. Lauderdale-Key West Race, Pineapple Cup, Bayview Mac Race, Annapolis-Newport Race, Charleston Bermuda Race, Transpac, Chicago Mac, and several RORC offshore races. J/133 is awarded “Best Series Produced Yacht” and J/122 wins IRC 1 class overall for the entire season in the 2007 RORC series. J/80 production races by the 1,000 hull milestone with over 1050 boats built. A record 120 J/80s sail at the World Championships in La Trinite France. The J/105 Class sets attendance records on both US coasts culminating in a 69 boat fleet at the North American Champs in Annapolis. J/105 also wins RORC 2-handed season trophy. J/109 class activity thrives in the US and UK. Clay Burkhalter successfully sails his Rod Johnstone designed Mini 6.5 ‘Acadia’ across the Atlantic from France to Brazil finishing 12th overall out of 89 entries. The J/80 debuts at the Asian Sportboat Championship placing 1st and 2nd overall. J/Europe increases factory capacity by 40% thanks to increasing demand worldwide for new J/Boats. Several J/Owners actively engaged cruising their boats through the oceans of the world. Congratulations to J/Owners for an incredible year!

2006
The J/92S makes its USA debut. The J/100 reaches 100 boat milestone and production begins in Europe. New 40’ J/122 development begins with J/Europe. J/ owners win 12 trophies in the Centennial Newport to Bermuda Race with the J/44 and J/42 classes the largest in the fleet. Glenn Darden captures the J/80 World title in Galveston Bay, TX, while fellow Texan Jon Halbert wins the inaugural J/109 North American Championships at New York Yacht Club. J/109 and double-handed J/105 finish 1-2 in Rolex Middle Sea Race. The York family completes a circumnavigation aboard their J/46 Aragorn. The J/22 North Americans returns to Fleet #1 Lake Minnetonka, MN with Terry Flynn crowned champion. The J/80 reaches 900 boat milestone and new fleets are established in Spain & Italy. The J/105 is awarded the Serendip Trophy for the Best Series-Produced Yacht in IRC by RORC for 2006 and Shaun Murphy’s Slingshot is named RORC 2006 Yacht of the Year and wins the Somerset Memorial Trophy for outstanding achievement of a 2-handed yacht. The J/122 is introduced and displayed at the Paris Show to rave reviews with a December launch in Hamble, UK and successful sea-trials.

2005
The new J/65 launches in San Diego. Scotsman Ruairidh Scott wins the Silva J/80 Worlds in Falmouth, UK. The J/105 class sets new milestones with a 40 boat fleet at Key West and the first Canadian hosting of a North American Championship. The J/100 rolls out of the factory at nearly 2 boats per week to meet the high demand. The J/133 notches impressive IRC class wins at Spi Ouest and Block Island Race Week. The rapidly growing J/109 class sees one-design starts at Spi Ouest, Block Island and Cowes Week. Anthony Kotoun of Newport, RI wins the J/24 Worlds in Weymouth, England and the J/24 North Americans in Marblehead, MA. The new J/92S, a family-friendly sprit boat with large cockpit and non-overlapping headsail launches in Europe. J/125 'Rienrag' takes class honors again in the Transpac. Sally Barkow wins the Rolex Int’l Women’s Keelboat Champs in J/22s in Annapolis, and the Women's Match Racing Worlds in J/24's in Bermuda. Henry Morgan, sailing his J/42 'Dolphin', wins the Annapolis-Bermuda Race fleet. Short-handed J-sailors celebrate as Pascal Loison wins the 2-Handed Rolex Fastnet Race in his J/105 and Sam and Gordon Vineyard win Marion- to Bermuda Race in their J/46. The new J/124, a 41’ follow-up sensation to the J/100, launches in Rhode Island.

2004
The J/133 Raincloud wins its debut regatta at Key West and production begins in both the US and France. J109s sweep IRC 4 at Spi Ouest, the UK J/109 Jeronimo is on the winning team of the Rolex Commodore’s Cup, and the J/109 class gets underway with 11 fleets formed, a class website and several class events held. Alec Cutler wins the J/22 Worlds in Annapolis over a fleet of 130 boats, an all-time J attendance record! Three J’s (J/35, J/46 and J/160) set sail in the 2004 Blue Water World Rally. The new J/100 (33’) is launched in Newport to rave reviews, is named Sailing World Magazine’s Overall Boat of the Year, and quickly reaches a six month backlog. J/145s enjoy class wins in the Newport to Bermuda and Port Huron-Mackinac races. Dave McConaughy wins the 25th Anniversary J/30 North Americans in Barrington, RI. Glen Darden of TX wins both the J/80 North Americans in Sag Harbor, NY and the 52 boat J/105 North Americans in Marion, MA. Wow! Jens Hookanson outduels Jeff Johnstone on the last leg of the final race to win the J/24 Worlds in Noroton, CT. The new J/65 (65‘) is announced as J Boats’ entry into the luxury performance sailing market with a custom bay set up at Pearson Composites and a highly anticipated 05 launching.

2003
The J/24 class celebrates its Silver 25th Anniversary in Newport, while the J/35 class has its 20th in Toronto with 27 boats racing for the North American Championship. The J/105 class continues to set attendance records and is the only class present at all 9 NOOD Regattas. Dr. Mike Finn’s J/160 ‘Kativa’ wins the Charleston to Bermuda Race; J/125 'Rienrag' that takes line and class honors for Division 3 in the Tranpac. J/42 owners create a new owner association. J/Boats continue to thrive under IRC with J/145 winning the Overall IRC Season Championship in UK (1-2 in class at Fastnet), and the J/109 winning its class at Fastnet as well as at Cowes and Spi Ouest. J/Europe is formed as new European builder (France). Jay Lutz wins J/80 Worlds in Fort Worth Texas as class breaks the hull #600 barrier. Sally Barkow wins the Rolex Women’s Keelboat Champs in J/22s in Annapolis. J/133 is awarded the Overall Boat of the Year award by Sailing World Magazine and Best Performance Cruiser by Cruising World.

2002
J/109 results roll in all year with wins at Spi-Ouest, Cowes Week, Breskens Race Week, Double-handed Round Britain Race and the prestigious Atlantic Trophy. J/109 plugs are shipped to the US and TPI begins production. ISAF selects the J/22 (women’s keelboat division) and J/80 (men’s keelboat division) for the World Sailing Games in Marseilles. J/105 explosion continues with 50 boats at the North Americans in Chicago, hull #600 built, and selected for UBS Challenge Pro Match-Racing. J/80 earns class start at Kiel Week and J/80 Worlds are held in La Rochelle, France. The J/Fest Regatta Series goes national with sponsors and five great events. Brad Read wins J/24 Worlds on its return to Newport. J/109 and J/105 are 1st and 2nd overall in Rolex Middle Sea Race. Terry Flynn wins 60-boat J/22 Worlds in Texas.

2001
J/145 is selected as a Sail Magazine Top 10 winner and wins class at Key West. J/80 class hosts its first World Championships in Newport. J Boats introduces the 35’ J/109 in Europe. Waterline Systems begins building J/22s, helping to revitalize J/22 class growth. J/130 BONKERS is overall winner in the Pineapple Cup race to Jamaica. J/160s win in Newport-Ensenada, Puerto-Vallarta, Marblehead-Halifax and Swiftsure races. J/125 wins overall at Middle Sea Race in Malta. The Rolex Int’l Women’s Keelboat Champs is held in J22s in Annapolis, with Cory Sertl’s team crowned champion.

2000
J/46 earns double honors, first as a Sail Magazine Top 10 winner; and as a category winner in Sailing World Magazine's Boat of the Year Awards. New carbon fiber J/145 (48') is launched. 92 boats attend the J/22 Worlds in Holland. J/105 production accelerates with hull #400 launched and European production underway. Waterline Systems becomes new US builder for J/24 and the World Championship returns to Newport for its 22nd running. New "L" version (L for liveaboard) is introduced for the popular J/42.

1999
J/35 inducted into the American Sailboat Hall of Fame ceremonies in Atlantic City. J/125 wins "Sportboat of the Year" from Sailing World. J/120 J BIRD clean sweeps the Puerta-Vallarta race with 1st to finish, 1st in class and 1st overall- only the 3rd boat in history to do so (other two were 70' sleds). J/46 performance-cruising yacht is launched. J/22 featured in Santa-Maria Cup (women's match racing) and for the ISAF Women's Match Racing Worlds. J/30 and J/35 classes combine efforts to run their 20th and 15th North American Championships in Annapolis. 25 J/105s sail one design at Block Island. Over 275 J/105s now sailing in 15 fleets worldwide. The Rolex Int'l Women's Keelboat Champs return to Newport in J/24s.

1998
J/160 PIPEDREAM wins Round-the-World Rally (American division) with a crew of five. Owner Scott Piper departs on cruise around the world in opposite direction! High tech built J/90 and J/125 usher in new wave of technology - carbon composite construction with 50% ballast/displacement ratios. J/90 wins "Sportboat of the Year" from Sailing World. J/125 wins at Block Island Race Week and St. Francis Big Boat Series. J/120s sweep top 3 spots in Newport to Ensenada Race. J/22 featured in ISAF World Championship in Dubai for women's match-racing and fleet disciplines. US Master's Championship held in J/105s in San Francisco. J/80 becomes fastest growing one-design in Sweden with 20 boats sailing. J/120 reaches hull #100, with 28 boats sailing in Southern California.

1997
100 J/24s attend the 20th anniversary J/24 Midwinters in Key West, Florida. Johnstone Family receives The Industry Leadership Award from SAIL Magazine. Harry Smith wins 1100nm Marina Del Rey to Puerto-Vallarta Race on his J/160 'Bushwacker' and J/160 Hull #3 PIPEDREAM begins the 'Round the World Rally'. The Moorings Company purchases a fleet of J/120s for an innovative "race weeks" charter program in Tortola.

1996
The first two of six J/160s are launched in early May. These deluxe flagships go on to win several offshore point-to-point races including a course record from Annapolis to Bermuda! J/44 Class returns for the 1996 Bermuda Race in force with 11 starters. J/105 reaches critical mass for class racing throughout the US with over 165 boats numerous regional events and a successful North American Championship. The new production J/32 Cruiser, designed by Alan Johnstone, is launched in July with over 20 sold in the first six months. J/Boats web site is expanded with a growing on-line class association presence, owner forums and monthly updates.

1995
J/120 named Cruising World Magazine's Overall Boat-of-the-Year and Best Value in a Full-Size Cruiser. J/24 is first of five inductees into the American Sailboat Hall of Fame. J/130 STARLIGHT EXPRESS takes line honors in Newport-Ensenada Race. New J/42 Cruiser is introduced. Hull #1 GANNET wins two New York Yacht Club events and Class A Downeast Racing Circuit with a cruising asymmetric spinnaker and short-handed crew. J/35 class rebounds in participation with 35 entries at its North American Championship. J/105s are featured on ESPN in the Brut Cup professional match-racing circuit. J Composite of France begins European production of the J/80 and J/92.

1994
J/130 named Sailing World's Boat-of-the-Year among Racer-Cruisers. J/22 & J/24 selected for inaugural IYRU World Sailing Championships, J/44 is first one-design class ever given start in Bermuda Race. J/120 introduced at SAIL EXPO with carbon mast and wins New England Solo-Twin. J/110 introduced at Annapolis Boat Show.

1993
J/92 is Sailing World's Overall Boat-of-the-Year. J/80 One-Design is launched- the first J model to be built with TPI's patented SCRIMP molding technology. J/22 celebrates its 10th anniversary by becoming an IYRU International Class with 1200 boats. J/33 DAYBREAK overall winner of Chicago-Mackinac. Newly launched J/130 and J92 sweep Andaman Sea Race in Asia.

1992
J/105 becomes Sailing World's Boat-of-the-Year among racer-cruisers, and ushers in the sport boat revolution. J/92 is introduced and destined for the 1992 Readers Choice Award from Sailing World. J/24 #5000 and J/35 #300 are launched. Rod Johnstone is inducted into the Sailing World Hall of Fame.

1991
Nick Brown's J/44 IONA wins Fastnet in IMS. Fortune Magazine names J Boats as one of the world's 100 best American made products. J/39s and J/35s sweep top 4 positions in CHS at Cowes Week. J Boats pioneers carbon-fiber retractable bowsprits and asymmetric spinnakers on offshore boats, introducing the first of its new "sprit" series, the J/105.

1990
J/35c named Sailing World's Boat-of-the-Year among 30-35 footers. J/44 wins NYYC Cruise. Motor Boating & Sailing names J/24 as 1 of 2 best sailboats of all time. New J/39 wins MBYC Fall Series. J/35 wins class in Sydney-Hobart Race. J/44 J-HAWK wins CHS class at Cowes Week.

1989
New J/44 wins New York Yacht Club Queen's Cup and Cowes Week on way to becoming Sailing World's Overall Boat-of-the-Year.

1988
J/34c named Sailing World's Boat-of-the-Year. New J/33 wins Class at Block Island Race Week. Jeff, Stuart, Drake, & Alan Johnstone commence management of company operations at J/Boat office in Newport, RI. TPI (J Builder) introduces industry-leading 10 year blister warranty.

1987
J/35 becomes America's fastest growing big-boat one-design with 24 sailing in Class at Block Island. J/37s win Class in 3 major race weeks.

1986
J/40 named Sailing World's Boat-of-the-Year among US designs. J/35 is lst Overall in Miami-Montego Bay and New England Solo-Twin. J/28 and J/37 Cruisers introduced.

1985
Charley Scott's J/41 SMILES wins SORC Overall. J boats introduces it's first purpose built cruising boat, the J/40, that then goes on to win Class in Chicago -Mackinac. J/34 becomes best selling IOR design in America.

1984
New J/27 is overall winner of MORC Internationals with J/29 winning Class A. J/35 is 1st Overall MHS in Chicago - Mackinac. J/41 has 1-2-3 sweep of One Ton North Americans and Bermuda Race class.

1983
J/22 and J/35 introduced. J/22 wins Class at MORC Internationals.

1982
New J/29s finish 1-2-3 to sweep Class in Block Island Race Week

1981
Stu, Drake & Jeff Johnstone start J/World Performance Sailing School. J/36 Wins Class A in Antigua.

1980
Nissan Motors becomes Japanese builder. J/24 wins Caribbean Ocean Racing Circuit, becomes IYRU International Class and named by SAIL (10th Anniversary) as "best keelboat in 30 years."

1979
J/30 #1 WARHOOP finishes 3rd in SORC Class. First J/24 Worlds in Newport with 78 boats.

1978
20 boats attend first J/24 one-design event at Key West. 68 boats attend North Americans in Newport. 1000 boats are sold with builders set up in UK, Brazil, Argentina, Australia and US West Coast where Trask family joins Johnstones to build J/24's.

1977

Brothers Bob and Rod Johnstone finish 1-2 in J/24s in MORC Division at Block Island Week. J/24s go on to dominate the MORC Internationals in Annapolis.

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J/Boats: Sailing to Success

The story of J/Boats is a classic entrepreneurial tale: With a $20,000 investment, and a speedy 24-foot sailboat that Rod Johnstone built in his garage, Rod & his brother Bob Johnstone went into business. That was 1977. Now, that boat (the J/24), has become the most popular recreational offshore keelboat in the world. The Johnstone family has made an undeniable mark on the sailing world. In addition to the 5,400 J/24s cruising the waves, there are over 7,000 more J/Boats, ranging from the International J/22 to the J/65, that sailing enthusiasts have bought at prices ranging from $10,000 to $2,000,000.

While other manufacturers may sell more boats, the Johnstones have won the high-end, performance-oriented segment of the market. Theirs is the so-called racer/cruiser category: boats that perform well on the race course but which are comfortable and easy enough for the family to daysail and cruise. It is with knowledgeable, experienced sailors that the Johnstones have done best.

The story begins in 1975. Rod, then an ad salesman for the sailing trade magazine, Soundings, and an active one-design sailor decided to build a sailboat he had been designing since completing a Westlawn School of Yacht Design correspondence course in the 60's. With $400-worth of fiberglass and wood, some rigging and hardware left over from a Soling of Bob's, he built the 24' x 9' wide RAGTIME on weekends in his 3 car garage at his home in Stonington, Connecticut. During the summer of 1976, with an all family crew aboard, RAGTIME beat everything in sight. Rod realized he had created something special.

Enter Everett Pearson, the owner of Tillotson Pearson, Inc, a highly respected boat builder in Warren Rhode Island. He was quite taken with Rod's design and agreed to produce the boat on spec in return for the U.S. building rights. Display ads in Soundings got the word out. That winter they set up a makeshift factory in an old textile mill in nearby Fall River, Massachusetts, and began popping out J/24s.

Enter the marketing experience of brother Bob, a vice president of marketing at AMF/Alcort (the makers of Sunfish sailboats at the time). He saw the potential in the boat Rod had designed. From 1975 to 1977, Bob had helped to take Alcort from the red into the black, and then began trying to convince AMF to start producing a boat similar to the J/24. When AMF didn't jump, in February of 1977, at age 43, Bob did and threw in his lot with J/Boats.

With Rod contributing the design and his prototype 'Ragtime' and Bob investing $20,000 to cover start-up costs, office space, and advertising, their 50-50 partnership was launched. They sold 250+ (and delivered 136) J/24s that first year. Each successive year has marked unique achievements in the sport and industry. 

The next generation of Johnstones has been at the helm since 1988, while founders Rod and Bob continue to contribute their talents. Since 1992, Jeff (president) & Alan (vice president & designer) have managed company operations from J/Boats Headquarters in Newport, RI while a total of six of Bob & Rod's sons (Jeff, Alan, Stu, Drake, Phil and Peter) serve on the J/Boats Board of Directors.

  • J/Newsletter- July 11th, 2018 J/121 Flies on Baltic Sea: 
    Marstand -> Malmo Delivery
    (Gothenburg, Sweden)- “It was a really nice experience sailing her downwind in 17-20 kts of breeze on a 160nm delivery trip from Marstrand to Falsterbo (Malmo). We had Peter Gustafsson of BLUR.SE sailing fame onboard for the first leg down to southern Sweden. There is also a fun video from the downwind ride,” reports Fredrik Rydin, the proud new owner of the J/121 JOLENE.  Here is Peter’s report below.

    “I have been intrigued with Fredrik Rydin’s process of bringing his new J/121 up to speed in Marstrand. His focus is on shorthanded racing and the appropriate sail wardrobe, instrumentation and systems to make sailing shorthanded effective- in fact, many of those elements are similar to my J/111 BLUR.SE.

    It has been hectic to get everything done, so there was no traditional testing of everything before the delivery from Marstrand to Stockholm.  The plan was for Fredrik and his father Axel to do the delivery/sail to Stockholm and it was possible for me to join them on the first stage. It was especially exciting for me, since the weather forecast for the Marstrand-Malmö route promised a windspeed of 8-10 meters per second (about 16-21 kts).

    When I landed in Marstrand, it was still a full-on commissioning process! Sikaflex and cartons everywhere! But, somewhere one has to draw a line, and it felt like order was necessary to get the ball rolling. It is easy under estimating how much work it takes to get a bigger boat commissioned and how many things can go wrong.  So, it felt like Fredrik and Axel were happy to finally get away sailing on their new ocean greyhound!

    Once out of the pretty harbor of Marstrand, we hoisted the main, then went straight to the A3 asymmetric! But, we soon switched soon to an A2! Bigger, faster! Time to celebrate with morning coffee (see Fredrik here).

    Even though the boat is only meter longer than the J/111, it feels like a much bigger boat. For better or worse, everything gets a bit heavier, but the sailing becomes a bit more comfortable.

    So, when the wind pressed at 9-11 m/s (~17-22 kts), we completely trucked downwind!  We were doing a steady 12-13-14 kts with tops of 18-19 kts on the knotmeter. The boat has very responsive steering, despite two steering wheels.  And, no trouble placing the boat right where you wanted it in the waves. She also felt stiffer than J/111 and, in places where BLUR probably would broach, one could easily get back to onto course and dive down the next wave.

    After sailing both the 88 and 111, and now the 121, I think the VMG downwind planing threshold is moved slightly up the wind scale relative to her smaller sisterships. If the 88 planes at 7-8 m/s (13.5-15.5 kts), Blur at 9-10 m/s (17.5-19.5 kts), you'll really like 10-11 m/s (19-22 kts) on the 121 to make it really fun! But, then it will go really fast, “sending it downhill” so to speak!

    There were no good polars yet for the boat (the only one that it had was the ORC polar chart from ORC for the J/121 JACKHAMMER from the United Kingdom, which has a different configuration).  So, we drove using BLUR’s numbers downwind. TWA seemed about right, and in conditions where the 111 was always on a plane, we were steady at 100% planing on the 121. Fun for BLUR ... but, as I said, a little more wind, the 121 will simply fly away- you could tell going down the waves, the 121 is a reaching/ running speedster, hitting 19 kts was not hard for this boat- effortless, in fact. This boat will surprise a lot of sailors at its ability to go fast offshore- a reaching machine that can still go upwind like its legendary predescessors.


    The cockpit is incredibly comfortable. Easy to get around and good ergonomics for both skipper and the trimmer, who can sit in front of the steering wheel and have good contact with the skipper without being in the way. All fittings are where they should be, although there are clearly some adjustments needed to be made for how Fredrik wants to sail the boat.

    We dropped past Vinga and down towards Nidingen. Perfect conditions and steady 10-13 knots boatspeed (planing mode, obviously) with sporadic bursts of 16-17 kts. The route took us far west, but we chose to drive safe.

    We experienced another gorgeous sunset. I estimated that this was the eighth full night sail this year, which feels very good. Swedish summer nights out on the wild blue sea are something special. It is twilight all night long!

    The last gasp of breeze was at Gilleleje, before the wind turned southeast and dropped to 2-3 m/s (3.5-5.8 kts) at Höganäs. Pretty much as the weather routing had predicted.

    After a little motoring at Helsingør, we could sail on a reach in the light wind down towards Ven. We tested the water ballast (small windward heel effect in the light wind) and compared the performance between jib and J0 (a big jib or small code that is rolled out flying from the top of the mast and end of the sprit pole). Useful data collection, and we were able to work around the sail chart and the experience we have on BLUR.

    Here is what the white sail wardrobe looks like: a 104% Jib LM (40 m2), a J0 (JIB ZERO 61 m2) and a heavy air #4 set on its own inside of the foretriangle (30 m2).

    Here is what the North Sails sail selection chart looks like for the J/121 JOLENE.

    So, the sail chart is very close to what we have on BLUR. But, on J/121, you've been thinking right from the start. One big difference is that J0 is placed on the end of the sprit and masthead and stretched tight with a 3:1 ratio; that gives good sail shape and enables 55 TWA sailing upwind in light airs- a big advantage!

    The interior has the same layout as the J/109, the "owners cabin" on the port side aft and a giant head and storage locker on the starboard side. There is a great forepeak dedicated to sail handling, but can also accommodate two pipe berths.

    The interior is perfect for single or doublehanded racing.  But, offshore you should not sail more than six to be comfortable in the two main cabin settees and swing up bunks. But, with water ballast it should be just right to sail with six.

    Well, it was now time to find the dock in Malmo after the Öresund Bridge. We then started the autopilot, which required a little change of settings and will need adjustments in further "sea trials". Many things to be adjusted on a new boat!
    Fredrik has the same setup as BLUR (see here). The only difference is that you have two B&G Zeus 3’s, one for each wheel!

    We finally make it to the dock in the Falsterbok channel. Many “thanks” to Fredrik for letting me go. And, congratulations on a beautiful boat!

    How does it compare to a J/111? It is the same concept, but with a clearer focus on offshore racing. This boat is best for stretching its legs out at sea. To Bermuda, Hawaii or a quick Gotland Runt Race. It does not feel as sporty (powered up) as a J/111, or even a J/88.  But, in offshore weather and waves like we experienced, you will reel off the miles offshore without getting tired- it is a very comfortable boat! And, with a smaller crew.

    Right now Fredrik & Axel are in Kalmarsund. They drove with the A2 asymmetric spinnaker from the canal to the cutout and got the chance to pump in 400 liters of water into the water tanks; they were sailing with a TWA 135 at 7-9 m/s (13.5-17.0 kts). There is no question, the water ballast definitely makes a difference. We wish them a nice trip!”

    Watch the J/121 downwind sailing video here   Thanks for this contribution from Peter Gustafsson at BLUR.SE
     


     
    Offshore World Championship Preview
    (The Hague, The Netherlands)- The Hague Offshore Sailing World Championship is in final preparation for the fleet of 90 yachts from 15 nations to start the event. The fleet represents a diverse cross section of teams from around the world comprised of seasoned champions, newcomers and older production cruiser/racers, as well as brand new custom racing designs being sailed by professional crews and Corinthian amateurs.

    “It’s this rich diversity that makes this a truly World Championship that appeals to all offshore sailors,” said Bruno Finzi, a member of the International Jury for the event and Chairman of the Offshore Racing Congress (ORC). For the first time, both ORC’s rating system and IRC, the system used by the Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC) and its French counterpart UNCL, will be used for scoring in this event. As a result, all entries were required to be measured to have certificates from both systems. Use of these systems allows for boats of different types to race against each other under handicap in a week-long format of both offshore and inshore racing.

    The first offshore race starts on Sunday, July 15th. The length of this race will vary depending on the weather, but the first teams are expected to finish on Monday 16 July.

    On Tuesday 17 July, either offshore racing will resume, or the start of windward/leeward course racing will begin on two designated course areas off the beach at Scheveningen, with inshore racing to continue daily through Friday 20 July. A total of nine races are scheduled, two offshore and seven inshore. The teams with the lowest combined scores using ORC and IRC ratings in each of three classes (A, B, C) will be crowned the new 2018 World Champions, with prizes also awarded to teams with all Corinthian (amateur) crew.

    Sailing in the twenty-seven boat Class B are primarily custom and semi-custom production boats.  Joining that fray will be a standard J/111 RED HERRING, sailed by Gerwin Janssen from The Netherlands- hopefully, his “home field” advantage will helpful through the course of nine races.
    Class C has fifty-three boats from twelve nations across Europe; it’s by far the largest class in the event and starting so many big boats on one starting line will prove to be a formidable task! Some speculate the line will be from 1/4 to 1/3 nm in length!  Like the other classes, there are a number of new and current custom boats racing against standard production boats.  Leading the charge for the five J/Teams will be the current IRC European Champion- Fred Bouvier & Didier LeMoal’s J/112E J-LANCE 12.  Also, participating from Ireland is a past United Kingdom IRC Class Champion- the J/35 BENGAL MAGIC sailed by Jim Chalmers.  Finally, there are three J/109s hoping to get their shot at some silver as well; including MAJIC (Arnout Joorritsma), VRIJGEZEILIG (Michel Heidweiller), and JAI ALAI (Alain Bornet).  For more Offshore World Championship sailing information
     

    Bayview-Mackinac Race Preview
    (Port Huron, MI)- One hundred ninety teams are confirmed for the 2018 Bell’s Beer Bayview Mackinac Race, scheduled for July 14.  With 93 years of tradition behind it, this unique distance race, with two courses (204 or 259 nm) that start on lower Lake Huron and finish at Mackinac Island, has a knack for bringing back regulars and reeling in newcomers, each year weaving new interesting stories into its tapestry of racing fun.  One of the largest brand contingents happens to be J/sailors from across the Great Lakes- thirty-three crews in total.

    Division I- Cove Island Course
    Not surprisingly, one entire class of thirteen-boats is comprised of all J/Teams- Class D that has only J/111s and J/120s.  The four J/111s are CAPERS (Don Hudak), FREEDOM (Jim Cooper), SHMOKIN JOE (Jeff Schaefer), and UNPLUGGED (Tim Clayson).  There are nine J/120s that will be battling for class honors as well; including Charlie Hess’ FUNTECH RACING, Mike & Bob Kirkman’s HOT TICKET, the trio on J-HAWKER (Dave Sandlin, Ken Brown, Mark Pikula), and Henry Mistele’s NIGHT MOVES.

    Sailing in the eleven-boat Class E are seven J/Teams, including Matt Schaedler’s J/122 BLITZKRIEG, Jim Murray’s CALLISTO, Bill Hamilton’s J/109 PHOENIX, and four J/105s (Mark Denuyl’s GOOD LOOKIN, Mark Symonds’ PTERODACTYL, Matt Haglund’s RAMPAGE, & Jim Murphy’s WINDSHADOW).

    The dozen-boat Class G is considered the “Level 35” class with ten J/35s headed to the starting line and their North American Championship two weeks later!  Those teams include Bill Wildner’s MR BILL’S WILD RIDE (of course!), Tim & Amie Ross’ BLACKHAWK, Ed & John Bayer’s FALCON, and Greg Whipple’s WHIPLASH.

    The Class I Cruising fleet includes Gary Gonzalez’s J/42 DOS MAS and the J/35 DYNOMYTE skippered by Gary Warner.

    Division II- Shore Course
    Sailing in the fourteen-boat Class M fleet will be a previous class winner, the infamous J/34 IOR classic called KNEE DEEP and sailed by Brett & Katie Langolf from Deadman’s Flat YC.  For more Belles Beer Bayview Mackinac Race sailing information
     

    J/35 North Americans Update
    (Muskegon, MI)- Has it really been thirty-five ears of instant gratification in an offshore handicap racer and one-design sailboat?

    The North Star Sail Club, The City of Cheboygan, MI and the J/35 Class Association are proud to announce the 35th Anniversary of the J/35 National Championship, July 26 – 29, 2018.

    Competing in the northern waters of Lake Huron between Cheboygan and Mackinac Island, the J/35 National Championship brings a competitive fleet of one-design sailors in a boat that brought dazzling offshore performance to sailors of varying experience and ability.

    This year’s competition celebrates the innovation and joy of competitive sailing that is still going strong after thirty-five years. Honoring thirty-five years and presenting the awards will be one of the designers of the J/35, Rod Johnstone.

    In the spring of 1983, after coming out a recession, the was boat designed with a conscientious disregard for any handicap rule and, today, is one of the most successful handicap racing boats ever.

    Join the members of North Star Sail Club and the City of Cheboygan in celebrating the historic event. Awards will be presented by Rod Johnstone on Sunday afternoon at 4:00 PM in the historic City Opera House, downtown Cheboygan, MI.
     

    NYYC Race Week Preview
    (Newport, RI)- The New York YC Race Week will be taking place from July 16th to 21st, 2018 on the waters of Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound for a fleet of thirty-five modern keelboats, of which eleven (33% of the fleet) are J’s. The J/109s will be sailing as a one-design class and the other J/crews will be participating in the IRC and PHRF Navigator classes.

    The half-dozen boat J/109 class includes some of the best East Coast boats on the summer regatta circuits.  Those teams include Albrecht Goethe’s HAMBURG from Lakewood YC, Ted Herlihy’s GUT FEELING from New Bedford YC, Tom Sutton’s LEADING EDGE from Lakewood YC, Bill Sweetser’s RUSH from Annapolis YC, and Bill Kneller’s VOLARE from Coasters Harbor Navy YC.

    In the twenty-one boat IRC Class, sailing offshore will be Sedgwick & Andrew Ward’s J/111 BRAVO from Shelter Island YC, Paul Milo’s J/122 ORION, and NYYC Vice Commodore Bill Ketcham’s J/44 MAXINE.

    Sailing in the PHRF Navigator class will be Tom Wacker’s J/105 TRADING PLACES from Old Cove YC in Brooklyn, New York.  For more New York YC Race Week sailing information
     

    J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    There were many exciting, big events taking place last week in Europe and also offshore on the Pacific Ocean.  The biggest by far was the Island Sailing Club’s famous Round Island Race that took place last Saturday, with over 1,000 boats starting on the famous Royal Yacht Squadron starting line off Cowes, Isle of Wight, United Kingdom.  It was a west-about counter-clockwise race in relatively light airs. Yet another fabulous performance by a J/112E and the new J/121 also had a good outing.  Then, just about due south of the Isle of Wight, England, the J/80 World Championship is being sailed at Les Sables d’Olonne, France with seventy teams from nine countries, hosted by Sports Nautiques Sablais YC.  It is a battle between the top Spanish and French teams so far, with racing completing this Friday. Then, two more J/70 sailing league events took place.  The Italian J/70 Sailing League raced on gorgeous Lake Garda off Malcesine, Italy, hosted by Fraglia Vela Malcesine for eighteen teams from across Italy. Then, the Netherlands J/70 Sailing League just completed Act III at Aalsmeer, a pretty lake in the middle of the country for the fifteen Dutch sailing club teams. This year’s RORC Morgan Cup was a bit of a “drift-a-thon” (or, “kedge-a-thon”, depending on your perspective). Nevertheless, there were some good performances by various J/teams.

    Hopping over the Big Pond to America, on the New England coast, we find that SAIL Newport hosted “The Newport Regatta” for a fleet of two-dozen J/70s, with sailing taking place out in Rhode Island Sound in atypical light airs for this time of year.  Out West, two huge offshore races are heading to Hawaii.  For the Pacific Northwest contingent, a J/122E is sailing the Vic-Maui Race from Victoria, British Columbia 2,300+nm to Maui, Hawaii- they are ten days into it already, updates are below.  Then, in fresh conditions, the biennial 2,275nm Pacific Cup Race started from San Francisco, CA to Oahu, Hawaii, for a fleet of J/crews (two J/120s, J/35, J/92, & J/105).

    Read on! The J/Community and Cruising section below has many entertaining stories and news about J/Sailors as well as cruising blogs about those who continue to enjoy the Caribbean and the South Pacific, staying warm while others are trying to stay warm up north.  Check them out!  More importantly, if you have more J/Regatta News, please email it or  upload onto our J/Boats Facebook pag  Below are the summaries.

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Jun 30- Vic-Maui International Yacht Race- Victoria, BC, Canada
    Jul 7-14- J/80 World Championship- Les Sables d’Olonne, France
    Jul 12-15- Italian J/70 Cup- Malcesine, Italy
    Jul 12-14- Canadian J/70 National Championship- Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
    Jul 12-20- Offshore Sailing Worlds- The Hague, The Netherlands
    Jul 12-15- Vineyard Cup- Vineyard Haven, Martha’s Vineyard, MA
    Jul 13- Lake Ontario 300 Challenge Race- Port Credit, ONT, Canada
    Jul 13- RORC Cowes-Dinard-St Malo Race- St Malo, France
    Jul 14- Belles Beer Bayview Mackinac Race- Port Huron, MI
    Jul 16-21- New York YC Race Week- Newport, RI
    Jul 19-20- Edgartown Race Week- Edgartown, Martha’s Vineyard, MA
    Jul 19-22- Whidbey Island Race Week- Whidbey Island, WA
    Jul 20-29- Travemunde Race Week- Travemunde, Germany
    Jul 21- Chicago to Mackinac Race- Chicago, IL
    Jul 21- Edgartown Round Island Race- Edgartown, Martha’s Vineyard, MA
    Jul 21-22- Fiesta Cup- Santa Barbara, CA
    Jul 23-28- J/24 European Championship- Glucksburg, Germany
    Jul 26-29- Marblehead NOOD Regatta- Marblehead, MA
    Jul 26-29- J/105 North American Championship- Harbor Springs, MI
    Jul 26-29- J/35 North American Championship- Cheboygan, MI
    Jul 27-29- J/88 Great Lakes Championship- Youngstown, NY
    Jul 27- New England Solo-Twin- Newport, RI
    Jul 27- Santa Barbara to King Harbor Race- Santa Barbara, CA
    Jul 27-29- Ugotta Regatta- Harbor Springs, MI
    Jul 28-29- CanAm Regatta- Youngstown, NY
    Jul 28- RORC Channel Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

    J/80 World Champs Update
    Spanish Dominate Podium So Far
    (Les Sables d’Olonne, France)- The Sports Nautiques Sablais YC is hosting the J/80 World Championship from the 9th to the 13th July.  So far, they’ve been blessed with good sailing conditions on the bay for the seventy-boat fleet.

    As anticipated, the J/80 World Championship has turned into a full-on battle between the top French and Spanish teams at the top of the leaderboard.

    After three days of sailing with eight races completed, occupying the top three spots on the podium are Spanish teams- Iker Almondoz’s GARATU, Rayco Tabares’ HOTEL PRINCESS YAIZA, and Juan Luis Paez’s PUENTE ROMANO MARBELLA.  The top French teams are sitting in 4th- Simon Moriceau’s ARMEN HABITAT, 6th- Sylvain Pellisier’s INTUITIVE SAILS, 7th- Vianney Guilbaud’s AG+ SPARS, and 9th- Gwendal Nael’s EJP 10.  The top Russian team is Alexei Semenov’s NEW TERRITORIES in 5th place.  Patrick O’Neill’s Irish crew on MOJO are 8th.  And, rounding out the top ten is the Spanish crew of Javier Chacartegui’s IBO.ES.  The top British boat is Jon Powell’s BETTY in 11th position.

    Two French women skippers are in the top 15- Anne Phelipon’s NAVIGATLANTQUE in 12th and Maxime Rousseaux’s CN ST CAST GRAND OUEST ETIQUETTES in 13th- just three points separate them.   Follow the J/80 World Championships on Facebook here.   For more J/80 World Championship sailing information
     

    J’s Dominate Round the Island Race
    Win, Place or Show in SEVEN Classes!
    (Cowes, Isle of Wight, England)- As usual, it was another challenging 60nm offshore adventure for the world-famous “Round Island Race” in the United Kingdom, hosted by the Island Sailing Club in Cowes, Isle of Wight.

    Over one thousand boats began starting at 0630 hrs.  First off was the IRC Zero class, followed by over two-dozen more classes sailing across the glorious Royal Yacht Squadron line in the beautiful morning light.  On Saturday, the High pressure system produced a light NE breeze to start, veering SE-SW during the afternoon depending where you were. It was a hot & sunny, very tactical, long day of sailing- even the TP52’s took 10-11 hours to complete the course!

    The general lack of wind and seabreeze that failed to materialise, left hundreds of teams struggling to reach the Needles before the tidal gate slammed shut in the early part of the race. Those who sneaked through had little option other than to soldier on and endure a slow, challenging, and extremely hot rounding.

    Up for that challenge was the J/Navy sailing across the spectrum of classes.  It was a dominating performance for many J/Crews!

    The highlight was yet another fantastic performance by a J/112E!  This time, it was DAVANTI TYRES (Chaz Ivill & Paul Heys) that won the Owen Parker Memorial Trophy- First Overall in IRC Group 1 and they were also first in IRC 1C Division!

    Following them in IRC 1A Class were the following teams: 2nd the J/111 JOURNEYMAKER, 4th the J/120 HANNAM & PARTNERS Team, 5th the J/122 JAHMALI, 6th the J/111 JITTERBUG, 7th the J/122 KAYA, 10th the J/111 KESTREL, and 11th the J/133 ASSARAIN IV.

    Sailing in IRC 2A Class were twelve J/109s and, not surprisingly, they led a clean sweep of the podium! First was JUBILEE, second DIAMOND JEM, and third JAGO!

    Then, in IRC 2B Class were seven J/105s and six J/109s that also dominated, taking six of the top eight places! Winning was the J/105 JOS OF HAMBLE, 4th the J/105 JIN & TONIC, 5th the J/109 JURA, 6th the J/105 TYREFIX UK, 7th the J/105 MOSTLY HARMLESS, and 8th the J/105 JIGSAW.

    Holding their own in IRC 2C Class was the J/92S UPSTART, taking the third position on the podium.

    IRC 2D Class had four J/92’s and five J/97’s, also with an outstanding set of results (five of the top ten).  Winning was the J/97 JAYWALKER, followed in 3rd by the J/97 JET, 5th the J/97 JUMBLESAIL II, 9th the J/97 HIGHJINKS, and 10th the J/92 JABBERWOCK.

    Taking half of the top six in IRC 3A Class were the following J/Teams; winning was the J/92 SAMURAI J, 4th the J/92 NIGHTJAR, and 6th the J/97 BLACKJACK.

    In the world of Island Sailing Club handicap rules (ISC), there were a number of J/crews participating.  The highlights were the J/100 TIDERACE taking 2nd place in 5B Class.  And, last but not least were the venerable J/24s!  In 6C Class taking 2nd was the J/24 J-RIDER and in 6th was J/24 TEAM IMPACT RACING.

    In addition to the handicap classes, there are also one-design classes for the Round Island Race!

    This year’s J/70 Class was won by MJOLNIR, followed by JENGA 8 in second, and the ROYAL SOUTHERN GBR 101 team in third.

    In the J/88s, first across the line was TIGRIS, followed by David & Kirsty Apthorp’s J-DREAM, and Mister 88’s JONGLEUR in third place.

    The J/105 class had quite the battle all the way around the island, which is not unusual for this closely-fought class.  Winning the battle this year was JOS OF HAMBLE, second was JIN TONIC and third TYREFIX UK.

    Perhaps the biggest surprise for all the J/sailors was how well the J/109s did as a class as well as overall.  Winning was JUBILEE, followed by DIAMOND JEM taking silver and JAGO the bronze.

    However, when you look at the J/Boats Class Trophy (overall IRC- 56 boats total), here is how the top five panned out:
    1st J/109 JUBILEE
    2nd J/109 DIAMOND JEM
    3rd J/112E DAVANTI TYRES
    4th J/109 SAMURAI J
    5th J/111 JOURNEYMAKER II

    For more Round the Island Race sailing information
     

    Duncan Tops J/70s @ SAIL NEWPORT Regatta
    (Newport, RI)-  “THE Newport Regatta”, hosted by SAIL NEWPORT, in conjunction with its supporters- New York YC, Ida Lewis YC, and Newport YC- was held over a gorgeous July 7th and 8th weekend.  While the days were sunny and relatively cool at mid-70s F, the winds were anything but cooperative for the huge J/70 class sailing offshore on Rhode Island Sound.

    While Regatta Manager Matt Duggan and Event Manager Emily Greagori were hoping for real Chamber of Commerce weather conditions for all, only those that were racing inside Narragansett Bay had any meaningful winds for proper round-the-cans racing.  Outside, the winds were wildly erratic on Saturday; forcing postponements, course re-alignments, and cancellations of starts. With winds swinging through 35-45 degree arcs and fluctuating from 2 kts up to a blistering 5 kts (the J/70 class minimum), it was apparent that PRO Peter “Luigi” Reggio (yes, the man, the myth, the legend of the America’s Cup R.C. PRO world) was going to have his hands full getting any racing in whatsoever.  Nevertheless, patience brought enough winds to complete three races on Saturday by 1700 hrs, with most boats getting in around 1800 hrs- an exhausting, long day on the water.

    Sunday had a similar forecast, but with winds building late in the day according to most weather “grib” files.  The morning dawned with a nice cool breeze from the WNW that ultimately swung into the southeast by 1000 hrs at 3-4 kts.  Another postponement ensued as the normally steady seabreeze, yet again, continued to swing erratically all over the map.  However, this time the breeze built up to a somewhat steadier 4-8 kts by the time the last race was completed, with over 35 degree windshifts/ wind streaks rolling across the race track.  After three mercifully short races (just 0.75nm windward legs), the fleet headed back home late again to lick their wounds.

    It was a deeply talented J/70 fleet; with over a dozen teams capable of top ten finishes in any J/70 Worlds.  And, the results reflected that fact, as virtually all boats in the top ten had one or more double-digit finishes in their scorelines.  For many, the saving grace was that after six races completed, they could discard their worst race. And many of the top USA J/70 teams had surprisingly deep scores to toss out!

    Without throw-outs, Martie Kullman’s HYDRA would have won by two points over Jud Smith’s AFRICA, with Peter Duncan’s RELATIVE OBSCURITY in third position.

    With throw-outs, Duncan’s RELATIVE OBSCURITY won with 17 pts, with Kullman’s HYDRA and Smith’s AFRICA tied at 19 pts each, with the tie-breaker going to HYDRA.  The balance of the top five included Glenn Darden’s HOSS in 4th and Bruce Golison’s MIDLIFE CRISIS in 5th.  The two other World Champions were 6th and 7th, respectively- Joel Ronning’s CATAPULT and Tim Healey’s USA 2.

    The top three women’s skippers were Hannah Swett’s SPARKLE (an all-women’s team), Pam Rose’s ROSEBUD, and Heather Gregg’s MUSE.  For more THE Newport Regatta at SAIL Newport sailing information.
     

    Societa Canottieri Garda Salò Tops Italian J/70 Sailing League- Act II
    (Malcesine, Italy)- The Fraglia Vela Malcesine welcomed the second act of the Italian Sailing League, on the splendid setting of Lake Garda.

    “With 18 crews at the start, many of them with great ambitions, we opened the second seasonal selection of LIV tonight,” said Roberto Emanuele de Felice, President of the Italian Sailing League.  “Thanks to the Fraglia Vela of Malcesine for their hospitality and the organization of an event that takes place in an exceptional setting.  The weather conditions of Lake Garda will allow the crews to express themselves at their best. 45 races are expected in three days of racing. We know that the goal is the selection of the top Italian teams for the SAILING Champions League to be held in Porto Cervo, Sardinia later in September."

    The first day of racing after eight long hours on the water produced twenty-four races.  The day started at 0800 hrs for the first flight of teams (after the morning briefing at 0700 hrs!) and ended at 1600 hrs. It was only possible to get in so many races because the strong Pelèr breeze was blowing up to 20 knots early in the morning!

    In fact, the Pelèr winds were way above the average; it blew well beyond midday, making the race course perfect and extremely tactical- lots of puffs and wind streaks roaring down the lake from the Italian Alps!

    Then, at 1300 hrs, the Pelèr stopped and, immediately, the Ora came in from the south!  Crazy weather conditions on such a beautiful sunny, clear day! The new race course was so close to land that many swimmers and tourists were intrigued by the tight maneuvering of the boats right along the shoreline!

    Winning the day easily was Societa Canottieri Garda Salò six 1sts, a 2nd and 3rd.  Six points behind was Circolo Canottieri Aniene with three 1sts and four 2nds in the scoreline.

    Then, tied for third on 20 pts each were three teams- Compagnia Della Vela of Venice, the YC Gaeta and Circolo Della Vela Bellano

    The secret of success, according to the Società Canottieri Garda Salò, was getting good clean starts.

    "These are short races,” explains Enrico Fonda, “our goal in every race was to start fast and lead at the top mark.  However, sometimes it does not always work that way!” (he said laughing).

    The Società Canottieri Garda Salò has a team composed of ten sailors that rotate into the various regattas to represent the club.

    "We did not train a lot together, but we are all expert sailors and we know the J/70’s well. Plus, Lago di Garda is perfect for racing, and the Pelèr, which is shiftier and puffier, is much more tactical, something I prefer to beat our opponents!”

    On the final day, nine more races were sailed to complete the regatta.  In the morning, the Pelèr did not show up! But around midday, the Ora blew in from the south around 10 kts for a fun and exciting finale for the regatta.

    The Società Canottieri Garda Salò team (Pietro Corbucci, Stefano Raggi, Diego Franchini, & Enrico Fonda) won the Act 2 in Malcesine.  Second place was Circolo Canottieri Aniene (Luca Tubaro, Simone Spangaro, Matteo Mason, & Davide Tizzano- who was Olympic Gold for rowing). Third place went to Compagnia Della Vela of Venice (Paolo Acinapura, Salvatore Eulisse, Alessandro Banci, Andrea Tedesco, & Jacopo Paier).

    "Our victory”, commented Enrico Fonda, “came thanks to a fantastic and prepared team. We had a goal, to always start well and win, and we were always focused to achieve it, this was the key to guaranteeing the consistency of content necessary to conclude in first place.”

    "The second stage of Lega Italiano Vela selection,” commented President Roberto Emanuele de Felice, “goes into the history books after a set of extremely closely fought races, perhaps the hardest battles in the history of LIV. We have experienced challenging conditions, fast racing, and choppy waves- fantastic sailing!”  Follow the Italian J/70 Sailing League on Facebook, watch sailing video highlight here   For more Italian J/70 Sailing League sailing information
     

    VW De Twee Provincien Wins @ Aalsmeer
    WV Almere Centraal Leads Dutch J/70 Sailing League Series
    (Aalsmeer, Netherlands)- On the Westeinderplassen in Aalsmeer, the third act of the Eredivisie Sailing (the Dutch J/70 National Sailing League) took place over a gorgeous summer weekend of sailing on the lake for the fifteen teams from across the Netherlands. Mother nature did not make it easy for them; a variable wind forced the Race Committee to change the course in almost every race to make a fair race possible. And, that is how it went for the rest of the weekend.  Light and variable in the morning and hoping the afternoon seabreeze would kick in faster.

    Leading after the first day with three straight bullets was WV Almere Centraal. Willem Jan van Dort, skipper of WV Almere Centraal explains, "These are difficult conditions today, with many unexpected wind shifts on the track. We realize that you could literally win or lose a race in the last few meters before the finish, because of the many williwaws on the track. We made reasonable good starts, but were not always the best. Then, it is a nice battle to continue to sail forward in the field. But, good defense is also important, because today the difference is made on a tactical level. Tomorrow will not be different, as they again predict light weather, so it will be exciting again!"

    Day two was set to start on time at 0900 hours, however sailing was postponed due to a lack of wind.  By midday, the breeze filled in and the race committee managed to run twelve more races on Saturday, bringing the total number of races to twenty-one.

    It was an exciting day on the water. For a long time WV Almere Centraal seemed to hold their lead firmly in their hands, but in the last race they finished last and eventually fell to second place on the leaderboard. Jachtclub Scheveningen managed to pass the reigning champion with a few victories and a second place.

    Tom Kerkhof from Jachtclub Scheveningen explains their position enthusiastically, "We are happy to be in first place. We had a good start today with two first places. Then, we suddenly finished last, which shows that you should never think you are too confident. Fortunately, we were able to finish with a 2nd place in the last race and, thus, take the lead in the rankings. We look forward to tomorrow!"

    Jachtclub Scheveningen battled hard and took over the lead from WV Almere Centraal, sitting atop the leaderboard with 15 points total. Behind them, three teams were tied on 16 pts each- WV Almere Centraal, RR&ZV Maas & Roer (Roermond), and the women’s SHE SAILS team sailing for the International Yacht Club Amsterdam.

    The last day was epic, battles all over the race course and it was never clear until the last flight and set of races when the winner was determined.  And, to keep everyone breathless with anticipation until the end, the winners and the balance of the top five were determined on tie-breakers!  Talk about an anxiety-ridden day!  Every tack, every gybe, every spinnaker set and takedown was crucial to extract every millimeter of advantage to get consistent scores.

    Sunday started just like the previous two days: a weak variable wind that forced the 15 sailing teams to wait for the side. Race leader Alex Hoeve had already put everything in position to be able to sail immediately as soon as the wind allowed. Around 11:30 the first race could be started and it soon became clear that the wind attracted a lot and a sailing spectacle could be expected. Nine races were squeezed out on Sunday, where sailing team VWDTP managed to win three times in a row in their races. The Amsterdam ladies were on the same course, but left precious points in their last race and thus lost the highest step on the podium. Almere Central managed to keep up after a restless Saturday with varying results and eventually became overall third.

    Skipper of the winning VWDTP team- Arthur Kluppel- said enthusiastically: "It feels fan-tas-tic to win this event! It has been a real reward for working. Friday we started too cautiously and at that moment were leaving points in the light weather. As a team, we then agreed to take more risks at the start and in the runway. From that moment on, we sailed no fewer than 6 first places! Laying down after a start is disastrous, you will no longer make up for that because of the high level of the sailing teams. In the results, you see that well back, the points are awfully close together. Until the last moment, it was the bottom pinching for us. The Amsterdam ladies could still pass us in the overall ranking if they had finished their last race just a bit better! "

    The Groningers and Almere Centraal will sail the 2nd semi-final of the Sailing Champions League from 3 to 6 August against the best international teams from the comparable international competition. "We are curious how we can relate to this force field, we are going to see it! But winning this round of games in Aalsmeer on the way to the semi-finals gives a lot of confidence. We will train for another weekend and then do our utmost in Russia! "

    Perhaps the most notable performance of the entire weekend was the women’s SHE SAILS team sailing for International Yacht Club Amsterdam.  The nailed four 1sts in a row and nearly pulled off the overall win, much to the delight of their wildly cheering fans!

    “We were right there! But, it just did not turn out for us at the last minute! But, we finally succeeded in getting onto the podium! We had good boat handling and tactics this weekend and the team also managed to switch well and anticipate the circumstances. At the beginning of the weekend, our results were also somewhat variable, but we started to sail more consistently, with a few nice victories. Unfortunately, we did not cash in on the gold medal during the last race. We were in a huge fight with WV De Meeuwen on the water in the last race. If we had not had this battle, we might have ended up a place higher and won the regatta.  However, we are very happy with our 2nd place,” commented a happy and smiling Fettje Osinga.

    The women’s SHE SAILS teams ended up tied on points at 21 pts each with VW De Twee Provincien, losing the tie-breaker on the countback based on most 1sts.  Third place went to the defending Dutch J/70 Sailing League champions- WV Almere Centraal with 22 points.  The balance of the top five was also determined on a tie-breaker on 23 pts each, with WV De Meeuwen (Leeuwarden) taking 4th and Jachtclub Scheveningen finishing 5th.

    As a result of the Aalsmeer regatta, WV Almere Centraal continues to lead the overall standings after three events with a total of 56 pts (low point scoring, all races count).  Just one point back in 2nd is RR&ZV Maas & Roermond and sitting in 3rd is Jachtclub Scheveningen with 58 pts.  Never has one regatta and the overall standings been so close in the history of the Dutch J/70 Sailing League- it’s exciting, close racing as all the teams have raised their game to a much higher, and more consistent, level.   Watch the interview of the SHE SAILS Women’s team on Facebook here   Sailing photo credits- Jasper van Staveren
    For more Dutch J/70 Sailing League information
     

    RORC Morgan Cup Becomes Drift-A-Thon!
    (Cowes, Isle of Wight, England)- Although light winds were predicted for the race, the fleet experienced the remnants of a westerly sea breeze for the Squadron Line start, lasting long enough for a twilight exit from the Solent. Calms and complex local effects during the night, made observation and experience of light airs racing paramount. As night fell, the breeze dropped significantly resulting in somewhat of a park up off Portland Bill, giving an advantage to the higher rated IRC boats that had made the tidal gate. However, close to Midsummer the night was short, dawn broke before 5 a.m. and the lower IRC rated yachts enjoyed longer daylight racing with enhanced breeze. For many of the top boats, after passing Portland Bill, those that stayed offshore found more breeze than the inshore boats.

    In the IRC 1 division, Nick Angel’s J/121 ROCK LOBSTER finished fourth in an elapsed time of 23:24:29- nearly a full 24 hour day for such a short race! Many boats reported kedging to not lose distance to the finish using 300 feet of anchor line!

    In IRC 2 division, Andy Theobald’s J/122 R&W placed 4th and the famous French J/133 PINTIA, sailed by Gilles Fournier and Corinne Migraine, took fifth!  A tough race indeed for such a crackerjack crew!

    Then, the J/109s had an equally challenging time in IRC 3 division, Chris Preston’s JUBILEE taking 4th and Rob Cotterill’s MOJO RISIN happy to get 5th in the painfully slow drift-a-thon.  For more RORC Morgan Cup Race sailing information
     

    Vic-Maui Race Underway
    J/122E JOYRIDE Amongst The Leaders!
    (Victoria, British Columbia, Canada)- The Victoria to Maui International Yacht Race, hosted by the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club and the Lahaina Yacht Club, got underway July 1st. The 2,308nm course goes from Victoria, British Columbia to Maui, Hawaii.

    The lone J/Crew sailing the race is the gorgeous J/122E JOYRIDE from Seattle, WA skippered by her owner- John Murkowski. They are one of the most successful offshore racing teams in the Pacific Northwest. Here are the latest updates below.

    Day 5
    Day 5 Roll Call finds the boats generally about 550 miles west of the Oregon/California border and the leaders are now about 1500 miles from Hawaii. But the winds are easing. This is definitely the Middle Sea and the most difficult part of the race to figure out. The fleet continues to chase the sweet spot between the Pacific High and Low Pressure trough well west of the Rhumb Line; with most boats 75 miles west of the direct route and Anjo and Serenite another 75 miles west of that.

    The wind was generally strong overnight after the trough passed and most boats were beam-reaching speeds of 8 kts or more. But the wind has now abated with most boats seeing wind from the NW about 15 kts, and speeds have slowed accordingly. JOY RIDE is still vying for the lead for line honors, while winning on handicap.

    Day 6
    Day 6 Roll Call finds the fleet well offshore and now about 750 miles off Cape Mendocino and still sailing west of the direct route to Maui.  But this morning’s Weather Eye lays out the myriad of issues facing the fleet as all boats look to pick the right weather route, with choosing the wrong window likely to be costly.

    Boats are reporting sailing in lighter conditions that yesterday. But, more importantly, the “Tuna Challenge” was issued yesterday by Oxomoxo, and it was answered on JOY RIDE within minutes of putting out the lure. No word on how bloody the decks got. Also, reporting tuna on board are Turnagain and Kraken again.

    Day 7
    This afternoon, the fleet looks to be sailing on starboard tack with W-NW winds in the 7-13 knot range.  Barometric pressures reportedly range from 1022 – 1025, with some dubious outlier readings from boats whose barometer calibrations may have fallen off the pre-start job list.  All the boats appear to be navigating a fine line to avoid light air on their left (to the East) and to stay in pressure either ahead or to their right, on the slope of the High (to the West).

    Conditions onboard the boats are reported as warmer and drier, with a more-than-faint whiff of tuna on some boats and gray whales near other boats.  It looks like tomorrow will be the half way mark for a number of boats; traditionally there are some wild and wacky celebrations that are sometimes akin to a sailor’s traditional equatorial crossing.  With the magic of modern wireless communications, photographs, including drone images, and stories have been coming ashore from the boats and appearing on blogs and social media including the Vic-Maui Facebook group at www.facebook.com/vmiyr/

    Day 8
    Most of the fleet reached the halfway point in last 24 hours, or will shortly. It is certainly a time for celebrations aboard (and perhaps the first shower in a week). But it is also time to contemplate how far the boats are from anything - nearest land is over 1000 miles away. But from now on, the nearest land will be Hawaii – how good is that?

    The weather seems to have improved and with boats now at the latitude of Carmel, it is certainly warmer and most boats report that the foulies are finally starting to come off. There are some complaints about the lack of spinnaker sailing (as promised in the brochure) with boats reporting they are close reaching with Code 0 sails in 10-15 kts of wind. And they could use more wind.

    The trade winds and the promised spinnaker run to Hawaii are out there, but there is still a zone of changeable winds ahead that needs to be navigated. This race to Maui will be determined by who gets to those trade winds and hoist the spinnaker first.

    Day 9
    The trade wind run under spinnaker to Hawaii beckons, but more changeable winds are still in the way of the Vic-Maui fleet. The boats are stuck in a form of purgatory close reaching in wind speeds are fluctuating from non-existent to 12 kts – not exactly prime conditions for an ocean race. And the boats are soooo tired of seeing the white sails hoisted on a perpetual starboard tack and are getting frustrated by the time it is taking to make southing to the trade wind latitudes. And they are getting nervous, as everyone has now figured out that the boat that finds the right path to the trades will likely win the race.

    And they are now clearly in the North Pacific Gyre (aka the Garbage Patch) with JOY RIDE quite surprised by the amount of plastic garbage floating by. With Salient also report seeing lots of whales, you have to wonder how our leviathan friends are faring in a sea of fish nets, plastic cups and other urban detritus.  And, JOY RIDE is about 923nm away from Hawaii.

    Day 10
    Day 10 finds the boats doing everything to eek out a mile and get closer to the promised trade winds. At one time this morning, the three leading boats were all pointed to Baja, doing 1 kt with an ETA sometime next year! LOL!

    As the Weather Eye said this morning, "the cookie will crumble based on hard work, skill, and luck".   Follow the Vic-Maui Race here on Facebook  Watch “live” real-time YB Tracker of the fleet here   For more Vic-Maui Offshore Race sailing information
     

    Pacific Cup Starts in Big Breeze
    (San Francisco, CA)- Fresh winds, reported by weather authorities as sustained in the high 20s on the beam made for a demanding first night for the 29 original starters of the Pacific Cup to Hawaii- a.k.a. the “fun race to Hawaii”! Race veterans compare last night’s conditions to the 2002 and 2016 races that were marked by unusually stiff breezes.

    Following the four starts on Tuesday, there are 30 more teams that will get underway during the three more additional start days on July 11th, 12th, and 13th.

    In the DH2 Mount Gay Rum doublehanded division, Sean and Kim Mulvihill on their J/120 JAMANI are certainly on the right horse for the course in the early stages of this race, with their J/120 effectively leading the doublehanded division. The J/105 ABSTRACT sailed by Doug Pihlaja and Mary Hartel is not that far beyond, loving the heavy reaching conditions as well.

    There are J/crews in three more classes that will be starting soon.  PHRF Class B (Weems & Plath) has Karl Haflinger’s J/35 SHEARWATER racing with his crew of Jim Ianelli (Navigator), Stewart Putnam, David Smullin, and Alan Johnson.

    PHRF Class C (Alaska Airlines) has Phil Wampold’s J/92 ZAFF racing with his Canadian crew of Kieran Horsburgh (Watch Captain), Ansel Koehn (Foredeck), and Paul Mais (Navigator).

    And, ORR Class D (Pasha Hawaiian) has Tracy Rogers’ J/120 HOKULANI sailing with his crew of John Dillow (Navigator), Cris Sena, and Mike Mahoney.   Follow them all on the YB Tracker here  And, follow the news on the Pacific Cup Facebook page here.  For more Pacific Cup Race sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
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    * Ten Socio-Emotional Benefits of Sailing- by Samantha Yom, Singapore Sailing

    There’s something about sailing that makes it quite unlike other sports. More than just skill and strategy, it teaches certain values that shape sailors into the unique athletes that they are.

    Yet, we’re often so focused on the physical aspects of sailing that we forget how much we stand to gain from the sport – both socially and emotionally. So here’s a list of the top 10 socio-emotional benefits of sailing.

    1. Grit & Determination
    You could say that just about any sport offers a lesson on resilience, but sailing is a sport that demands an inner strength far greater than most.

    In this sport, it’s sailor versus the elements. Whether you’re a novice experiencing strong winds for the first time or a national sailor met with three-meter high waves in foreign waters, you learn to keep fighting – no matter how uncomfortable it is. Capsize? Just upright your boat and keep sailing.

    2. Confidence
    Most sailors’ foray into the sport begins with the Optimist. It’s a single-handed boat, which means it’s controlled by a sole sailor. Alone on the boat, sailors – as young as six or seven – are constantly required to make their own decisions. They don’t always make the right ones, but the opportunity to think for themselves helps them grow in self-confidence.  Once you’ve conquered three-meter high waves, you can do almost anything.

    3. Teamwork
    Though they sail individually, sailors are forced to work together from day one. After all, no one sailor can lift his or her Optimist boat alone. Over time, sailors gradually realize that working together not only helps speed things up, but also allows them to learn more from one another.

    4. Friendship
    Perhaps one of the most valuable takeaways from sailing is the friendships forged. It’s inevitable that sailors bond with one another during windless days and scary storms. You also get to make new friends with international sailors as well, especially during those international regattas.

    5. Sportsmanship
    Touched a mark without anyone catching you in the act? Complete your penalty anyway. Sailing is a self-governing sport, which means it’s completely up to sailors to abide by the rules and uphold the fairness of racing. It’s a matter of integrity and sailors learn the importance of playing fair and respecting the rules of the game.
    ------------------------
    6. Learning to Lose
    In sailing, the conditions are ever-changing. Regattas are held over a few days and every day presents a different sailing condition. As a result, positions are always changing during a regatta – and even during a race itself. Unpredictable conditions also mean that you could go from leading a race to coming in dead last.

    You can’t win every single race in sailing, so sailors learn to accept defeat and move on – a particularly important skill since races are held back-to-back.

    7. Patience
    Whether it’s mastering a sailing maneuver or waiting for the next wind shift, sailing is a test of patience. Sailing maneuvers are so complex that it could take weeks of practice to execute them well, consistently.

    8. Responsibility
    Sailing is a sport that requires a fair bit of equipment. From bringing your sunglasses, gloves and wind indicator to cleaning your boat before a regatta – sailors learn to take ownership of their equipment from the very start of their sailing journey. They learn to be responsible for their decisions as well – be it a bad tactical decision or a sail setting.

    9. Managing Emotions
    As we’ve mentioned previously, sailing conditions can be quite unpredictable. It is through experiences of winning and losing that sailors gradually learn to control their emotions. They find ways to deal with their feelings when they’re alone on the boat – the joy, frustration, et cetera. At the end of the day, the best sailors are the ones who are able to best manage their emotions and prevent them from affecting their performance.

    10. Discipline
    Due to its nature, sailing can be quite a time-consuming sport. It takes up a significant amount of time on the weekends too – precious time that could be spent on school work or with friends. That being said, it builds a sense of discipline in sailors, as they learn to prioritize the little time they have and stay focused.

    Summary
    And with that, we realize how sailing is not just a sport that keeps you fit, but also one that develops you into a well-rounded individual – something far more important than winning medals.
    Add to Flipboard Magazine.

    Read more...
  • J/Newsletter- July 4th, 2018 J/80 World Championship Preview
    (Les Sables d’Olonne, France)- “Being a serial pioneer of nautical events, eager to innovate and energize the sailing community, as well as our Vendée territory, the Sports Nautiques Sablais YC has the immense pleasure of welcoming the J/80 World Championship from the 7th to the 18th July 2018 in the home port of the 'Vendée Globe Challenge’!

    It is a great privilege for us to host a seventy-boat fleet crewed by more than 400 sailors, from nine nations that will be racing for five days in the bay of Les Sables d'Olonne.

    I am delighted and thankful to Ludovic Gilet, Chairman of the French J/80 Class. And, I would also like to thank all those who support us in this adventure: WORLD SAILING and the French Sailing Federation (FFV), our institutional and corporate partners. I cannot fail to mention the organizing committee, led by Bernard Devy, our honorary president and friend. And … let the best team win,” commented Michel Poitevineau, Commodore of SNSYC.

    The J/80 World Championship will be an all-out battle between the top French and Spanish teams that have been at the top of the J/80 class for quite some time.  In addition, there are top British and Dutch teams that are hoping to tip that balance in their favor by the end of the regatta. The nations that are represented include France (59), Spain (6), Netherlands (3), Russia (1), Belgium (2), Oman (2), Ireland (1), Portugal (1), and Great Britain (4)- missing are the top teams from the USA, Germany, and Scandinavia.

    Watch for these teams to be a factor in the overall regatta leaderboard. The top French crews hoping to defend their home town honors should be Simon Moriceau’s ARMEN HABITAT, Patrick Bot’s ECOLE NAVALE CG 29, Luc Nadal’s GAN’JA, Sylvain Pellisier’s INTUITIVE SAILS, and Ludovic Gilets’ FRA 797.

    Challenging the local French teams will be Great Britain (Nick & Annie Haigh’s SLIGHTLY STEAMY & Jon Powell’s BETTY); Spain (Inigo Jauregui’s GARATU, Rayco Tabares’ HOTEL PRINCESA YAIZA, & Javier Chacartegui’s IBO.ES); Netherland’s Otte Jan Golverdingen’s LED2LEASE; Ireland’s Patrick O’Neill on MOJO; Russia’s Alexei Semenov racing NEW TERRITORIES; and OMAN SAIL’s team of Helena Lucas.

    There is a very strong contingent of women skippers participating; Julie Simon’s CDV 22- IMAGO; Clara & Lucie Scheiwiller’s CLICK & BOAT- LADIES NORMANDIE; Corentin Kieffer’s CN SAINT CAST CDV 22; Maxime Rousseaux’s CN ST CAST GRAND OUEST ETIQUETTES; Elodie Bonafous’ ECOLE NAVALE CDV 29; Claire Ferchaud’s ELITE APRIL MARINE- SN SABLAIS; Elisabeth Cabus Bordron’s IFI DEVELOPMENT OUEST; Isabelle Maggiar’s LES MISSMERS DE L’OUEST; Stephanie Puyraud’s MODERN BALEINE; Anne Phelipon’s NAVIGATLANTIQUE; and Claire Montecot’s STARTIJENN.

    In addition, there are two “Youth Under 25” teams that include Theo Carayon’s VITEL COTES D’ARMOR SAILING TEAM and Laure Buffiere’s TEAM VENDEE.    Follow the J/80 World Championships on Facebook here   For more J/80 World Championship sailing information
     



    Round the Island Race Preview
    (Cowes, Isle of Wight, England)- If it is the first weekend in July, it must be time for the world-famous “Round Island Race” in the United Kingdom, hosted by the Island Sailing Club in Cowes, Isle of Wight.  The challenging 60nm race that goes around the Isle of Wight is by far the most popular race on any sailor’s social calendar all year long in the U.K.; particularly for those that love to get thrashed and challenged by the intricacies of the Solent.

    As has been the case for over a decade, over a thousand boats will begin starting at 0630 hrs.  First off is the IRC Zero class, followed by over two-dozen more classes sailing across the glorious Royal Yacht Squadron line in the summer morning soft orange light.  It should be absolutely gorgeous for the thousands of sailors aboard all the teams making their annual, epic adventure around the Isle of Wight.

    On Saturday, the High pressure system should be over the center of the U.K., with a light NE to start, veering SE or even S during the afternoon depending where you are. It will be hot & sunny, so apart from the sunburn danger, thermal effects and possible sea breeze cell developments, it will be a very tactical day. In other words, no chance of any records getting broken from a sailing standpoint, more like a recipe for maximum sunburn/ tanning opportunities.

    Taking on the challenge will be a veritable J/Navy sailing across the spectrum of classes.  In the world of IRC handicap classes, here are some of the notable teams to watch.

    In the 25-boat IRC 0 Class will be the J/121 ROCK LOBSTER. Following them is IRC 1A comprised of mostly J/111s and J/122s.  Those teams are the following, J/111’s (JITTERBUG, JOURNEYMAKER II, KESTREL, & SNOW LEOPARD), J/122’s (JAHMALI, JOLLY JELLYFISH, KAYA, R&W, & JANGLE), the J/133 ASSARAIN IV, and the J/120 HANNAM & PARTNERS TEAM 3.

    Sailing in IRC 1B Class is the new J/122E JIB & TONIC. The dominating J/112E DAVANTI TYRES is sailing in IRC 1C.

    Sailing in IRC 2A Class are twelve J/109s- including JIRAFFE, JASSY JELLYFISH, JUKE BOX, and JUMPING JELLYFISH.

    Then, in IRC 2B Class are seven J/105s and six J/109s. J/105’s (JIN TONIC, JELLY BABY, JOS OF HAMBE, MOSTLY HARMLESS, REDEYE) and J/109’s (JINKS & JYBE TALKIN).

    Holding their own in IRC 2C Class is the J/92S UPSTART.  And, in the IRC 2D Class is the J/92 JABBERWOCK and the J/97’s (HIGH JINKS, JAYWALKER JET, & JUMBLESAIL 2).

    Planning to sail fast and stealthily in IRC 3A Class are the J/32 DOMAINE, J/92S’s (J’RONIMO, JACKDAW, LUNA, NIGHTJAR, SAMURAI J, & VAGABOND), the J/95 JUST IS, and two J/97’s (BLACKJACK II & JURA GB).

    In the world of Island Sailing Club handicap rules (ISC), there are a number of J/crews participating.  In ISC 4A Class is the J/109 SQUIBS, in 4B Class is the J/92 JUST IN TIME, in 5B Class is the J/100 TIDERACE, and in the 6C Class are several J/24s (J-RIDER, JOBS FOR THE BUOYS, TEAM IMPACT RACING).

    In addition to the handicap classes, there are also one-design classes for the Round Island Race!

    In the J/88s you will fined top teams like J/DREAM, JONGLERU, RAGING BULL, SABRIEL JR, & TIGRIS.  In the J/80s there are JUMPIN JACK FLASH, JUNO, and JUSTIFY.  And, in the J/70s there are JENGA 8, JACKAL, RITA, JACKATOO, JINX, and a number of Royal Southern/ Royal Thames YC teams.  For more Round the Island Race sailing information
     

    SAIL NEWPORT Regatta Preview
    (Newport, RI)- For many sailors throughout the Northeastern seaboard, the best multi-class regatta of the season is “THE Newport Regatta”, hosted by SAIL NEWPORT, in conjunction with its supporters- New York YC, Ida Lewis YC, and Newport YC.

    There is no question the regatta’s motto is an enticing, fun-loving promotion for sailors of all stars and stripes- "Fast Racing, Cold Beer”!  As it has for the past three decades, it will continue in 2018!

    Shoreside after-race socials are planned for both Saturday and Sunday. On July 7th, you will be able to make your own custom taco at the famous “Taco Bar!”  Enjoy Heineken beer, Mt. Gay Rum, and Whispering Angel wine and live music. Sunday's awards party will include food, drinks, and prizes.

    Regatta Manager Matt Duggan and Event Manager Emily Greagori are also hosting the first annual Sail Newport Corn Hole Championship (SNCHC) on Saturday, July 7 at the tent. Start training now!!  All parties will be at the new building this year!!

    The J/70s will be repeating as the largest one-design class by far in Newport for the past two weekends.  Last week, the occasion was the New York YC One-Design Regatta.  This week, it’s another two-dozen boats that are racing as part of their pre-J/70 Worlds preparations that will be taking place in September off Marblehead, MA.

    Incredibly, there are at least a baker’s dozen teams that are all capable of top ten finishes in any J/70 Worlds that are participating this coming weekend. Three J/70 World Champions- Tim Healy’s USA 2, Joel Ronning’s CATAPULT, and Peter Duncan’s RELATIVE OBSCURITY.  That is for starters.  The other top teams include, Brian Keane’s SAVASANA (2nd in 2017 Worlds), Jud Smith’s AFRICA (World Champion crew), Glenn Darden’s HOSS, Martie Kullman’s HYDRA, Bruce Golison’s MIDLIFE CRISIS (West Coast Champion), Heather Gregg & Joe Bardenheier’s MUSE (first J/70 NA Champion and 1st World’s Corinthian Champion- tied 4th overall), Bennet Greenwald’s PERSEVERANCE, John Brim’s RIMETTE, Pam Rose’s ROSEBUD, and Hannah Swett’s SPARKLE (a Women’s World Champion). Watch the leaderboard this weekend!  For more Newport Regatta at SAIL Newport sailing information.
     

    J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    The first week of July always seems to be a cause for celebration somewhere around the world.  For the American’s, of course, the huge holiday week/ weekend celebrates Independence Day on July 4th with massive fireworks displays and all kinds of parades.  New York’s fireworks are easily the largest in America, with well over 75,000 shells blowing up in the span of an hour or so, all choreographed to music.  Canada celebrated its Canada Day/ Dominion Day on the 1st. Other notable celebrations include World UFO Day on the 2nd, World Bikini Day on the 5th, International Kissing Day on the 6th, Chocolate Day on the 7th, and, of course, the French celebrate Bastille Day on the 14th- “Vive La France”!

    Speaking about the French and Europeans, there was much to celebrate for the first French J/80 Sailing League event in Brest, France.  The regatta provided two qualifiers to the SAILING Champions League Finals in St. Moritz, Switzerland and two qualifiers to the SAILING Champions League Semi-Finals in St Petersburg, Russia (both sailed on fleets of twelve J/70s). Then, up north in Scandinavia, the Norwegian J/70 Nationals took place in the gorgeous seaside resort village of Hanko, Norway; hosts were the Royal Norwegian Yacht Club (KNS) and Hankø Yacht Club.

    Over in the Americas, we got the report from Rich Stearns on sailing the J/88 in the Mackinac Solo Challenge race, 289nm from Chicago, IL to Mackinac Island, MI on Lake Michigan- a race he did to raise Prostate Cancer Awareness. In Newport, RI, the New York YC One-Design Regatta included a very competitive fleet of thirty-seven J/70s, a light air event to say the least- a wind average of around 4.0 kts! Out West, the Victoria to Maui International Yacht Race, hosted by the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club and the Lahaina Yacht Club, got underway July 1st. The 2,308nm course goes from Victoria, British Columbia to Maui, Hawaii.

    Then, down in South America, the Chilean J/70 Autumn Championship Circuit qualified their three teams for sailing in the 2018 WEST MARINE J/70 World Championship in Marblehead, MA, hosted by Eastern YC.  Their third and final event took place off Algarrobo, Chile, hosted by the Cofradía Nautica del Algarrobo.

    Read on! The J/Community and Cruising section below has many entertaining stories and news about J/Sailors as well as cruising blogs about those who continue to enjoy the Caribbean and the South Pacific, staying warm while others are trying to stay warm up north.  Check them out!  More importantly, if you have more J/Regatta News, please email it or  upload onto our J/Boats Facebook pag  Below are the summaries.

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Jun 30- Vic-Maui International Yacht Race- Victoria, BC, Canada
    Jul 7-14- J/80 World Championship- Les Sables d’Olonne, France
    Jul 7- Round the Island Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    Jul 7-8- Sail Newport Regatta- Newport, RI
    Jul 12-15- Italian J/70 Cup- Malcesine, Italy
    Jul 12-14- Canadian J/70 National Championship- Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
    Jul 12-20- Offshore Sailing Worlds- The Hague, The Netherlands
    Jul 12-15- Vineyard Cup- Vineyard Haven, Martha’s Vineyard, MA
    Jul 13- Lake Ontario 300 Challenge Race- Port Credit, ONT, Canada
    Jul 13- RORC Cowes-Dinard-St Malo Race- St Malo, France
    Jul 14- Belles Beer Bayview Mackinac Race- Port Huron, MI
    Jul 16-21- New York YC Race Week- Newport, RI
    Jul 19-20- Edgartown Race Week- Edgartown, Martha’s Vineyard, MA
    Jul 19-22- Whidbey Island Race Week- Whidbey Island, WA
    Jul 20-29- Travemunde Race Week- Travemunde, Germany
    Jul 21- Chicago to Mackinac Race- Chicago, IL
    Jul 21- Edgartown Round Island Race- Edgartown, Martha’s Vineyard, MA
    Jul 21-22- Fiesta Cup- Santa Barbara, CA
    Jul 23-28- J/24 European Championship- Glucksburg, Germany
    Jul 26-29- Marblehead NOOD Regatta- Marblehead, MA
    Jul 26-29- J/105 North American Championship- Harbor Springs, MI
    Jul 26-29- J/35 North American Championship- Cheboygan, MI
    Jul 27-29- J/88 Great Lakes Championship- Youngstown, NY
    Jul 27- New England Solo-Twin- Newport, RI
    Jul 27- Santa Barbara to King Harbor Race- Santa Barbara, CA
    Jul 27-29- Ugotta Regatta- Harbor Springs, MI
    Jul 28-29- CanAm Regatta- Youngstown, NY
    Jul 28- RORC Channel Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

    J/88 Wins Mackinac Solo Challenge
    Racing to Raise Funds for Prostate Awareness
    (Mackinac Island, MI)- Recently, Richie Stearns sailed his J/88 HOKEY SMOKES in the annual Mackinac Solo Challenge, a 289nm adventure starting off Chicago, IL and sailed north up Lake Michigan to that famous jewel of horses and fudge residing in gorgeous azure blue waters between two Great Lakes (Michigan and Huron)- Mackinac Island.

    For many sailors in the Midwest, the races to Mackinac have a disarming allure, as if there is an invisible magnetic pull that weighs on your conscience, as sailors migrate almost “zombie-like” towards the island for a good dose of rest and relaxation on an island where time has seemingly stood still- just bikes and horse-drawn carriages to get you around the island.  And, of course, the majestic landmark that stands out like a white beacon on its southern cliffs, welcoming sailors from afar- the gorgeous Grand Hotel.  Stepping foot on the island is as close to anyone gets to take a walk back in time.  Here is Richie’s story about his solo racing experience in this year’s Mackinac Solo Challenge, winning his class and 5th overall:

    “Solo sailing has never been on my bucket list. I have sailed buoy races all my life.  I’ve been on an America’s Cup campaign and tried out for the Olympics.  I’ve done two double-handed Mackinac races and 44 crewed Mac races. I sailed with Buddy Melges for years and when asked why he doesn’t sail singlehanded or long-distance races, his reply always was “why would I want to sail overnight with a bunch of guys when I can go home to a warm bed and my wife Gloria?” That always seemed like good advice.

    However, after a bout with prostate cancer, I thought it might help survivors to see someone doing crazy things, and show them that Prostate cancer is not the end of the world. So, I decided to undertake the challenge to raise money for Prostate cancer awareness and information.

    One of the cool things about sailing in general, is there are so many ways to enjoy it. Cruising, racing, single-handed, double-handed and sailing with crew all lead to great times and memories.

    You would think solo sailing would be for people who want to get away from it all. That is not exactly true, the Great Lakes Single-handed Society is a group of passionate sailors who use solo sailing as a shared passion. They are there for the challenge, but they also sail to be “with” the other competitors. They talk to each other on their VHF radios to make sure they are OK, or just to find out if there is any wind, or how they are feeling. After the race, everyone helps put the boats away and everyone comes to the parties to talk sailing and about the experience. It is similar to a fleet or a class that promotes camaraderie, except there seems to be more pride in the accomplishment of doing it solo (and rightly so!).

    The conditions were perfect for a J/88 at the 0900 hrs start on Saturday. With light air and the Code 0 up, all but one boat was out of sight behind “Hokey Smoke” after a few hours. Boats started to drop out early, either with electrical issues or Autohelm issues (code for “this race will take too long…I’m dropping out").

    The first night brought cold air and fog. I have no idea what the temperature was, but 40 F. to 50 F. is my guess. The wind built all night to 15 to 20 kts on the nose, sailing straight upwind to Point Betsie (the first major turning point). As the waves grew to 3-4 ft+, I realized I had never used the tiller pilot to steer the boat in those conditions. These are short steep Lake Michigan waves, not long ocean waves. I am sure there is a way to calibrate it, but it was too late for me. The steering system just could not compensate for the waves and over corrected until it just auto-tacked the boat. An auto-tack while singlehanding in waves catches you off guard. Getting things back under control is tough enough rested, but without sleep and at 10:00 am and 25 hours into the race it makes you think twice about what you are doing.

    The Autohelm is the driver, but you are the only crew. I had done quite a few sail changes early on in the race and found running around on a 29-foot boat in 4-foot + waves gets a bit tiring.

    The J/88 is a fantastic boat in light air, but with the breeze on and going upwind, it definitely needs crew weight on the rail.

    With the tiller pilot problem, I had already lost my lead. By later afternoon Sunday, the big heavy boats were quickly catching me. I had to get out of the waves and hope the autopilot would work in order for me to get some rest. It took hours to get to the eastern shore and out of the big waves. There were fewer waves there, but almost no wind. I could tell by the conversation on the radio and the call-in positions that a few of the big boats had gotten by me.

    At this point, about 150 miles into the race I kept hearing more boats drop out. It is an appealing idea when you have sailed for 40 hours on a heavy beat and are only halfway there.  Once I got closer to shore, the waves were less and the tiller pilot worked again.  I set my course and went to sleep for an hour or so.  I may have lost additional ground to the others, but I needed the sleep more!

    By late on Sunday (36 hours into the race), I had passed Point Betsie and I was entering the Manitou Passage.  Once you get into the passage, you are surrounded by islands and the sea conditions are no longer a problem.

    There was not a boat in sight.  The lead two boats were 10 miles ahead and the others were 10 miles behind me. With smooth water, I was able to get more rest. Probably, too much rest, but the tiller pilot steered fine and the day was beautiful. Just setting the course from one side of the straights to the other with long two-hour tacks made for a great day…and it was warm and dry (the dodger was a life-saver on this race)!

    Going into the third night on Monday, it was cold again, but the air was dry, making life on deck much nicer.

    I suppose this is what singlehanded sailors come out for. A steady breeze of 8 to 10 knots, fairly smooth water and a full moon. Yes, it is time to reflect how nice things are, how good life is and how much fresh water is in this darn lake? I was close enough to land to use my cell phone and used Google to found out there is 1,000,000,000,000,000 gallons (one quadrillion) of fresh water in the lake.  Lake Michigan does seem big when you are alone on a 29-foot boat.

    Through the night I was able to get updated on my position.  The boats from behind were catching me and I was catching the boats in front. I had already halved their lead after rounding Can 3 at Grays Reef, which is a mark of the course before you head east down the Straits of Mackinac to Mackinac Island. You would think when you take an 80 degree turn you would be on a reach, but it was my luck to get a shift to the east and, instead, got more beating into the wind! The J/88 was performing great with 8 to 10 knots of breeze and smooth water the boat just flew along. I was treated with the sunrise of a lifetime when I got to the Mackinac Bridge and made my last tack to the finish line.

    When you are alone the work isn’t over at the finish. Someone still has to put things away and that person was me. In an early morning blur, and after over 70 hours of sailing, the main gets flaked and the jib gets rolled up.  Fenders and dock lines are put out. It is over.

    It’s just after dawn and onshore people are just getting up.  However, my wife Lori has been there waiting so I have someone to help dock the boat. Then, it’s straight to sleep for a few hours followed by my first hot meal in days.

    I sailed Stearns Boating’s stock J/88 to Mackinac Island. I had a main, one jib (light medium), and two spinnakers (Code 0 and a regular spinnaker). The J/88 proved to be a great boat to sail singlehanded in all conditions. It is easy-to-handle and fairly comfortable. It is very dry, and in most conditions might be the boat of choice for singlehanded sailing. Having one jib was a blessing in that I did not have to change sails, however J/88’s are much faster with their smaller #4 jib up. I reefed the boat quite a bit and the reef really helped. Upwind with a tiller pilot the boat has to be trimmed/ balanced perfectly, then the tiller pilot does well. If the boat is not balanced, the tiller pilot has a hard time steering straight.

    I finished the race and raised over $10,000 for Prostate Cancer awareness, you can still help!  Please help more men understand prostate cancer!”   To learn more about Prostate cancer awareness, please go here.   Please make a donation here- University of Chicago/ Medicine & Biological Sciences   Kattack tracker for the J/88 HOKEY SMOKES in the Mackinac Solo Challenge.
     

    NORWEGIAN STEAM Smokes Norwegian J/70 Nationals
    (Hanko, Norway)- GRUNDIG Hankø Race Week is one of Norway's most famous annual regattas, and one of the summer's absolute highlights for sailing in Eastern Norway. Hankø is renowned for its good sailing conditions and location, and has been a focal point for sailors from home and abroad for more than a hundred years. The Royal Norwegian Yacht Club (KNS) collaborates with Hankø Yacht Club, founded by a bunch of adult sailors from KNS in 1954. Idyllic Hankø Yacht Club (HYC) is well protected from wind and on the other side of the bay lays the guest harbor and the royal Norwegian family cottage- “Bloksberg”.

    Perhaps more importantly, Hankø's climate made the island attractive for summer holidays in the 20th century, and laid the foundation for what is today the Hankø spa hotel.  The venue is famous in Scandinavia for hosting numerous World Cup, Nordic Championship and National Norwegian Championships.

    For 2018, the KNS hosted the J/70 Norwegian Championship, the world’s fastest growing, and leading sportsboat class.  For the first Norwegian Nationals, a baker’s dozen boats participated to compete for the nation’s bragging rights as top team.

    In the end, it was the most experienced J/70 team in Norway, Eivind Astrup’s NORWEGIAN STEAM, that was crowned Norwegian J/70 Champion after posting a very consistent scoreline of 2-4-1-2-2-2-1-3-1 for 14 pts net. Giving them a run-for-the-money with near identical scores was Jorn-Erik Ruud’s NOR 1242 from Moss Seilforening Club with a tally of 3-1-3-1-1-3-4-2-2 for 16 pts net.  Rounding out the podium was Magne Klann’s VIEW SOFTWARE from Soon Seilforening with a record of 1-3-2-3-5-4-8-4-3 for 25 pts net.
    For more Norwegian J/70 Nationals sailing information
     

    SANTANDER Wins Tiebreaker @ Algarrobo
    WINDMADE Crowned Chilean J/70 Autumn Circuit Champion
    (Algarrobo, Chile)- In the last weekend of June, six races were sailed for the Autumn Championship, hosted by Cofradía Náutica Algarrobo, off the Pacific Coast of Chile.

    Seventeen J/70 showed up at the starting line, thanks to the delay of the incoming winter and the lack of snow in the Andes Mountains ski resorts. It is true, many J/70 sailors are also snow skiing fans but the fun-in-the-sun on the ocean was far more appealing!

    As the sun rays dawned over the snow-capped peaks of the Andes mountains to the east on Saturday morning, it was clear the wind was a “no show” for the first part of the day, leading to a postponement until the early afternoon.  Nevertheless, a cold and nice breeze from the west started blowing around 2:30pm.  Three races were sailed with winds ranging from 10 to 13 knots.  It could have been a cold winter day of sailing, but the nice winter sun and the tight racing made the atmosphere warmer than expected.

    From the beginning, the battle between Pablo Amunategui’s SANTANDER and Juan Reid’s WINDMADE started in the first race. In the first beet, WINDMADE (J/70 hull #001) managed to get in front after SANTANDER tried (and failed) to do lee bow getting to the 1st weather mark. On the 2nd beat, SANTANDER chose the left, tacking immediately after rounding the leeward gate.  A good left line of breeze gave them the advantage on the second windward leg. The final result of the 1st race- 1st SANTANDER and 2nd WINDMADE.  In short, that was the summary of the close racing between these two boats all weekend.

    The conditions for sailing were very nice.  In general, the left side is favored in the westerly winds, but that was not the case this weekend.  As a result, the fleet could spread out and play windshifts and breeze lines across the race course.

    The second race of the day was a lot more complicated for SANTANDER, finishing 13th while WINDMADE finished 5th.  First was Pedro Cabezón (Corinthians and very new skipper in the class!!) and second, again, was Diego Gonzalez’s SENSEI.

    For the third race of the day, Reid’s WINDMADE won handily, followed Cristobal Molina’s LEXUS in second and Matias Seguel’s VOLVO in third.  The day closed with WINDMADE leading, followed by SENSEI in second and VOLVO in third place.

    The weather forecast for Sunday was complicated, some rain during the morning, but the day continued to get better than expected. The breeze start blowing from the north at 8-12 kts, with tricky, choppy seas (north seas comes directly from offshore) and that made for a challenging race course with difference in pressure and direction.  The seas were very difficult to steer on starboard tack, as you were going perpendicular to the wave train!

    It was close racing all day long Sunday. Pablo Amunategui & Rodrigo Guzman’s SANTANDER sailed clean, posting a 1-3-2. With three great starts and perfect tactics/ strategy, they deserved their excellent results.

    Meanwhile, WINDMADE struggled a bit on the last day, with finishes of 7-1-3.  In fact, in the last race, Reid’s WINDMADE had a bad start and made an amazing recovery (thanks to great tactics from Rodrigo Amunátegui) to get the third place.

    With six races, one discard race came into play.  On total points, WINDMADE won, but with discards, both WINDMADE and SANTANDER were tied with identical records of 1-1-2-3-5 at 12 pts each.  Amazing! Shocking! In any event, “c’est la vie, c’est la guerre”!  It came down to “who-beat-who” in the last race, tipping that advantage to SANTANDER over WINDMADE. Rounding out the podium was Diego Gonzalez’s SENSIE with 14 pts- the most consistent boat in the regatta, throwing out a 5th place and on straight points/ no throw-outs had won the regatta!  Tight racing to say the least for this trio.  The balance of the top five included Seguel’s VOLVO in 4th and Andres Ducasse’s TSUNAMI in 5th position.

    In the Corinthians division, there was just about a three-way tie for first!  Two cousins, and both Lightning skippers, Cristóbal Pérez on TRILOGIA and Francisco Pérez on ELEANOR RYGBY, both finished with 46 pts! That tiebreaker went in favor of TRILOGIA.  Just one point back with 47 pts was Paolo Molina’s ALBATROSS.

    After the Algarrobo event, the eighteen-race Chilean J/70 Autumn series concluded, with two discards permitted for overall results.  Crowned as champion was Juan Reid’s WINDMADE with 49 pts total. The silver went to Andres Ducasse’s TSUNAMI with 62 pts and the bronze to Pablo Amunategui’s SANTANDER with 67 pts.

    In the Corinthians Division, winning the Autumn Series was Pablo Cisternas’ UROBORO with 153 pts. Second was José Antonio Jiménez onboard JUMENEZ with 170 pts and third was Francisco Pérez skippering ELEANOR RYGBY scoring 183 pts.

    The Chilean J/70 class begins their Spring series on September 8th and 9th with one regatta per month until the middle of December (when the Summer Series commences). Twenty boats are expected for the Spring series.

    In the meantime, three teams are preparing to sail the 2018 J/70 World Championship in Marblehead, MA (Boston)- WINDMADE, TSUNAMI, and BLACK SAILS.
     

    APCC Voiles Sportive Top French J/80 Sailing League
    Moriceau’s Team The Best in Brest Big Time!
    (Brest, France)- Eighteen sailing club teams from across France participated in the first of three events in the 2018 French National Sailing League, supported by the F.I.V. (French National Sailing Federation).  The first regatta was hosted by USAM Brest, the next in La Rochelle by Societe Regate La Rochelle, and the third the SAILING Champions League qualifier in St. Petersburg, Russia from August 3rd to 6th.

    Of the eighteen sailing clubs from across France, the three principal Brest clubs were participating- Societe Regate Brest, Crocs L'Elorn and USAM Brest.  Five teams were from Normandy- Club Voiles Saint Aubin- Elbeuf, YC Granville, YC Cherbourg, and the two Le Havre clubs- Societe Regate Le Havre and the Societe Nautique Pointe Le Havre.  Interestingly, five of the clubs are from the inland lakes, such as Club Voiles Saint Aubin-Elbeuf.

    Day 1- Friday
    It was around 12:30pm that the first race was launched under the beautiful sun off Brest. Picture perfect conditions awaited the eighteen crews in the northeasterly winds of more than 10 knots.

    With a great big blue sky, the theme for the day could have been “Tropical Brest sailing” for the entire day. Twelve races were sailed, divided into four “flights”, each of the crews sailed four races.

    Last year, both sailing clubs from Le Havre (SNPH and the SRH) ended up tied at the end of the sailing league series, with NHP finishing in fourth place ahead of their rival club. This year, nothing has changed except the regatta location! Even far from their homeport, the two Le Havre clubs put on a good show and this time it was the crew of the SRH that took the lead with an amazing 1-2-1-2! Incredibly, behind them it was three-way tie on 7 pts each for second place between APCC Voiles Sportive Nantes (1-1-2-3), CV St Aubin- Elbeuf (2-2-1-2), and SNP Le Havre (1-1-3-2).

    The Daily ”SAP" Statistic
    121 meters. That was the distance where APCC Voile Sportive- Nantes team beat their closest opponent to the finish of the second flight of Flight 1. A considerable difference, when we know that the courses are rather short! Clearly, the people of Nantes are in Brest to get the win!

    The Tactical Maneuver of the Day
    That award goes to the young crew of YC Mauguio Carnon. Despite their fatigue, they arrived at 5am in Brest after more than 10 hours of driving on Friday to get to Brest! And, lack of experience in the J/80, the southerners made their talent speak for themselves, especially during a very nice maneuver during the 2nd race of the 1st Flight.

    5th at the 1st mark, the crew of YC Mauguio Carnon managed to "slip under the buoy" to take the inside and pass three competitors. Then, by managing to slide below them on the starboard gybe, they managed to prevent them from being able to gybe as leeward boat. Holding them past the layline to the leeward mark gates, they gybed first and forced their opponents to gybe after them and, thus, to line up behind them. As a result, they took 2nd in the race!

    Day 2- Saturday
    After an idyllic first day with perfect conditions in the Brest Bay, the 18 teams were back on the race track for another day of near perfect sailing conditions.  The goal was six races for each team!

    At the end of the day, a big sun and a gorgeous northeasterly wind between 10 and 15 knots permitted the six races per team and a total of 18 races!

    In the lead after the first day, the SRH's Le Havre fell behind on the rankings. On the contrary, their rivals at CV Saint-Aubin Elbeuf had a hot start with three bullets in three races!

    Last night's arrival of Pauline Courtois, just off her podium at the Finnish WIM Series stage, was good for the CVSAE crew! But, despite this perfect morning, the CVSAE has the same number of points as APCC Voile Sportive.

    Total suspense at the top of the rankings! The SNPH from Le Havre just one small point behind the leading duo, and just two points ahead of the crew from CV Saint-Quentin.

    The Daily ”SAP" Statistic
    31 seconds. During Flight 8 Race 2 was particularly tight. The 6 boats arrived almost at the same time and only 31 seconds separated the winner, the APCC Voile Sportive de Nantes, the 6th, USAM Brest. For comparison, during the same Flight, in the other 2 races, the gaps between the 1st and the 2nd were 51 and 52 seconds!

    The Tactical Maneuver of the Day
    Flight 5, race 1. In regattas, it is often said that a good start is 50% of the job done.

    The crew of CV Saint Aubin Elbeuf was able to prove it in the first race of the day. At 50 seconds before the start, the positioning of the boats suggested that the line was favorable to the right. At 30 seconds from the start, the CVSAE luffs to slow down, and not to arrive too early on the line. This maneuver forces the boat of the CV Saint-Quentin to luff too to not be penalized (the leeward boat being a priority over the windward one).

    By a sort of "domino effect”, the crew of SR Brest is obliged to luff, too, and must wait for the boats to sink downwind. Priority, is therefore, the CVSAE that can afford to "trigger" its maneuver at the appropriate time. This is what the crew does 5 seconds before the start. They leave with more speed than the others and with two competitors in their backwind. A high-class departure!

    Day 3- Sunday
    The third and final day of competition started off with a postponement on another beautiful day, but no wind!

    Sitting ashore, here was an interview with regatta leaders- Edouard Champault (APCC Voile Sportive - Nantes):

    What was your feeling about yesterday's conditions?

    EC: Good races yesterday with still very good conditions. A little less wind than the first day, but the sun and no rain was great. It is very satisfying for us to be in the lead overall. The wind was there, too, so it was perfect!

    How do you approach the last day of racing today?

    EC: Today, it's much softer in the wind, so we'll see. Otherwise, no particular strategies.  The goal being to finish in front of as much as possible and look for the points!

    Like the previous two days, the sun showed brightly in the morning. But, the wind was again a “no show”- a complete “glass out” across the bay.

    However, by 12:15pm a light breeze blew into the Brest Bay and allowed the Race Committee to launch two more flights and a total of six races.

    In the light airs, the Nantais team from APCC Voile Sportive, led by Simon Moriceau and Pierre-Loïc Berthet, worked miracles and benefited from a poor performance by the crew of the CVSAE during Flight 11 (3rd place) to take the lead in the overall standings before the last race of the weekend.

    It was a happy coincidence that both boats were in the same race during the 12th and final flight, which obviously gave a superb show on the water!

    The Normans tried "to get" their rivals in the starting procedure (see "The Maneuver of the Day below), but the Nantes managed to get off the start, win the last race and first place overall!

    As a result of this regatta, APCC Voile Sportive Nantes and CV St Aubin-Eleuf have qualified for the SAILING Champions League Finale in in St. Moritz, Switzerland. In addition, SNPH (Le Havre) and the CVSQ (Saint-Quentin en Yvelines) have qualified for the second semifinal of the SAILING Champions League, scheduled from 3 to 6 August in St. Petersburg, Russia.  If these two teams finish 1st and 2nd, they also qualify to go sail the SCL Championship in St. Moritz, Switzerland!  “Vive La France”!

    The Tactical Maneuver of the Day
    Last Flight, Race 1. The most anticipated race of the weekend. One of the few battles between the two regatta leaders and, most importantly, making for a dramatic finish to the regatta!

    Sitting just two points back in second place, the Normans of the CVSAE knew they had to put one or two boats between them and their rivals- the Nantais of APCC Voile Sportive.

    Their goal was to “destroy” the start of their opponents. At 1:30 from the start, the CVSAE were “hunting” the APCC and made a 180 turn to put themselves in front of their bow. Cédric Château, the CVSAE helmsman, then managed to pass under his opponent, who then found himself in a delicate position, because the Normans then have the opportunity to “close the door” by putting their bow next to the stern of the RC boat. The APCC must wait until the Normans bear-off to start their race. But, just as Cédric Château turns to cut speed and cut-off APCC at the line, two other boats are battling in the immediate vicinity of the RC boat! He found himself obliged to pass under these boats. The APCC used that opportunity to slip through a mouse hole near the RC boat and to jump across the starting line at the gun and enjoyed a clear air start!  Luck?  Skill?  Perhaps.   At the first crossing between the two boats, it was the Nantes APCC team that had the advantage and who, in turn, "scored” a direct attack on their opponent, tacking on top of them with no escape! Real match-racing!

    Not surprisingly, the winning team included a French J/80 Champion sailor as its skipper- Simon Moriceau.  His team members for APCC Voile Sportive were Simon Bertheau, Paul Medinger, and Pierre-loic Berthet.   Watch the French J/80 Sailing League video highlights on Facebook here.   Follow the French J/80 Sailing League on Facebook here.   For more French J/80 Sailing League information
     

    Vic-Maui Race Underway
    J/122E JOYRIDE Amongst The Leaders!
    (Victoria, British Columbia, Canada)- The Victoria to Maui International Yacht Race, hosted by the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club and the Lahaina Yacht Club, got underway July 1st. The 2,308nm course goes from Victoria, British Columbia to Maui, Hawaii.

    The lone J/Crew sailing the race is the gorgeous J/122E JOYRIDE from Seattle, WA skippered by her owner- John Murkowski. They are one of the most successful offshore racing teams in the Pacific Northwest.

    Day 1- The Start
    And they’re off! At 10:00 am Pacific Time, the 2018 Vic-Maui fleet sailed through the start line outside Victoria Harbour, tacking into a stiff, building westerly breeze.

    In the days leading up to the start, the sun broke out just in time for the fleet Send-off Party that rocked the Wharf Street docks on June 29. Transient orcas (killer whales) patrolled the entrance to Victoria’s Harbour on a damp June 30.

    Today, July 1st (Canada Day) dawned sunny, breezy, and warm (if not exactly tropical).  The Race Committee vessel hung on a tenuous anchor off Brotchie Ledge, while the spectator boat fleet circled and a drone flew overhead.  The VIP spectator boat Midnight Sun elegantly patrolled the spectator boat zone.  

    After the start, the J/122E JOY RIDE pressed hard going west into the Straits of Juan de Fuca.

    Eight hours into the race, the fleet was working its way towards the big left turn at Cape Flattery, and the open Pacific Ocean, where the adventure truly begins.  Weather systems including the North Pacific High, and a developing Low pressure trough, lie ahead in wait.

    Day 2- Past Cape Flattery and Onto the Rhumb Line
    After a great run down Strait of Juan de Fuca, most of the fleet rounded Cape Flattery before the sun set and got to see a sight that most people never get to. Cape Flattery is the very northwest corner of the lower 48 states and a major landmark. But, it is very remote by land and very few sailors venture out into the open Pacific.

    After rounding Cape Flattery, the fleet starts sailing down the rhumb line, more or less, depending on breeze strength and direction around the notoriously wobbly Pacific High. Roll Call happens at 1200 hrs Hawaiian Time (1500 hrs Pacific Time). Today the fleet is relatively close together about 160 miles offshore of Ocean Park, Washington on Willapa Bay.

    The weather pattern is setting up for boats to ride a path between the Pacific High hovering to the northwest of its usual location, and a Low pressure zone along the Washington Coast that caused the cool weather and rain before the start. If this weather pattern holds, it may result in a short, sweet, fast ride to Hawaii. But, the only thing constant about weather is change and the sailors will need to put the beautiful sight of Cape Flattery behind them and focus on figuring out what their weather crystal ball is telling them.

    The match race between the two leading boats in Racing 1 is a tight one. Firefly and the J/122E JOY RIDE are taking turns with the lead. At roll call, it was Firefly with a 10nm lead. But, leads are fleeting, and it remains to be determined which has the right weather track.

    Day 2- Weather strategy update
    Here is a quick primer on weather systems in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, between Cape Flattery and Hawaii (courtesy of David Sutcliffe).

    1) The dominant summer pattern in the Northeast Pacific Ocean is usually the North Pacific High.  Winds blow in a clockwise rotation around the High that is usually centered somewhere North of Hawaii and West of the US West Coast, say about 40N – 150W.  The High usually spreads over a very large area of the ocean and wobbles around, expanding and contracting, usually without the center moving too far.  Sunny and warm!

    2) Temperate zone low pressure weather systems travel from West to East in the temperate zone which technically is between about 23 degrees and 66 degrees North latitude.  Put another way, this zone is roughly between the Southern tip of Baja Mexico and the Bering Strait off Alaska.  In summer, the lows usually travel in the higher or more Northern areas of this zone, and are usually deflected above the High.  Winds blow in a counter clockwise direction around the lows.  Cloudy and rainy!

    3) In summer, the High usually deflects Low pressure systems up into the Gulf of Alaska, keeping nice summer conditions over the West Coast of North America.  When a high and a low system press against each other, there is usually a squeeze zone with stronger winds between the two systems.  Breezy and lumpy!

    4) Trade winds usually blow from the Northeast or East between about 30 degrees and 5 degrees North latitude.  This band is roughly between the USA-Mexico border and just North of the Equator.  Trade winds usually blow steadily, but El Nino and La Nina cycles affect them, and there will usually be some squalls.  The bottom of the High and the North edge of the trade winds blend together over the ocean.  Champagne sailing!

    5) Tropical Low pressure systems usually develop off the coast of Central America, and some strengthen to tropical storm or hurricane strength.  As with other lows, the wind blows counter clockwise around these lows.  These systems usually move Northwest to the open ocean area West of Baja Mexico before weakening and dissipating far from land.  Sometimes, they curve North and East to make landfall in Mexico, and occasionally they travel West towards or all the way to Hawaii.  Pay attention!

    So it’s all very simple, or maybe not!  A dozen mentions of "usually".  Now, imagine being the navigator onboard an ocean racing boat, sleep-deprived, peering at a laptop screen below-deck at “oh-dark-hundred” (0200 hrs local time) while the boat rolls, pitches and heaves.  Your information is limited to weather forecasts and observations that can be obtained over a very low-bandwidth and sometimes expensive communications link using either marine radio or satellite systems.  Nothing is certain, and reality often doesn’t look like the textbook said it would.  The rest of the crew each have their own opinions (of course!), and then there are the armchair quarterbacks back home on dry land, cozy, warm and dry, sipping their coffees.  Which way to go?  What to worry about?  How best to get to Hawaii safely and fast? One eye to weather!

    Day 3- Weather update
    Ocean weather, never a dry topic, is getting more interesting - we have a High, we have a Low, which way to go, don’t you know?   "Green eggs and ham, Sam I am" (Dr Seuss, of course).

    The North Pacific High is established and centered at about 43N 155W. It’s strong – about 1036mb – which is good, and about 600-800nm in diameter. There is a Low developing about 500nm West of Vancouver Island.  A squeeze zone should develop between the High and the Low.  Interesting!

    Tue Jul 3, 0800PDT
    The High is forecast to drift West while the Low is forecast to move SE and should be affecting the fleet from about Tuesday evening (tonight) through to Thursday morning.  Most boats should see sustained wind speeds in the 15-25 knot range, while some may see up to 30 knots, bordering on gale force.  Wind angles will change as the Low crosses the track, leading to a flurry of sail changes, and once settled the angles should be behind the beam and very favorable for fast sailing. Hopefully, fast!

    The fleet is currently sailing very close to the rhumb line, the shortest route to Hawaii.  Shortest, but not necessarily the fastest.  The High is likely to move farther West than usual, and combined with the Low it will be very attractive for the fleet to sail West of the rhumb line. Might be a risky move!

    Wed Jul 4, 1600PDT
    This is not the textbook route to Hawaii!  The risk of being West of the rhumb line is getting swallowed up into the middle of the High if/when it comes back to its usual position.  There is little to no wind in the middle of a High.  On the other hand, trying to go East of the rhumbline means beating into the Low and possible light and variable winds when it dissipates.  So, the navigators will be thinking this routing decision out carefully.  And, there is always the possibility, or probability, that the actual weather will be different from the expected weather.  A conservative strategy might be to sail on the favorable side of the Low, stay as close to the rhumb line as practical, sail less distance, stay in the squeeze breeze, and take less risk of getting becalmed.  Sounds easy!

    Beyond the next few days and the passage of the Low, the trade winds ahead are looking good.  Off to the southeast, there is some tropical system activity to keep an eye on, with TS Emilia reportedly dissipated and TS/Hurricane Fabio strengthening and forecast to dissipate before affecting the Vic-Maui fleet’s probable track to Hawaii.    

    Day 3- Who Stole the Wind?
    After a day and half of blast reaching in conditions best described as “not martini weather”, the fleet has hit the wall. A Low pressure zone (described above) moved over the fleet, substantially altering the weather and putting the brakes on the wind and boat speed.

    The relief from turbulent seas and stress on the boat is welcome. One boat reports that everyone is eating again and, for a lucky few, the daily constitutional has resumed. But, having to fight their way through a region of relative calm is not.

    At Roll Call, the boats are generally about 270 miles west of Tillamook, Oregon.  The leaders in Racing 1 have slowed from 8 kts to 5 kts and the boats in Racing 2 who are 40 miles behind have put the brakes on slowing to less than 2 kts. Ouch!

    In Racing 1, Murkowski's J/122E JOY RIDE sits in second just 16nm back. The boats in Racing 2 are essentially in a dead-heat with all within a few miles of each other.

    The next trick will be who is best positioned to get the wind first as the Low pressure system moves toward the east and the prospect of wind filling in behind it. Will that be Firefly who are positioned a bit to the east, or will it be JOY RIDE and the other Division 2 boats positioned well to the west of the rhumb line. And for the armchair sailors taking bets, it would be wise to consider that multiple winning navigator Brad Baker is calling the weather shots on Firefly.

    The over-arching concern is what happens next with the experienced veterans knowing that the fastest route to Maui is not usually the straight line.

    Oh and did we mention Hurricane Fabio? Fabio (who makes up these names?) is churning away well south of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico and is forecast to dissipate well before the fleet arrives. But, big Low pressure systems coming from the south usually disrupt the trade winds.

    Whatever happens, the navigators and weather dudes aboard the boats are going to earn their keep this year.

    Day 4- Three Big Things to Think About
    This is not a textbook year!  The weather situation for this Vic-Maui is developing into a true ocean racer’s challenge, where seemingly small decisions and a few miles one way or the other early in the race could make for big gains and losses.  That doesn’t mean it’s all on the navigators, who do have their work seriously cut out for them, as it’s also on the whole team who will have to sail the boat very well and work hard with sail changes, trim and transitions to get ahead or stay ahead. Here are three scenarios:

    1. Wednesday & Thursday
    The near term weather is all about getting past the Low that is currently (0900 PDT) centered about 42N 133W.
    - All of the boats appear to be going over the Low, varying distances West of the rhumb line.
    - There is a squeeze zone with strong winds, possibly to gale force, predicted.  Careful!
    - Leaders Firefly and JOY RIDE appear to be splitting this morning, with Firefly making a move further West and JOY RIDE staying the course.  With over twenty miles of lateral separation, and the passage of the Low to be threaded, the risk/reward is likely to be significant for both boats.  If one does a better job of passing the Low, they could stretch that into a very significant lead for the next stage of the race.
    - The Low may drift North, back across the fleet’s track, potentially catching the tail-runners in lighter, variable winds.  Sailing fast, now, is especially important for these boats.

    2. Thursday & Friday
    After navigating the Low, the teams will move on to sailing around the High and setting up for crossing the ridge which typically extends to the SE from the center of the High.  The models show a significant “plateau” developing on that ridge, and winds would typically be much lighter in such a feature.  Once again, teams will have to evaluate the risk/return on miles sailed vs. wind speed/angle, and decide where to go to avoid the plateau and to stay in good breeze.  Having parked on a similar plateau (making just 65 miles in 24 hours) in 2006, and had boats pass us on both sides (ouch!), I am going to watch this potential trap with great interest.

    3. Saturday
    The fleet should still be sailing around the High that should be centered about 40N 165W.  It is predicted to continue to be strong at about 1036mb.  One strategy could be to sail an isobar contour line around the high, say at about 1026-1028mb, to stay away from the center, sail in good pressure, and be closer to the rhumb line.  All the while not getting stuck on any “flat” spots.  Lead boats should be looking ahead to curve around the bottom right hand shoulder of the high and set up for calling the port gybe lay line to Maui.  Calling a layline from 800 to 1,000nm out!

    Beyond the One-Two-Three scenarios above, the trade winds ahead are looking good.  Champagne sailing ahead!  Off to the Southeast, there is some tropical system activity to keep an eye on, with TS Emilia reportedly dissipated and TS/Hurricane Fabio forecast to peak and then dissipate without significantly affecting the Vic-Maui fleet’s probable track to Hawaii.   

    Going out on the proverbial limb, I would say the first finishers could arrive in Maui on July 12 or 13.  Or not.  Time will tell. More news to come!    Follow the Vic-Maui Race here on Facebook.  Watch “live” real-time tracker of the fleet here- https://www.vicmaui.org/tracker   For more Vic-Maui Offshore Race sailing information
     

    VINEYARD VINES Wins NYYC One-Design Regatta
    (Newport, RI)- Thirty-sevens J/70s sailed in the second annual New York YC One-Design Regatta.  The fleet was comprised of numerous one-design class National, North American, and World Champions, most of whom are sailing the regatta as part of their training programs leading up to the WEST MARINE J/70 World Championship, hosted by Eastern YC in Marblehead, MA later in September 2018.

    A bad start in light air in a 37-boat fleet can be fatal. If you let it be. Skipper John Baxter and his team on the J/70 Team VINEYARD VINES were determined not to let a mistake at the outset of the first race define their regatta. So instead, they got to work, found the advantageous puffs and shifts, and battled through a fleet of top amateur and professional sailors to an 11th in the only race on the first day of the second annual New York Yacht Club One-Design Regatta, which was sailed Saturday and Sunday out of the New York Yacht Club Harbour Court in Newport, R.I. It wasn't anything to write home about, but it was enough to keep them in the hunt.

    On the finale on Sunday, in virtually identical conditions, Baxter and his team (wife Molly, Jake LaDow and Ben Lamb), were nearly unbeatable, winning two races and placing third in the final race to secure a seven-point win in the regatta's biggest class.

    "Yesterday we didn’t start very well; we were real deep and then we ground back to an OK finish," said John Baxter, from Riverside, N.Y. "Today, we started better and were able to use our speed to get out of some sticky situations. The goal was really to minimize the bad starts, because a lot of the teams go the same speed. You’ve got to have a front-row start and just go fast."

    Second was World Champion Tim Healy on USA 2 with a 1-9-3-10 tally for 23 pts.  Third was Ryan McKillen’s SURGE (with Mark Mendelblatt as main/ tactician) with a 5-6-11-1 for 23 pts, losing the tiebreaker.  Fourth was John Brim’s RIMETTE (with Taylor Canfield as main/ tactician) with a score of 3-2-4-20 fort 20 pts.  Fifth was the top Japanese team- Eichiro Hamazaki’s THE SLED with a tally of 2-5-5-18 for 30 pts.  For more New York YC One-Design Regatta sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
    * Hans Mulder, the Dutch owner of the J/105 WINDSHEAR, recently sailed a 35nm doublehanded race in L’Escala Spain.  Here is the report from Hans and the Club Nautic L’Escala.

    “The J/105 WINDSHEAR from Club de Vela Golfus is the winner of the IX Commodore’s Cup- Jotun Grand Prix, that brought together a total of 20 doublehanded racers to the starting line. The long distance regatta began at 1105 hrs and was the second sporting event in the calendar of activities that the Club Nàutic L'Escala has prepared to celebrate its 50th anniversary.

    The Dutchman sailing the J/105 WINDSHEAR- Hans Peter Mulder- took the absolute class and overall victory after being one of the few boats that managed to finish the race in the established time. The northeast wind, between four and eight knots at the start, began to diminish when the fleet began to reach Messina Island.  As a result, many boats did not finish within the time limit for the race.

    WINDSHEAR was also the first boat to arrive at 22:37:36 hours after racing for a total of 11 hours, 32 minutes and 36 seconds to complete the 35.5nm course. With departure from L'Escala, the route made the fleet navigate to a virtual buoy, the Medes Islands, and the island of Messina before returning to the starting point.”

    * How Youth Sailing Programs are Failing, and Ways to Fix Them.
    There is no doubt that competitive pressure on kids is resulting in the decline of sailing in some youth sailing programs.  However, this trend can be reversed.

    Twenty years ago, our club established a sailing camp.  In the early years, we had about ten kids, but sixteen years later, we hit a peak of 92 with ten on the waiting list.  This was about 10% of all the school-aged children in town.

    We supplement our racing program with a set of skill-building games.

    By far the most popular game is “pirates”.  The kids are divided into teams of five - a merchant captain, two coastguardsmen, and two pirates.  The activity is so popular that we tell the kids they cannot play it until they sail expertly, which usually happens about the middle of the summer.

    The second most-liked game is “sailing Frisbee”.  It uses a start/finish line, a race course and Frisbee or aerobie for each team.  A boat cannot tack while in possession of her Frisbee.  The Frisbee must go around the course, no shortcuts!

    Next is “sail-ball”, a field/team sport for sailors, like football, lacrosse, soccer, etc.  There are two goals and two teams.   Like soccer, play is continuous, with teams throwing the ball to each other to get it in the goal (usually a floating water polo net).  Within the three-boat length circle around the goal, defense has the right of way, otherwise racing rules apply.

    “Cheaters race” is always a winner on light days.  Setup a small race course- about 100 yards.  Ooching, pumping, skulling, etc., are all allowed.  Even swimming!

    We invented more than fifty games and add more each year.  Most games are fun, competitive, but low pressure.

    In addition to having a good time all summer, some youngsters become local regatta champions.

    So take heart, there are ways to get kids passionate about our sport.  And, ours is not the only approach.”

    Videos of some games can be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/user/JayEveleth.  And for written rules, visit http://kittihawk20.squarespace.com.  Thanks for this wonderful contribution from Jay Eveleth and Scuttlebutt USA


    * Katie Langolf led the effort to assemble an all Mother-Daughter Crew for the Cleveland Race Week Women's Regatta aboard the J/34 IOR KNEE DEEP.

    Four Moms, five daughters (ages 8-13), and their coach raced an offshore course with plenty of laughs and maybe a glass of wine after!

    Cheers Ladies!
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  • J/Newsletter- June 27th, 2018 J/121 APOLLO - Bermuda Race Winner Report
    How the West Was Won, Point @ Bermuda!
    (Hamilton, Bermuda)- Don Nicholson’s new J/121 APOLLO sailed its first major ocean race last week, the famous 635nm Newport to Bermuda Race.  Blessed with good fortune, solid navigation and well-executed strategy, they managed to win their Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division class and finish 6th overall.  An amazing performance considering the magnitude of variables and weather decisions necessary to stand atop the podium in the professional GHL Division.

    From onboard APOLLO, we get the report from Kerry Klingler, the J/Boats Team Leader at Quantum Sails, on how they managed to get their first big offshore win.

    “Great team, great boat, great sails combined for a super finish.  When racing programs emerge, it is rare that the individual elements align in a way that makes the whole program perform at a high level.  In this year’s Bermuda race, the APOLLO team realized this rare alignment.

    The program started with Don Nicholson searching for a new boat for his racing program with the help of team organizer Denise Bienvenu and Annapolis yacht broker David Malkin. They narrowed their focused to the new J/121, liking the idea of a water-ballasted performance boat, with well laid-out sail handling features that could be distance-raced and be very competitive.

    At that point, I became part of the program for Quantum Sails.  I looked at the proposed sail inventory set by J/Boats and made smart adjustments to suit our racing needs better.

    The first adjustment was a twin-groove headstay, with full hoist sails that were battened.  It was my feeling that we needed a full complement of jibs, with a J1, J2, J3 set on the forestay, and a J4 set on the inner forestay.  These jibs were all designed with horizontal battens for maximum efficiency.  With twin grooves, we could change headsails and keep the boat moving at top performance.

    For the spinnaker inventory, we sought to make the most out of the boat’s inherent performance capabilities.  With that in mind, we made the A2 larger than the proposed one-design size and added an A3.5 asymmetrical.  This sail was an in-between step, between the A2 and the Code 0.  It would double as heavy air runner, but would also be able to reach well.  Overall, the goal was to have a complete racing inventory, without having too many sails on board.

    We entered the boat in the GHL pro division to be able to make the most out of Al Johnstone’s water-ballasted design.

    In the last day and a half, the design made a huge difference in boat speed.  We were power-reaching at 8 to 10 knots. When racing J/122’s, we had never been able to hit that kind of speed.  Also, for most of the race, we had only four people on deck; the ballast made up the difference.

    In addition, the inner forestay for the J4 Jib worked great.  We were able to slot the J4 under the Code 0 and add considerable additional speed to the boat.  For distance racing, this set up makes a lot of sense.

    A lot of work goes into putting together a great well-meshed crew for a distance race like Newport to Bermuda.  Here are some of the keys to our success:

    First, you have to handle the boat well, so the bow and sail handlers come into play.

    Second, ideal trim is needed to keep the boat fast at all times. Everyone has to be vigilant, so that you’re trimmed fast all the time.

    Third, you need good helms, people who can push the boat to its fullest potential.  The APOLLO team had that fine mesh of talent to make the most of the boat’s capabilities and the race’s challenges.  We formed two efficient watches that married the best of the talent.  The first watch consisted of Don Nicholson, Kerry Klingler, Mike Levy, and David Malkin.  The second watch consisted of Denise Bienvenu, Paul White, William Pritz, and Jack McGuire.

    Fourth, you gotta have a good navigator that knows the weather, GRIB files, and routing software like Expedition.  To fill the role of navigator, we had Scott Adler.

    Fifth, any distance race requires sound tactical & strategic decisions.  Most top programs knew the target for entering and exiting the Gulf Stream. The difference was what happened south of the stream.  For us, the idea was simple: keep the boat moving as fast as possible towards Bermuda.  Given how surprisingly big the wind shifts were, keeping the boat moving towards the goal was the best solution.  I remembered sailing with John Kolius.  He always sailed the boat as fast as possible, never put the boat hard on the wind, but speed was the key and let the wind do what it wants to do– there will always be future wind shifts!!  For the last two and a half days, that is exactly what we did.  We didn’t chase shifts or wind predictions, but sailed with what we had.  We pointed the boat as close as possible headed towards Bermuda; in other words, we took the closest tack or gybe to the mark!

    In the end, the two watches did a great job.  Within the groups, we switched roles, having different people steering and trimming, who kept the crew fresh, and kept the boat moving.  The bond created working with such a fine group of sailors made the trip and the experience unforgettable.  It reminds me of why we do this unique and great sport!”  Thanks again for this contribution from APOLLO team member- Kerry Klingler.  For more J/121 Offshore speedster sailing information
     


    NYYC One-Design Regatta Preview
    (Newport, RI)- Thirty-five J/70s will be plying the waters of Narragansett Bay this coming weekend in the annual New York YC One-Design Regatta.  The fleet is comprised of numerous one-design class National, North American, and World Champions, most of whom are sailing the regatta as part of their training programs leading up to the J/70 World Championship, hosted by Eastern YC in Marblehead, MA later in September 2018.

    The headline crews include such class leaders as Joel Ronning’s CATAPULT from Excelsior, MN; Jack Franco’s 3 BALL JT from Lakewood, TX; Glenn Darden’s HOSS from Fort Worth, TX; Martie Kullman’s HYDRA from St Petersburg, FL; Jenn & Ray Wulff’s JOINT CUSTODY from Annapolis, MD; Jim Cunningham’s LIFTED from San Francisco, CA; Peter Cunningham’s POWERPLAY from Cayman Islands; John Brim’s RIMETTE from Fishers Island, NY; Pam Rose’s ROSEBUD from Chicago, IL; Bruno Pasquinelli’s STAMPEDE from Fort Worth, TX; John & Molly Baxter’s TEAM VINEYARD VINES from Riverside, CT; and Tim Healy’s famous USA 2 HELLEY HANSEN.

    There is a strong presence of Japanese teams, as they are conducting their three-regatta “Japanese National Championship” in order to qualify one of their teams for the J/70 Worlds in September.  For those in the TP52, Farr 40 and M32 world, you will recognize some of the leading crews.  Makoto Uematsu’s ESMERALDA from Tokyo hardly needs any introduction, he helped create the TP52 class with the support of Newport’s own Ken Read at North Sails.  In addition, there is the famous “SLED” team, composed of a number of boats- Hideyuki Miyagawa’s IT’S SLED from Hyogo; Takashi Okura’s SLED from Alpine, NJ; and Eichiro Hamazaki’s THE SLED from Kanagawa.  In addition, there is Yasutaka Funazawa’s NATSUKO from Tottori.  That should be an interesting competition to watch!  For more New York YC One-Design Regatta sailing information
     

    SAIL NEWPORT Regatta Update
    (Newport, RI)- Register for the best multi-class regatta of the season. Invited classes include J/24s and J/70s.

    Our motto: "Fast Racing, Cold Beer" will continue in 2018, as it has for the past three decades!

    Shoreside after-race socials are planned for both Saturday and Sunday. On July 7th, you will be able to make your own at our famous “taco bar!”  Enjoy Heineken and Mt. Gay and Whispering Angel wine and live music. Sunday's awards party will include food, drinks, and prizes.

    Regatta Manager Matt Duggan and Event Manager Emily Greagori have announced the first annual Sail Newport Corn Hole Championship (SNCHC) on Saturday, July 7 at the tent. Start training now.

    All parties will be at the new building this year!!  Come on down ad check it out!  Not too late to hop aboard and enjoy a fun weekend of sailing off Newport!  Register here and learn more about THE Newport Regatta at SAIL Newport
     

    J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    It almost seemed like the end of June was cause for celebration for the ubiquitous concept of “race weeks”!  They were going on everywhere in the Americas, East, West, and in the Middle!  For starters, there was the fun-loving Block Island Race Week sailed on that pretty island off of Rhode Island- the J/111s seemed to have a blast in that event.  Then, in the Midwest, there was Cleveland Race Week held off Cleveland, Ohio on Lake Erie; and again J/111s had a wonderful time, so did a fleet of J/22s, J/70s, and J/105s. Out on the Left Coast, there were two events at opposite ends of the Pacific coast.  One was the popular J/FEST Northwest Regatta- hosted by Corinthian YC of Seattle on Puget Sound for one-design fleets of J/24s, J/97E’s, J/105s, J/109s, J/80s, and a PHRF fleet.  Then, in decidedly warmer climates (but with lots of “June Gloom”), was the Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week, hosted by Long Beach YC for one-design fleets of J/70s and J/120s and a PHRF fleet.  So much for all those race weeks/ weekends!

    In addition to those activities in the Pacific Northwest, the Race to Alaska finished on Monday for the top six boats, including the J/88 BLUE FLASH.  Read the conclusion to their epic 750nm adventure up the “inside passage” from Seattle, WA to Ketchikan, Alaska- it's amazing their average age was 19.8 yrs old, including a recent high-school graduate that made the trek north!

    Going further on the long-distance race theme, the South Shore YC hosted their annual “pilgrimage” across Lake Michigan, a.k.a. the famous “Queen’s Cup Race” for big boats.  A big fleet assembled south of Milwaukee, WI at SSYC for their pre-race beer, brats, hotdogs, burgers- the smell and tastes were unbelievably good- after all, transplanted Germans in Milwaukee know how to cook that stuff good!  The 65nm race across was nothing to write home about, a pretty light air affair.

    Speaking of the light air theme, that is what defined the RORC’s Morgan Cup Race last weekend for a flock of J’s doing their best to make forward progress both along the shore and offshore without kedging!

    Finally, across the European continent and down to that little jewel in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea- Sardinia!  As they are known to do so incredibly well, the YC Costa Smeralda rolled out the red carpet for the AUDI Invitational Team Racing Challenge. It is a 2x2 team race on J/70 one-design sailboats, sailed off Porto Cervo in their gorgeous aquamarine waters- rough life for those seven participating teams from Sweden (1), United Kingdom (2), USA (3), and Italy (1).

    Read on! The J/Community and Cruising section below has many entertaining stories and news about J/Sailors as well as cruising blogs about those who continue to enjoy the Caribbean and the South Pacific, staying warm while others are trying to stay warm up north.  Check them out!  More importantly, if you have more J/Regatta News, please email it or  upload onto our J/Boats Facebook pag  Below are the summaries.

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Jun 28- Jul 1- Norwegian J/70 National Championship- Hanko, Norway
    Jun 29- Jul 1- New York YC One-Design Regatta- Newport, RI
    Jun 30- Vic-Maui International Yacht Race- Victoria, BC, Canada
    Jul 7-14- J/80 World Championship- Les Sables d’Olonne, France
    Jul 7- Round the Island Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    Jul 7-8- Sail Newport Regatta- Newport, RI
    Jul 12-15- Italian J/70 Cup- Malcesine, Italy
    Jul 12-14- Canadian J/70 National Championship- Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
    Jul 12-20- Offshore Sailing Worlds- The Hague, The Netherlands
    Jul 12-15- Vineyard Cup- Vineyard Haven, Martha’s Vineyard, MA
    Jul 13- Lake Ontario 300 Challenge Race- Port Credit, ONT, Canada
    Jul 13- RORC Cowes-Dinard-St Malo Race- St Malo, France
    Jul 14- Belles Beer Bayview Mackinac Race- Port Huron, MI
    Jul 16-21- New York YC Race Week- Newport, RI
    Jul 19-20- Edgartown Race Week- Edgartown, Martha’s Vineyard, MA
    Jul 19-22- Whidbey Island Race Week- Whidbey Island, WA
    Jul 20-29- Travemunde Race Week- Travemunde, Germany
    Jul 21- Chicago to Mackinac Race- Chicago, IL
    Jul 21- Edgartown Round Island Race- Edgartown, Martha’s Vineyard, MA
    Jul 21-22- Fiesta Cup- Santa Barbara, CA
    Jul 23-28- J/24 European Championship- Glucksburg, Germany
    Jul 26-29- Marblehead NOOD Regatta- Marblehead, MA
    Jul 26-29- J/105 North American Championship- Harbor Springs, MI
    Jul 26-29- J/35 North American Championship- Cheboygan, MI
    Jul 27-29- J/88 Great Lakes Championship- Youngstown, NY
    Jul 27- New England Solo-Twin- Newport, RI
    Jul 27- Santa Barbara to King Harbor Race- Santa Barbara, CA
    Jul 27-29- Ugotta Regatta- Harbor Springs, MI
    Jul 28-29- CanAm Regatta- Youngstown, NY
    Jul 28- RORC Channel Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

    Fun J/FEST Northwest Regatta
    (Seattle, WA)- Hosted by Corinthian YC Seattle and J/Boats Northwest, the 2018 edition of J/FEST Northwest was a great success for the forty-seven teams that participated in the two-day regatta.  Racing took place for a PHRF class and one-design for J/24s, J/80s, J/97E’s, J/105s, and J/109s. There was no question the Saturday evening dinner and extravaganza took its toll on some of the crews, a number of them waking up a bit “foggy” on Sunday morning.  Most classes had at least three races, and others up to five in total.

    The eight-boat PHRF Division had an eclectic mix of J’s from across the design spectrum of time. In the end, it was twin J/30s leading the way!  Winning was Jim Bottles’ CELEBRATION with a 1-1-2 for 4 pts, followed by Cindy Gossett’s OUTLAW with a 2-2-1 for 5 pts.  Seems to have been a nip-and-tuck battle between them all weekend-long.  Third was Jamie Thomas & Kyle Caldwell’s J/44 ASYLUM.

    There was a surprising win in the eleven-boat J/24 class.  Taking the honors was Lydia Volberding’s JAILBREAK with a remarkably consistent 1-3-3-3-1 for 11 pts total.  The balance of the podium was determined by a tie-breaker on 18 pts each- taking second was Jacob Lichtenberg’s HAIR OF THE DOG with a 9-1-4-1-3 over Scott Milne’s TREMENDOUS SLOUCH with a 2-8-1-2-5.

    It was another very close battle for the top of the leaderboard in the eight-boat J/80 class.  In the end, it was a classic “last race/ last leg” that determined the ultimate outcome.  Taking the class win was Bryan Rhodes’ CRAZY IVAN with a 1-7-1-1-2 for 12 pts total.  Second was Emre Sezer’s RECKLESS with a consistent 2-4-2-2-3 for 13 pts.  Third was Phil Dean’s RUSH with a 6-3-3-3-1 for 16 pts.

    Rocky Smith’s INDIGO HORIZONTAL dominated the J/97E class with straight bullets.  Following in second was Scott McConnell’s ROCKET J SQUIRREL and third was Eric Barlow’s IRIE.

    The always-popular J/105 class of eleven teams saw a familiar face at the top of the podium- Chris Phoenix’s JADED winning with a 2-1-3-3-1 for 10 pts.  Grabbing the silver were the “Soupers” from Portland- Eric Hopper, Matt Davis, Doug Schenk’s FREE BOWL OF SOUP- posting a respectable 3-2-4-2-2 for 13 pts.  Third just one point back was Jerry Diercks’ DELIRIUM with a 5-3-2-1-3 for 14 pts.  Two locally famous names in the local PNW circuit rounded out the top five- Jim Geros’ LAST TANGO in 4th and Tom Kerr’s CORVO 105 in 5th.

    Winning the Pacific NW J/109 Championship Trophy was Stu Burnell’s TANTIVY with a complete blitzkrieg of the fleet, posting just five bullets for a massive total of only 5 pts. Ouch.  Jerry Woodfield’s SHADA nearly pulled off a win, but had to hang tough just to get the silver by a mere one point with a 4-4-2-2-2 tally for 14 pts.  Third was Tolga Cezik’s LODOS with a reasonably consistent record of 2-2-3-5-3 for 15 pts.  For more J/Fest Northwest Regatta sailing information
     

    J/Sailors Love Long Beach Race Week
    Campbell Tops 70s, CAPER Clobbers 120s
    (Long Beach, CA)- Sunny, southerly conditions were forecast for the Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week that took place from June 22nd to 24th last weekend. The popular annual regatta, hosted by Alamitos Bay Yacht Club (ABYC) and Long Beach Yacht Club (LBYC), featured three days of fair winds and friendship for all.

    Chuck Clay, long-time LBRW Regatta Co-chair and ABYC staff commodore, said, "I really enjoy the social side of the event and the camaraderie between the sailors. They travel from up and down the coast to compete, and are fierce on the race course! But, when they get ashore, it's all about having a good time and telling 'war stories' with old friends. Mix that in with a little rum from one of our sponsors (Mount Gay Rum) and you have a perfect recipe for great times, great stories and a few shenanigans!"  Indeed, all of that became true over the weekend!

    Over 130 boats sailed in the regatta, featuring a huge one-design fleet of J/70s with some of the world’s top competitors participating. In addition, the ever-popular J/120 fleet had their usual knock-out, drag-em-out-fight for supremacy offshore.

    Day 1- June Gloom
    Despite a gloomy morning and weather forecast, "Long Beach delivered!" said Co-chair Chuck Clay.  By the start of the first race, the marine layer (a.k.a. June Gloom Fog) had burnt off and the modest southerly flow began shifting right. Soaring inland temperatures drew in the ocean breeze, swiftly ratcheting to a 14-knot wind from 230-degrees.

    Day 2- June Gloom + Big Lump
    Was that Long Beach? Or, was that the laundromat?  Choppy, lumpy, 'washing machine' conditions on San Pedro Bay, with hearty 10 to 14 knot breezes, gave sailors a day to remember.  Again, seasonal 'June gloom' conditions dominated the sky, with steady breeze and sloppy seas, giving Random Leg (RL) racers a scenic and invigorating ride.

    Random leg racing has grown in popularity over recent years, according to regatta co-chair John Busch. "What's kept this regatta going strong is we offer both buoy and random leg racing. A lot of the old-timer boats don't necessarily want to do the buoy racing, but still want to come out and play."

    "We have four random-leg divisions, based on the size and age of the boats, and really fine tune the course for each group," said Busch, who is also PRO on Charlie course. The regatta ran races on three separate courses, each with its own expert Race Committee.

    Saturday's racing capped off with the legendary Mount Gay Rum party, with music and dancing around the pool at LBYC.

    Day 3- No more June Gloom! Classic Sunny LA Day!
    It all came together on the final day. The wind blew, the sun shone, dolphins leapt, and racers smiled.  On the last of three days of highly competitive racing, sailors got “the whole enchilada.”

    A gentle breeze from the south filled in, bringing with it a mild sea state– nothing like Saturday's churning grey waters. Marine life came out to play, and sunny skies warmed the sailors. And, from the standpoint of the sport of sailing, the heat was on!

    As title sponsor, Bruce Cooper (Ullman Sails Newport Beach) spent several years driving the media boat, visiting the three courses each day, and checking on clients and friends along the way. When he became active in the J/70 fleet though, he added another hat – joining the fray as competitor.

    "Moving from a sponsor-spectator, to competitor, I'm definitely burning the candle at both ends– racing during the day (on his J/70 USA 32) and handling sail repairs at night! But, it is worth it. It's like Christmas morning, when you know you're going to get to do race week. Whether there's a lot of wind, or not, it's always some of the best racing you'll have all year."

    There was no question the J/70 class saw some fearsome, close racing around the race track all weekend long.  After seven races, the surprise winner was a guy named Argyle Campbell from Newport Harbor YC sailing SOX.  Well, not so much of surprise when you realize who his team included- a fellow Etchells 22 World Champion- Bill Hardesty on main/ tactics and also J/22 World Champion- Allen Terhune on trim. Not exactly your crew of happy weekend warriors! In fact, more like a bunch of bloodthirsty mercenaries!

    Despite that kind of intellectual, tactical firepower on board the mighty SOX, Bruce Golison’s team on MIDLIFE CRISIS (a pretty laid-back crew by comparison) nearly pulled off the overall win!  Both teams know the SoCal weather conditions like it’s their backyard, having grown up in the LA area for decades.  Golison’s crew threw down the gauntlet in the first race with a bullet, but then suffered in races 3 to 5.  However, they got their “mojo” going to close with two bullets while Campbell’s crew were suffering a bit of brain fade (or, speed)- remarkable, considering it was Hardesty and Terhune.  In the end, great competition amongst SoCal sailing legends.  Taking third was Jeff Janov’s MINOR THREAT from California YC, fourth was Ignacio Perez’s ZAGUERO from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, and fifth place went to the Corinthians Division winner- Pat Toole’s 3 BIG DOGS from Santa Barbara YC.  Second in Corinthians was Chris Raab’s SUGOI and third was Tony Collins’ FLY.

    In the J/120 class, it was John Laun’s CAPER that took class honors with five 1sts in seven races for a total of 12 pts!  Second was Chuck Nichols’ CC RIDER with 16 pts and third was John Snook’s JIM with 22 pts.

    In the PHRF handicap world, Doug & Jack Jorgensen’s J/111 PICOSA took 2nd place in PHRF B class, narrowly missing the overall win by just one point. Their team was winning going into the last race, averaging just over a 2nd, but a last race miscalculation saw them score a 5th to the winner’s 2nd to lose the event. They were sailing in a very high-powered fleet that included three 1D35s, three M32s, and Farr 30, all high-performance light-medium air boats that do not like any heavy weather!

    Then, in PHRF RL-D class, Jack Mayer’s J/109 ZEPHYR took third. In PHRF RL-C class, Paul Stemler’s J/44 PATRIOT was 5th and Tim Harmon’s J/124 CIRRUS was 6th.

    In PHRF D Racing, with seven buoy races to the count, David Boatner’s J/35 RIVAL crushed the competition with four 1sts and three 3rds for 13 pts total.  Second was Heinz Butner’s J/109 RAPTOR with 21 pts.  And, fourth was Scott McDaniel’s J/105 OFF THE PORCH with 30 pts.  For more Long Beach Race Week sailing information
     

    Light Air Queen’s Cup Race
    J/145 MAIN STREET Tops Class, J/110 Eclipses Doublehanders
    (Milwaukee, WI)- The 80th running of the Queen’s Cup, one of the most storied yacht races on the Great Lakes hosted by the South Shore Yacht Club will certainly not go down as one of the fastest in history.  When TP52s take an average of 7.5 kts to cross a distance of 68.5nm from Milwaukee, WI across Lake Michigan at a course of approximately 89 degrees to Grand Haven, MI, you know it was not going to be one of those famous Midwestern “barn burners”, for sure.

    Nearly 200 boats participated, with over 1,200 sailors enjoying great parties both pre-race and post-race at each venue.

    The Queen's Cup is one of the oldest cups in the yachting world yachting that is still offered for competition every year. Its history dates back to an age when both British Victorian silverwork and sailing yachts were without rival anywhere.

    American shipyards of this era were turning out very fast sailing vessels called “clipper ships”. These craft were extreme designs built to out-perform the fast new breed of ships powered by steam. The American racing sloop Silvia was built during this era using this radical new technology.

    On August 19, 1853, she won second place in a regatta scheduled by the Royal Yacht Squadron that was raced off Cowes, England.

    First prize- the 100 Guineas Cup - was won by the English yacht Gaily, six minutes and 38 seconds ahead of Silvie. This outstanding performance by the American Silvie led the RYS to award a special prize to her, the 50 Guineas Cup, now known as the Queen's Cup.  Notably, this took place exactly two years after the yacht America won the first 100 Guineas Cup in 1851!

    The cup was brought back to the New York Yacht Club, Silvia's home port, and went into obscurity until 1874, when a Mr. J.H. Godwin, of Kingsbridge, New York, gave the Cup to his friend Kirkland C. Barker, Commodore of the International Yacht Club of Detroit. The Cup was to be offered as an international challenge called the Godwin Cup.

    But, as it turned out there was only one challenge, Annie Cuthbert of Hamilton, Ontario. Barker's yacht Cora won the first race, with the Canadians winning the second, but forfeiting the final race. This gave Barker his victory, but left very strained relations between the Detroit and Hamilton yachtsmen. The Cup was never offered for competition again, probably due to the sudden death of Commodore Barker. He and two other crewmembers drowned while shifting ballast in Cora in preparation for the 1875 racing season.

    Nothing more is known about the Queen’s Cup until about the turn of the century, when a young lad, while cleaning out a family storeroom, discovered an exquisite rosewood box holding the Cup. The lad was Walter Hull, whose father was Charles Hull, son-in-law of Commodore Barker, to whom the Cup had been given.

    Walter Hull treasured the Cup for the rest of his life and kept it in his possession until September 1, 1938. At that time, his good friend William Lawrie (late Commodore of South Shore Yacht Club in 1944) persuaded him to deed it to South Shore Yacht Club, "for an annual race across Lake Michigan, always starting off South Shore Yacht Club, and ending at a point in Michigan, open to all yachts of a recognized yacht club on the Great Lakes."

    Of note, the silversmith firm of Robert Garrard, 29 Panton Street, St. Martins, England, created the Queen’s Cup in 1847-1848 (the official silversmith of the British Royalty).  Interesting history, how “son of America’s Cup” ended up at one of the most laid-back, unassuming sailing clubs on Planet Earth- and, at that, in the Great Lakes!

    Given that cool history behind the how the Queens’ Cup ended up in Milwaukee, here’s how it all went down for this year’s race.

    Winning PHRF 1 Class was Bill Schanen’s elegant, bright fire-engine red J/145 MAIN STREET, a fixture in big boat offshore events for over a decade on Lake Michigan. As usual, it was a “family affair” with many Schanen generations enjoying a benign cruise across the lake.

    J/Crews nearly swept PHRF 2 class. Taking second was Doug Petter’s J/130 WILLIE J, fourth was Bob Klairmont’s J/133 SIROCCO 3, fifth Jim Richter’s J/44 CHEEP-N-DEEP II, and sixth Bob McManus’ J/130 EDGE.

    PHRF 3 was the J/111 Division.  Winning that incredibly competitive class was Mark Caliban’s NO QUARTER, followed by Brad Faber’s UTAH in second and Richard Hobbs’ HOBGOBLIN holding on for the bronze.

    Hanging in for fourth place in the PHRF 4 class was Doug Evans’ J/109 TIME OUT.  Then, in PHRF 8 Class also taking fourth was Dennis Dryer’s J/30 FRANK LLLOYD STARBOARD.

    Sailing like a dynamic-duo possessed in the PHRF Shorthanded was Ron Otto’s J/110 TAKEDOWN 2, taking home the gold by a fairly decent margin!   For more Queen’s Cup Race sailing information
     

    Drift-a-thon RORC Morgan Cup Race
    (Cowes, Isle of Wight, England)- Although light winds were predicted for the race, the fleet experienced the remnants of a westerly sea breeze for the Squadron Line start, lasting long enough for a twilight exit from the Solent.

    Calms and complex local effects during the night, made observation and experience of light airs racing paramount. As night fell, the breeze dropped significantly, resulting in somewhat of a park-up off Portland Bill, giving an advantage to the higher rated IRC boats that had made the tidal gate. However, close to Midsummer the night was short, dawn broke before 0500hrs and the lower IRC rated yachts enjoyed longer daylight racing with enhanced breeze.

    In what amounted to a wildly variable and complex race, it appeared that hitting corners was working best.  However, while inshore boats that were way inshore faired better than those who were hedging their bets, it was the offshore boats that stood quite a ways offshore that ended up winning most divisions.  In short, the pre-race strategy Plan 1, devolved to scenario option C or D for most boats.  "C’est la vie, c’est la guerre".

    The net results were as follows for some of the J/Teams that were participating in a quasi-drifting match.  In IRC 1 Class, Nick Angel’s J/121 ROCK LOBSTER took 4th place. In IRC 2 Class Andy Theobald’s J/122 R&W was 4th and Gilles Fournier/ Corinne Migraine’s J/133 PINTIA 5th place (e.g. notable that one of the winningest teams offshore in RORC and French racing circles also had a tough race!).  Finally, in IRC 3 Class, Chris Preston’s J/109 JUBILEE was 4th and Rob Cotterill’s J/109 MOJO RISIN’ placed 5th.
    For more RORC Morgan Cup Race sailing information
     

    Newport Harbor YC Two-Peats 2x2 Team Race
    (Porto Cervo, Sardinia)- The AUDI Invitational Team Racing Challenge kicked-off on June 21st- the Summer Solstice- for four days of racing on the emerald green and blue waters off Porto Cervo. The Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, with the support of title sponsor AUDI, hosted the event.

    The biennial regatta took place aboard the YCCS fleet of J/70 one-design sailboats using the "team racing" formula in which a total of four boats race at one time- two boats representing each team with 3 crew on board.  The teams compete in a series of short, fast races that emphasize teamwork between the crews. Most importantly, in the 2x2 format, last loses!  Making for some incredibly dramatic attempts at “pass-backs” in the absolute latest stages of any race!

    Seven teams sailed the third edition of the event, including the Newport Harbor YC from California, winner of the 2016 edition. Also sailing were teams from Gamla Stans Yacht Sallskap from Sweden; Eastern Yacht Club, Newport Harbor YC, and the New York Yacht Club from the USA; and the United Kingdom’s Royal Yacht Squadron and Royal Thames YC. The YC Costa Smeralda Team Racing crew represented the home team.

    YCCS Commodore Riccardo Bonadeo commented on the inter-club event, "I am particularly pleased to welcome these teams who have travelled from countries as far away as Sweden, the United States and England to come to Porto Cervo for three days of thrilling racing. We are looking forward to seeing some great sportsmanship with crews competing to defend the honours of their respective Clubs. And finally, I would like to thank our home team flying the YCCS colors, led by Antonio Sodo Migliori and Edoardo Mancinelli Scotti."

    Day One- YCCS Takes Early Lead
    The first day was characterized by light wind. The host team from YCCS sat atop the fleet, followed by Newport Harbor Yacht Club and in third place, tied on points, were the two American teams- Eastern Yacht Club and New York Yacht Club.

    After an initial postponement of the first starting signal due to light winds, the Race Committee got racing started at approximately 13.30 on the regatta course in front of Porto Cervo Marina. The seven teams managed to complete the first round robin.

    Opening racing was the YCCS team, headed, respectively, by Antonio Sodo Migliori and Edoardo Mancinelli Scotti. They sailed fast and smart, claiming victory in all six of the races they sailed. The Americans dominated second and third place in the standings; with Newport Harbor YC (skippers Justin Law and Mac Mace) leading Eastern YC (skippers Spencer Powers and Stein Skaane) and New York YC (captained by Brian Doyle and Will Graves).

    Filippo Maria Molinari, Team Captain of YCCS, commented, "We've given all the participating teams a good welcome. We were able to win all our races today and we are, of course, pleased. There is a little more wind forecast for tomorrow. Today, we had very light conditions, 7-8 knots up to 10, but the day was very pleasant. Most likely, we are at an advantage because we have a light crew, we'll see what happens in the next few days with stronger wind."  A somewhat prophetic point of view from Sr. Molinari!

    Day Two- Newport Harbor YC Take Lead
    The second day of racing started as scheduled. Accompanied by a westerly wind of varying intensity, racing started as scheduled at 1130 hrs. At approximately 1500 hrs, as the breeze dropped out, racing was halted for an hour until the westerly wind built back up to 12-15 knots. This allowed the teams to complete the second round robin of the regatta with a total of 50 races run so far.

    With a perfect scorecard of 8 wins out of 8 races, the Newport Harbor YC team led by Justin Law and Mac Mace took control of the provisional classification.  The host team from YCCS (skippers Antonio Sodo Migliori and Edoardo Mancinelli Scotti) posted 6 wins out of a possible 8, now sat in second place. The New York YC team pulled away from Eastern YC by a delta of two points, and now sits in third place in the standings.

    Dave Clark, Commodore of Newport Harbor YC, who was participating as a crew member on their team, commented,  "The event has exceeded our expectations, the organization, the race committee, sponsors and all the staff have been perfect. We're having fun and we're also racing well!"

    Skipper Justin Law added, "It was a fantastic day, we started at 1130 hrs on the dot and apart from the drop in wind in the middle of the day, everything was perfect. We can't wait to race again tomorrow!"

    Day Three- NHYC Victorious, Again!
    The final day saw Newport Harbor YC clinch victory ahead of the YC Costa Smeralda (YCCS).

    After the morning briefing at 0900 hrs, the YCCS Race Committee went out on the water to assess whether conditions would permit the scheduled start for the day. After observing conditions of 1.5 meter waves and 18-25 knots of westerly wind, the YCCS PRO postponed sailing until the breeze settled around 1500 hrs. The finalists then proceeded with racing to decide the top podium finishers.

    Newport Harbor YC (Justin Law and Mac Mace) faced the home team from YCCS (Antonio Sodo Migliori and Edoardo Mancinelli Scotti) to do battle for first and second place. Winning two of their three races earned the Americans the championship. Eastern YC (Spencer Powers and Stein Skaane) then sailed against the New York YC (Brian Doyle and Will Graves) in a fight for third place, with NYYC taking the third on countback to their earlier round robin results.

    Justin Law, skipper of Newport Harbor YC, commented on his team's victory, "A fantastic day, the YC Costa Smeralda Race Committee did a great job, they were patient and waited for the wind to die down and made the regatta happen. A big THANK YOU goes to my team mates for making this victory possible!"

    All teams received the YCCS Burgee as a memento of the event and the winners from Newport Harbor Yacht Club were also awarded a Garmin inReach Explorer+ that can be used to send and receive text messages and e-mails in any part of the globe.  For more information on the YC Costa Smeralda 2x2 J/70 Team Race event, please contact - Marialisa Panu- Tel. +39 0789 902223/ email- pressoffice@yccs.it / website- http://www.yccs.com
     

    J/Crews Lead Cleveland Race Week
    J/111 SPACEMAN SPIFF Picket Fences PHRF B!
    (Cleveland, OH)- The ever-popular Cleveland Race Week started off the weekend before with one-design classes of J/22s, J/70s, and J/105s.  Subsequently, midweek was the Women’s and Doublehanded Races.  Then, it closed with PHRF handicap classes and more J/105 one-design class racing.

    Topping out PHRF B class was a legendary family crew that has supported sailing at every conceivable level one can imagine- from Opti’s to J/70s, to J/88s and J/111s, to anything else that floats!  Yes, in Cleveland that would be the Ruhlman family.  In what can only be described as a “family affair”, it was the Ruhlman family on their beloved J/111 SPACEMAN SPIFF that won class honors with straight bullets in six races!  On board were at least five (?) Ruhlman’s?  The team had at least the following crew members- Meagan Ruhlman-Cross, Michael Sheehan, Pat Sheehan, Rob Ruhlman, Abby Ruhlman, Tesse Ruhlman and Ryan Ruhlman.

    The balance of the podium in PHRF B was Chris Mallet’s J/109 SYNCHRONICITY in 2nd, followed by another J/111- Don Hudak’s CAPERS.

    Paul Matthew’s J/35 WHITEHAWK sailed fast and managed silver in PHRF C class, followed by Kevin Young’s J/39 BLACK SEAL in third place.

    PHRF D was the battle of the pretty J/34 IOR boats.  Winning that shootout was Dave Krotseng’s BONAFIDE with a 3rd in class, followed by the familiar Cleveland crew of KNEE DEEP (Brett & Katie Langolf) just two points back in 4th position.

    The fleet of seven J/105s enjoyed close racing over the weekend.  In fact, it was a strong performance on Bob Mock’s UNBRIDLED that kept them in the lead, winning two races and adding two deuces to take the class win.  Just two points in arrears was the Uhlir Brothers TRIO, the rounding out the podium with the bronze was Stephen Mitcham’s BREEZIN BAYOU.

    On Wednesday, it was Women’s PHRF Racing Day.  The two J/105s sailed fast and both took podium honors. Winning was Lucinda Einhouse’s crew on OVATION and hoisting the bronze medal was Angela Mazzolini’s SLINGSHOT.

    In addition, on the same day, it was Tim Vining’s J/22 DEUCE that won the Doublehanded JAM division (just jibs & mains).  For more Cleveland Race Week sailing information
     

    Fun-Loving Block Island Race Week
    (Block Island, RI)- The Duck Island Yacht Club in Westbrook, Connecticut and the Block Island Yacht Club teamed up to co-host Block Island Race Week 2018. The sailors were blessed with five good days of racing on Block Island Sound from June 17th to the 22nd.  In addition to random leg races, there was the famous Round Island Race, too.

    In the PHRF Spinnaker division, a half-dozen boats sailed he entire week.  The highlight was the three-way “match race” taking place within the PHRF division all week long, all vying for “class” bragging rights.  In the end, topping the J/111s was Sedge & Andy Ward’s BRAVO.  Greg Slamowitz’s MANITOU, then Kenn Fischburg’s WILD CHILD followed them in succession.

    In the PHRF Non-Spinnaker class, Peter Hilgendorff’s J/29 MEDDLER ended up taking fourth in class after not sailing the last two races.   Sailing results here  For more Block Island Race Week sailing information
     

    J/88 Race 2 Alaska Done!
    (Port Townsend, WA)- On Saturday, June 16th, the infamous Race to Alaska started off Port Townsend, WA for the first leg of 40nm.  Then, on Monday, June 18th, the “real race” took off to Ketchikan, Alaska for over 750nm up fearsome straits with currents up to 15 kts, tornado-puffs pealing down hillsides in 40 kt microbursts, and even midsummer snow off the Canadian maritime provinces of British Columbia and the “inside passage” north to Alaska.  The weather can be fearsome.  A race not for the faint of heart, that is for sure.

    When the 2015 Race to Alaska was first announced, the premise was so absurd it woke up sailors far and wide with a wake-up call. No engine or support along 750 miles.  What reasonable person would tackle that challenge? Sure, the $10,000 first prize literally nailed to a piece of wood got everyone’s attention.  But, there’s no free lunch in life, and the cost of that ten grand was high.

    Three years later, our over-wired, over-stressed, over-politicized planet remains in need of some pain and suffering to remind ourselves that, as John Maxwell notes, “You cannot overestimate the un-importance of practically everything.”

    The 2018 edition of the R2AK delivered. Here’s the June 25 report from Ketchikan, Alaska:

    Even for those who lack calloused fingertips and strained tendons commonly associated with “tracker finger,” just watching the dock in Ketchikan provides all the cues needed to predict the imminent arrival of another Race to Alaska team.

    Regardless of the time of day (usually late) or amount of rain (usually a lot), the procession down the docks starts with people, then the cameras and microphones of local press plus the R2AK media team, then a bell on a stand from the Ketchikan Yacht Club, a six-pack or two of congratulatory beer, and a uniformed customs officer.

    Sometimes, there’s also a guy playing bagpipes. Sometimes, someone brings a shotgun. To date, these two have remained peacefully unrelated.

    Fans crowd the docks, line the piers and breakwater, and wait for the first hoot from the first sighting to break the damn of pent-up enthusiasm and respect and what follows is a rolling wave of joyous elation that brings people together, lifting their voices, bagpipes, and the occasional shotgun blast to a heart-warming cacophony that serves as encouragement and an audible navigational aid for their final 500 feet.

    On Monday June 25th, that scene played out six times as the first echelon of finishers touched the dock, rang the bell, drank the beer, cleared customs, and had one reaction or another to the bagpipes.  First to finish at 12:17 AM with a champagne shower was Team Sail Like A Girl- it was a joyous celebration for the all-women crew of seven, first to ring the bell, and immediately announcing that all $10,000 nailed to the board would go to the women’s Breast Cancer research- kudos to them for a job well done!  

    Several hours later, J/88 Team BLUE FLASH hove into view, much to the delight of many on the crowded dock.  Scott Grealish’s son Sean and five other crewmembers, all under-25, sailed their J/88 BLUE FLASH into the Ketchikan finish line as the sixth boat overall around 1635 hours.  That they even finished was a reward in itself as the youngest adventurers ever to accomplish that feat.

    The team of six had an average age of 19.4 when they started the race (one just graduated high school a few weeks ago). Their race was one of competent prudence that outpaced their age. They arrived unscathed, boat intact, and other than burgers on the mind, none the worse for wear and tear.  An amazingly mature group of kids.

    Team BlueFlash: “In the R2AK spirit we’d like to start a tradition for the youngest team in the race. In this bag are our sporks— we’ve all signed them. We’d like the youngest team in the next R2AK to carry them for good luck.”

    Race Boss: “Did you wash them?”

    Team BlueFlash: “No.”

    Proud Dad- Scott: “You guys sailed 218 miles in the last 24 hours!”

    Everyone else: “WOOOHOOOOO!”

    Team Sail Like a Girl: “So, what was it like sailing with a boat full of boys?”

    Maisey (the only girl on Team BlueFlash): "Ha ha! (lots of laughter)

    Team BlueFlash: “I think we’ve proved that a bunch of young and stupid people could sail a really good race!”

    Tim Penhallow- Team Boatyard Boys (Winners in 2015): “Well, thanks for coming and joining the old stupid people!” (laughing).

    As the sun set on the official awards ceremony and the block party that mixed Ketchikan regulars with R2AK’s temporary residents, old and young, stupid and stupid alike. The celebrations continued into the long Alaskan night (really more like an extended twilight!).  Here is the “live video” of the J/88 BLUE FLASH arrival in Ketchikan, Alaska- on Facebook   Follow J/88 Blue Flash on Instagram   Follow the Race 2 Alaska on Facebook here  For more Race 2 Alaska sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
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    * J/22 San Diego YC- Warrior Sailing Returns to the Waters of San Diego

    The Warrior Sailing program will introduce twenty-one new wounded veterans to an intense three-day sailing course using their most natural abilities, teamwork and competitive drive, despite their physical injuries.

    Through a partnership with the Armed Services YMCA and the San Diego Yacht Cub, Warrior Sailing returns to San Diego, a beautiful setting to learn how to sail. The program was founded with a mission to introduce active military and veterans with disabilities to the sport of sailing, with opportunities ranging from introductory level sailing to world championship competition.

    The program offers the Basic Training Camp at no cost to participants. They come from all branches of the military and have varying injuries that range from limb loss, traumatic brain injuries and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, to name a few.

    “We value our partnerships in the San Diego community and always look forward to this event as a highlight of our training calendar.” says Cory Kapes, Warrior Sailing Program Manager. “It is only by working together can we provide an unbelievable experience for the wounded service members who have given so much to us.”

    Participants will sail together in teams of three on J-22 one-design sailboats, with an on-board professional coach. Instruction and equipment is adapted to meet the needs of the participants. The sailboats and facilities are provided by SDYC.

    “SDYC is honored to host the warrior sailing event for the fifth year in a row. We’re hosting 21 wounded warriors from around the U.S., and this week in an extension of our military appreciation night series that runs all summer long. SDYC has many members who are also veterans like me, and supporting this event is another way of giving back to the military community,” expressed SDYC Liaison Pete Whitby.

    Sailing is the platform to help these wounded veterans reunite with their fellow service members, feel the camaraderie they found in service, and help with integration into civilian life.

    Warrior Sailing is an amazing way to support our warriors from the Naval Medical Center– Balboa and across our nation,” says Tim Ney, Executive Director of the Armed Services YMCA. “We are very excited to be a partner with two great organizations.”

    Graduates from the Basic Training Camp will learn about local sailing opportunities and those in their hometowns. Graduates may continue training to earn a keelboat certification, advanced racing skills and compete in open and disabled racing events both across the country and around the world.   More information on the Warrior Sailing Program can be found here

    * Stanford Joines, from St Croix, US Virgin Islands- lost his lovingly maintained J/36 PALADIN in the hurricanes of 2017. 

    For years he plied the waters of the Caribbean, sailing many of the major winter regattas on the racing circuit with a crew consisting ONLY of high-school age kids from the islands (mostly St Croix).

    For the kids, it was a dream come true, and an opportunity to see a world they never knew existed. Here is his latest progress report on hoping to find a lovable J/105 to be donated to their cause for youth development in St Croix and the Caribbean islands.

    Commented Stanford, “we finally have our fiduciary account open at the St. Croix Foundation for Community Development.  As a result, we have a 501c3# for any potential donor (Team Paladin Youth Sailing), learn more about us here.

    St. Croix Foundation is in no way a traditional community foundation. While our portfolio does include strategic grant making, the core of our programmatic format is as an operating foundation.  You can learn more about the St. Croix Foundation here.

    Also, my book is out on Amazon- “Eighth Flag- the untold story of the Caribbean and the mystery of St. Croix’s Pirate Legacy- 1493 to 1750”!

    It is #14 for Caribbean History on Kindle so far, all 5 star ratings!! It is a great summer read.

    I found a famous pirate shipwreck, which then took me on journey of discovery, finding many fascinating stories of a Caribbean long forgotten.  As soon as Netflix buys the rights, we'll get a new J/112e!”

    You can get Stanford’s book here on Amazon (Kindle or Paperback).

    Here is the description of the book:

    “Cannibals.  Conquistadors.  Buccaneers.  Pirates.  Visions of cartoon characters dancing around a cauldron with an explorer tied inside. Balboa gazing on the Pacific Ocean.  De Leon and the fountain of youth. Pizarro conquering the Incas. Henry Morgan, in red, drinking spiced rum.  Smoke curling around Blackbeard as his cutlass slashes through the air. … all children's tales that mean nothing.

    Today, we do not know who any of these people were, how they came to do what they did, or why they did it.  The struggle for power, freedom, and wealth that shaped the Caribbean for two and a half centuries has, since John Barrie created Peter Pan, been relegated to the same literary section as Barney the Dinosaur; yet, underneath the soil of the modern world, the roots are still there.  I started pulling them up on St. Croix, and the roots led to more roots, and more.  Islands connected, nations connected, and legends came to life.

    Officially, St. Croix has flown seven flags over the last 500 years.  Before the American flag and the Danebrog, the Spanish came for gold, the Dutch to trade, the English to raid, and the Knights of St. John to be in charge. The French built a colony only to watch it die of fever.  During all of those years, Pirates, Conquistadors, Freebooters, Filibustiers, Corsairs, Buccaneers- whatever you call them- ruled the Caribbean and called St. Croix home, stealing at sea whether they had 'permission' to do so or not, and paying no attention at all to whatever European flag was flying.  It is time to recognize our eighth flag.  It was black.  This is the untold story of St. Croix and a Caribbean long forgotten.  Come. Sail with me.”  Stan

    * J/100 FLEETWING report from way, way Downeast- thanks for this update from Henry Brauer.

    “Five boats came out to race on Sunday under mostly overcast skies, with better breeze outside the Great Harbor.

    The PHRF Fleet was tight on a beat out around South Bunker Ledge and westward towards Long Ledge. Ranger jumped out to an early lead but was rolled by Dreadnought and Lynnette on the long leeward legs to Baker Island and across to Seal Harbor.

    Fleetwing stayed close to the leaders and made some gains by going south of Sutton’s Island on the second beat up towards Wonderland and Mark L. Lynnette had the lead but gave it all back by favoring the north side of Sutton’s Island on the second beat.

    In the end, it was Dreadnought that crossed the line first, but our J/100 FLEETWING stayed close and kept the gap very narrow, which proved enough to grasp the first victory of 2018!” Add to Flipboard Magazine.

    Read more...
  • J/Newsletter- June 20th, 2018 J/FEST Northwest Regatta Preview
    (Seattle, WA)- The 2018 edition of the J/FEST Northwest Regatta will be hosted by Corinthian YC Seattle and J/Boats Northwest for forty-seven teams that include a PHRF class, and one-design fleets of J/24s, J/80s, J/30s, J/97E’s, J/105s, and J/109s.

    For 26 years, J/Fest NW produced some of the best racing and after-race socializing available on the planet.  This year it is a two-day regatta (with a Friday night PHRF fun race) open to all J/Boats owners and crew.  The on-the-water activities are hosted by Sail Northwest and CYC Seattle.  Shoreside activities will be at the CYC Seattle Shilshole clubhouse Saturday and Sunday.

    Saturday evening’s dinner and door prize extravaganza is always a sellout.  So, come on down and join us for what Northwest Yachting Magazine called “the most looked forward to regatta of the year”- J/FEST Northwest.

    The eight-boat PHRF Division includes a fun, eclectic mix of J’s from across the spectrum of time.  At the top end of the spectrum are the sisterships, the J/46 CLAYMORE (Michael Johnston) and the J/44 ASYLYM (Kyle Caldwell and Jamie Thomas).  At the other end of the scale is the J/32 DRAGONFLY (Anice & Alan Flesher).

    The eleven-boat J/24 class includes some local, notable, celebrities, like TREMENDOUS SLOUCH (Scott Milne) and TUNDRA ROSE (Carl Sheath).

    With eight J/80s, it is the largest turnout ever for this class in the PNW.  Some notable teams are Bryan Rhodes’ CRAZY IVAN and Mike Poole’s JOLLY GREEN (J/80 #1!!).

    The J/97E class has Rocky Smith’s INDIGO HORIZONTAL and Eric Barlow’s IRIE. The J/30 class includes Cindy Gossett’s OUTLAW and Jim Bottle’s CELEBRATION.

    The always-popular J/105 class of eleven teams has just about all the movers and shakers in the PNW participating. In fact, it’s like a class reunion for 105-lovers!  Amongst the 105 cognoscenti are Jim Geros’ LAST TANGO; Tom Kerr’s CORVO 105; Eric Hopper, Matt Davis, Doug Scherk’s FREE BOWL OF SOUP from Portland, Oregon; Chris Phoenix’s JADED; Jerry Diercks’ DELIRIUM; and Ryan Porter’s AVALANCHE.

    Similarly, the five J/109s will be sure to have spirited racing for the Pacific NW Championship Trophy!  Top contenders will certainly include Stu Burnell’s TANTIVY and Jerry Woodfield’s SHADA.  For more J/Fest Northwest Regatta sailing information
     


    Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week Preview
    (Long Beach, CA)- Having one of its best turnouts in years is the annual Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week, hosted by Alamitos Bay and Long Beach YC’s.  With three race areas to manage, the club’s PRO’s have their hands full with large dinghy classes, one-design keelboats (J/70s and J/120s) and large PHRF handicap classes.

    At this time of year, just about anything goes; from the classic “June Gloom” of early morning fog, ultimately burning off to provide decent sailing conditions in the local seabreeze, or the brisk “Santa Ana” conditions that whistle in from the northeast dry and hot and blowing dogs off chains- often well into the 20-30 kts range.  To date, the forecast looks positively like Long Beach Chamber of Commerce conditions- sunny, moderate 6-12 kts winds from the SSE.

    Looking forward to classic SoCal weather will be the half-dozen boat J/120 class.  The usual suspects will be in attendance from the region. As was the case for the earlier San Diego NOOD Regatta, this class can be hard to handicap since they are all well-prepared, with good sails, and the only variables seem to be trimmers and tacticians!  At San Diego, John Laun’s CAPER set the pace early, fast, and never relinquished their lead.  Similarly, Chuck Nichols’ CC RIDER challenged them but could only manage 2nd place.  Third was Ernie Pennell’s MAD MEN.  Planning on upsetting that apple cart will be John Snook’s JIM, Tim Hogan’s SHAMROCK, and Rudy Hasl’s HASL FREE.

    The J/70s from across California have showed up “en masse”, with twenty-nine boats on the starting line from as far afield as Valle de Bravo, Mexico; San Francisco, CA; Puerto Vallarta, Mexico; and even Arizona YC in Arizona!  The entire top five from the San Diego NOODs will be striving to maintain their performance.  Winning was Bennet Greenwald’s PERSEVERANCE, 2nd was Chris Snow’s/ Jeff Brigden’s COOL STORY BRO, 3rd was Jeff Janov’s MINOR THREAT, 4th Chris Raab’s SUGOI, and 5th Fabian Gomez-Ibarra’s VAGAZO from Mexico.

    Looming like a raptor ready to pounce on a kill are several top teams that have notable sailors on board that were not sailing the SD NOOD event.  For starters, there is West Coast J/70 Champion Bruce Golison on MIDLIFE CRISIS, then there’s Argyle Campbell (world famous sailor from Newport Harbor YC that needs no introduction), and, finally, down from San Francisco is Chris Kostanecki’s JENNIFER (a top 3 contender at the 2016 J/70 Worlds on the Bay).  Fun and games it will be to see how the dust settles after the long weekend in this class!

    In the PHRF handicap world, we find Doug & Jack Jorgensen’s J/111 PICOSA racing in PHRF B class.  Then, in PHRF D class there are three J/105s (Scott McDaniel’s OFF THE PORCH, Juan Lois’ ROCINANTE, & Bill Quealy’s J-RABBIT SLIM), Heinz Butner’s J/109 RAPTOR, and David Boatner’s J/35 RIVAL.  In the PHRF Random Leg C class is Paul Stemier’s J/44 PATRIOT, as well as Seth Hall’s J/124 MARISOL. Sailing PHRF Random Leg D class will be Jack Mayer’s J/109 ZEPHYR.  Sailing photo credits- Erin Rustigian and JoySailing.com.  For more Ullman Sails Long Beach Race Week sailing information
     

    J/70 EURO CUP V Regatta Preview
    (Riva del Garda, Italy)- The first pan-European J/70 event took place on the spectacular waters of Lago di Garda in 2014.  As usual, the host club in Riva del Garda- the famous Fraglia de la Riva- played host to a fleet of nearly 50 boats that first year.  In the 4th edition for the 2018 Euro Cup Regatta, a new record fleet of seventy-three entries will be vying for the prestigious trophy.

    J/70s from fourteen nations across the pantheon of Europe (Austria, Belgium, Spain, France, Great Britain, Germany, Italy, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Switzerland, & Turkey) and two international countries (Brazil & Cayman Islands) will be looking forward to three-days of sailing fantasia.

    The famous Lake Garda “wind machine” during the summertime can be scheduled for racing like clockwork.  After a lazy morning breakfast and stroll along the waterfront, the teams assemble at the yacht club and begin to saunter out to the starting area between 12 and 1 pm.  As the breeze builds up to 15-20 kts from the south, the PRO simply sets the standard course and can, generally, conduct three races per day.

    Watch for some of these teams to be factors on the leaderboard over the weekend, Austrian Klaus Diem’s PFANDER, Belgian Patrick Van Heurck’s JAXX, two Brazilians (Mauricio Santa Cruz’s MANDACHUVA and Marcos Soares’ CAPIM CANELA), Cayman Islander Peter Cunningham’s POWERPLAY, Spaniard Jose Maria “Pichu” Torcida’s NOTICIA, British Jeremy Thorp’s PHAN, German Tobias Feuerherdt’s HANDWERKER, six Italians (Carlo Alberini’s CALVI NETWORK, Claudia Rossi’s PETITE TERRIBLE, Luca Domenici’s NOTARO TEAM, Vittorio Di Mauro’s TCL TEAM, Gianfranco Noe’s WHITEHAWK, & Alessandro Zampori’s MAGIE DAS TEAM), Maltese Sebastian Ripard’s CALYPSO, two Monegasques (Ludovic Fassitelli’s JUNDA- BANCA DEL SEMPIONE & Stefano Roberti’s PICCININA), Dutchman Wouter Kollmann’s PLAJ, two Polish (Krzysztof Krempec’s EWA & Pawel Tarnowski’s APOTEX), three Russians (Valerya Kovalenko’s ARTTUBE RUS1, Denis Cherevatenko’s JOYFUL, & Petr Nosov’s JESSIE TANTA), two Swiss (Ruedi Corbelli’s JIM & Julian Flessati’s JILL), and the Turkish Emir Icgoren’s AMEERA JET.  For more J/70 EURO CUP sailing information
     

    J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    It has been a fascinating week of big offshore and round-the-cans events around the world.  For starters, the famous biennial offshore 635nm “thrash to the onion patch” took place this past week.  Co-hosted by the Cruising Club of America and the Royal Bermuda YC, over 170 boats took off on Friday, June 15th to test their mettle crossing the infamously capricious Gulf Stream on their way to the garden of paradise in the mid-Atlantic- Hamilton, Bermuda and its pink beaches.  Most notably, all four J/121’s sailed well, all finishing in the top five in their respective classes, as well as one winning in “the pro division”- their Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division class.

    In Europe, three major events were all taking place at the same time.  For starters, the J/70 Europeans took place in Vigo, Spain for sixty-nine boats, hosted by Real Club Nautico de Vigo.  Then, just north of them on the famous Solent, the IRC Europeans was hosted by RORC’s Cowes clubhouse on the Isle of Wight in Great Britain; the J/112E put on a command performance!  If that were not enough excitement for the week, the inaugural Women’s SAILING Champions League kicked off as part of Kieler Woche (Kiel Week) in Kiel, Germany for ten women’s crews from seven nations across Europe.

    Meanwhile, in the Americas, the craziest offshore sailing adventure yet just started off Port Townsend, WA, the 755nm Race 2 Alaska up the “inside passage” to Ketchikan, Alaska!  Anything goes!  Pedal power, oars, sails, swimming, anything so long as it’s wind, solar, or human-powered.  A souped-up J/88 called BLUE FLASH is sailing and the updates are fun reading below.  Then, there is the “laid-back” edition of Block Island Race Week taking place with an update.  In addition, taking place on the same Saturday as the start of the R2AK was Sloop Tavern YC’s Three Buoy Fiasco, sailed on Puget Sound, off Seattle, WA.

    Read on! The J/Community and Cruising section below has many entertaining stories and news about J/Sailors as well as cruising blogs about those who continue to enjoy the Caribbean and the South Pacific, staying warm while others are trying to stay warm up north.  Check them out!  More importantly, if you have more J/Regatta News, please email it or  upload onto our J/Boats Facebook pag  Below are the summaries.

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Jun 16-24- Kiel Week/ Kieler Woche- Kiel, Germany
    Jun 17-22- Block Island Race Week- Block Island, RI
    Jun 20-23- J/22 North American Championship- Wayzata, MN
    Jun 22-24- J/FEST Seattle- Seattle, WA
    Jun 22- RORC Morgan Cup Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    Jun 22-24- Long Beach Race Week- Long Beach, CA
    Jun 23-25- J/70 EURO CUP V- Riva del Garda, Italy
    Jun 28- Jul 1- Norwegian J/70 National Championship- Hanko, Norway
    Jun 29- Jul 1- New York YC One-Design Regatta- Newport, RI
    Jun 30- Vic-Maui International Yacht Race- Victoria, BC, Canada
    Jul 7-14- J/80 World Championship- Les Sables d’Olonne, France
    Jul 7- Round the Island Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    Jul 7-8- Sail Newport Regatta- Newport, RI

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

    Dramatic Win for ENFANT TERRIBLE @ J/70 Europeans
    (Vigo, Spain)- Final day, final race, final leg.  The dueling leaders fought a titanic struggle right to the finish line.  The protagonists were Alberto Rossi’s ENFANT TERRIBLE and Peter Duncan’s RELATIVE OBSCURITY.  Tied going into the final race, who-beat-who would win the championship.  On the final run to the finish, it was Rossi’s ENFANT TERRIBLE crew that proved their toughness, winning the race, with Duncan’s RELATIVE OBSCURITY taking second.  One could not conceivably write such an insane script to this Hollywood ending.  Needless to say, it will be “party-time” back in Ancona, Italy at the Rossi family household!

    Sixty-nine teams from fifteen countries sailed the 2018 J/70 Class Open European Championship and 2018 J/70 Corinthian Class European Championship. The Real Club Náutico de Vigo in conjunction with the International J/70 Class Association, and J/70 Spanish Class Association organized the event.  Thirteen races were sailed over five days, racing in the stunning Ria de Vigo on the Atlantic coast of Northwest Spain. The Real Club Náutico de Vigo rose to the occasion and rolled out the red carpet for all sailors; it was a fabulous week of sailing and socializing on the western Spanish Riviera!

    “We sailed well as a team and technically speaking and we had a lot of fun, which is the best way to win,” commented Alberto Rossi. “We made a good recovery and we realized the win was possible only in the last race. We are thrilled that the trophy will be going back home with us. Enfant Terrible has won the TP52 Worlds and the Farr 40 Worlds. Both Claudia's team and mine will be in Marblehead, USA trying to win the 2018 J/70 World Championships, we are father and daughter, but we are very competitive with each other. I will also be competing in the Farr 40 Worlds in Chicago this year. I still love the Farr 40 Class and it has many similarities with the J/70; great racing, highly competitive, and a lot of fun,” commented Alberto Rossi- skipper of ENFANT TERRIBLE.

    “Congratulations to Alberto and his team, they sailed very well,” commented RELATIVE OBSCURITY’s Peter Duncan. “We did not perform well towards the end of the regatta and we paid the price. I must say, a big THANK YOU to the organizers, this was a well-organized event both on and off the water, and we have been made very welcome. I am sure we will see some of the top European teams in Marblehead for the Worlds. It is a venue that can give a big variety of conditions, and there will be some very competitive American teams racing.”

    Luis Bugallo's “Marnatura” (ESP) is the 2018 J/70 European Corinthian champion. Bugallo's team (Enrique Freire Faria, Gerardo Prego Menor, Alberto Basadre López, Jorge Lorenzo Romás) representing the host club, Real Club Nautico de Vigo was third in the Open Class. Luis is just 22 years old and is born and bred in Vigo.

    “The team has been fantastic, nearly all of us are under 25. In the last race we had to take a big risk, and it paid off, we are so very happy to win the Corinthian Class in our home Vigo!”

    Runner-up for the Corinthian Class was Paolo Tomsic's Società Nautica Grignano (ITA) and completing the podium was Luis Pérez Canal's Abril Verde (ESP) from the host club, Real Club Nautico de Vigo.   Final day- YouTube sailing video highlights   Follow and share the J/70 Europeans here on Facebook   For more J/70 European Championship sailing information
     

    J/112E J-LANCE 12 Crushes IRC Europeans!
    J-LANCE 12 Wins Class & declared Overall IRC European Champion!
    (Cowes, England)- The Royal Ocean Racing Club hosted a stellar fleet of thirty-three offshore IRC racing teams from nine countries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Great Britain, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Turkey, USA) at their Cowes, Isle of Wight station for the 2018 IRC European Championship. 

    The immaculately sailed J-LANCE 12 was crowned IRC European champion for 2018. The French J/112E skippered by Didier le Moal seemed never to put a foot wrong in the latter stages of this week-long regatta run from Cowes by the Royal Ocean Racing Club.

    "It's great, I didn't expect that," said le Moal of claiming the IRC Europeans title. "First of all, we wanted to win our class. But, this is fabulous to win overall! It concludes the wonderful week we've had. If you enjoy racing, we have been in paradise. The weather, sun, light winds, heavy winds, big tides, everything you could expect to enjoy from racing, we've had it all!”

    Winning Saturday’s first windward-leeward race, held in 15-20 knot winds, was the French team's sixth bullet out of ten races. For the final big breeze, double-points scoring, round-the-cans, cannot discard race, the French had the class win secured, but played it safe.

    "The wind was increasing a bit, so we preferred to sail safely, because we had a big lead. We just wanted to finish well," explained J-LANCE 12's navigator and team secret weapon Nicolas Lunven, the reigning Solitaire du Figaro champion. With the wind gusting into the 30 kts-plus range, they avoided gybing the spinnaker, to avoid breakage.

    In addition to Lunven, le Moal and Fred Bouvier, the J-LANCE 12 crew of Christophe and Cyrille Cremades, Jean Francois Nevo, Jean-Michel Roux and Cyrille Teston are all friends who have sailed with le Moal for years.

    "It is our third season sailing on the J/112E, so we know exactly how it works," continued le Moal. "We had a very, very good navigator - to be fast is one thing, but to be fast on the right side is a good thing! Upwind the boat is so fast, it helps you recover if you had a bad leg someplace!”

    In the final race in IRC Three, J-LANCE 12 placed fourth, simply dominating their fleet with a 20.5 pts total, winning with a 30+ points margin.  As the Queen once asked about how the British Royalty’s yachts did in the first race against the yacht AMERICA in the 100 Guinea Cup Race (now the America’s Cup), the reply was “your Highness, there was no second place.”  That would have been an appropriate response for how the IRC 3 felt after being eclipsed by the French crew on J-LANCE 12.

    What may have really opened up everyone’s eyes was the performance of the J/112E in the windy, blustery 60nm Round Island Race (the original America’s Cup course around the Isle of Wight).  In that race, J-LANCE 12 finished 3rd boat-for-boat in the IRC 2 fleet! A commanding performance it was for the ages. In fact, in what was easily a “big-boat” race for currents and winds, J-LANCE 12 was 3rd overall on handicap time to the first two boats in IRC 1- all full-on stripped-out racing Fast 40s.

    Here is a summary report from Fred Bouvier on their experience sailing J-LANCE 12 in the regatta.

    “The key to our success was the following: good boat, good crew- all friends, and a lot of fun and parties ashore.  While we were extremely focused while sailing, it was the great fun ashore that, for sure, was an important part of our performance.

    In some way, we were amazed by our results and how we performed against very good professional teams and IRC-optimized, stripped-out racing boats.

    Day One- Sunday
    We had light winds and only one windward-leeward race.  Our start was not good!  The room at the RC boat was closed at the gun, so we had to a turnaround in just 5 knots of wind and come back to the start line. There was a very nervous feeling on board, as this was not the best way to start the IRC European Championship.

    Nevertheless, we fully concentrated on our speed and we crossed most of the fleet to round the first windward mark in fifth place!  We were still nervous, as we were not thinking that light wind was our best conditions. But, despite this concern, we were second at the next windward mark and, in fact, passing several IRC Class 2 back-marker boats that started ahead of us!

    Then, we crossed the line just before the wind shut down, thank goodness! Meanwhile, the rest of the fleet was partially parked on the last downwind leg near the finish line, some of them anchoring/ kedging to stay in place because of the current.  With no more wind, the RORC PRO wisely cancelled racing for the day.

    Day Two- Monday
    We had medium to light winds all day and very shifty- 15-25 degree wind shifts and very streaky.  It was “round-the-cans” random leg courses.

    The first race was a reaching start, again not best positioning for first leg, rounding the bottom mark around 9th place.  Then, we recovered to 6th at the second mark.  Then, the next leg gave us a long upwind where we could play wind shifts and we jumped into second place at the 2nd to last mark.  Finally, we passed the Danish X-37 Helly Hansen team to finish first.

    For the second race, it was much shorter, with less upwind.  This time, we finished fourth on corrected time after missing a shift and streak on the final downwind run to the finish.  Halfway down the run it appeared we were winning the race, but the boats to the windward and right of rhumbline passed us.

    Our conclusion was that Danish X-37 Helly Hansen team would be very strong competitors.

    Day Three- Tuesday
    The RORC PRO attempted the classic Round Isle of Wight Race.  However, it was never going to happen, even in our own estimation.  We started upwind heading west down the Solent towards the Needles, after beating for two hours against the tide in very light winds, it was clear it was not going to happen. For the first time on our navigation software, we could see that it was predicting an arrival time at the finish line as "infinite”…ha-ha! Not surprisingly, the race was then canceled!

    The fleet then waited for several hours in the Solent, hoping a seabreeze or gradient breeze would fill in. Finally, late in the afternoon, a streaky wind that kept oscillating from northeast to southeast filled in, blowing 6-12 kts.

    The first race was another long round-the-cans affair.  It was a great one for us!  We beat the Danish X-37 Helly Hansen and the French First 40.7 Pen Koent; winning both on elapsed and corrected time!

    The final race was a very short windward-leeward in light, dying winds. There were a lot of issues playing with the bigger IRC 2 Class in front of us to avoid bad air from their ‘back-markers’.  The X-37 was still fighting hard, but we succeeded in passing them right at the finish line, so we won another race on corrected time.

    That evening, we had an amusing discussion with a JPK 10.10 owner who seemed to be interested in our boat.  Since J-LANCE 12 was for sale, we made an appointment for a meeting on Friday after the races.

    Day Four- Wednesday
    We had one long and intense round-the-cans race all over the Solent in medium winds of 12-17 kts.  It was yet another reaching start (which we did not like, of course).  We spent the entire race working hard to beat the two French teams- the JPK 10.80 Shaitan and the First 40.7 Pen Koent. Surprisingly for us, the Danish X-37 Helly Hansen did not appear to sail as well in the breezier conditions.  As a result, we started to think that maybe it was optimized for light winds and the ORC rule.

    Later, after dinner, I did some research on the Internet and I found the Danish X-37 was 2nd at the ORC Worlds in 2016 and was also rated lower than us in ORC!  Interesting!

    Day Five- Thursday- the Round Island Race!
    This was an amazing day for us!  Finally, we were able to sail the Round the Island clockwise in proper yachting conditions- 20 knots average wind speed, gusting to 27 kts, beating against the strong foul tide for almost three hours!  The fleet split off the starting line, one group of six boats went the north shore route up to Lymington, the other short-tacking along the south shore beneath the Isle of Wight cliffs.

    It was a brilliant windward leg for us- three hours to exit the Solent upwind against the tide, except for the last 30 minutes when it changed. We rounded the Needles mark first in Class 3, but as well first in Class 2 in front of the First 40 and the King 40- they were clearly shocked we were that far in front of our IRC 3 Class!

    The interesting point on the long upwind leg is that we had a small failure in our outhaul purchase system.  So, while we were beating in the middle of class 2 and 3 after having a not so good start, we were tacking every 5 minutes to gain places.  Meanwhile, to fix the outhaul problem, I was working on the aft face of the boom, while we were passing one after another of our competitors that had all crew hiking very hard. I did see some faces on several crews, looking amazed by our performance, especially with me standing to leeward of the boom and wheel doing the repair!

    Then, it was a long downwind run against the tide (again!) where a JPK 10.80 and Sunfast 3600 took the inside line below us for less tide going to St. Catherines Point.  The wind against tide at the St. Catherines “overfalls” made for enormous, steep, breaking waves.  As we passed the point, their position inside was a good gain for them, so we dropped to third place on elapsed.

    However, from that point down to the next turning mark, we stayed within a few boats length of them for the remaining downwind run, as well as the short reaching leg, before heading back west down the Solent for the last long upwind leg.  We were very fast on this leg, going higher and faster than the JPK 10.90 Shaitan and the Sunfast 3600 Redshift Reloaded.

    We were just caught by one Class 2 boat by the finish line.  And, we were fighting the battle to gain back first place in our class, which we did! We crossed the Royal Yacht Squadron line off Cowes about the same time as the Sunfast 3600 and the 3rd place IRC 2 class boat!  Another huge win for the J-LANCE 12 team!

    Our doubts about the Danish X-37 Helly Hansen were true, in more breeze the performance of the boat really dropped off compared to the whole fleet, always looking overpowered or not stable on any point of sail, they finished last in IRC 3 Class.

    Day Six- Friday
    We had two more identical windward-leeeward races in medium winds of 12-17 kts.  In both races, the same scenario played out for us.  We started conservatively and were leading by the first windward mark each time, sailing ahead of the fleet to secure two bullets.

    Day Seven- Saturday Finale
    We had two more races on the final day.  The first one was yet another windward-leeward race.  Just like the day before, in 17-23 kts of breeze, it was a conservative start, and then we led all the way around the course for another bullet.

    Then, the final race was a double-counter that could not be discarded!  It was a long round-the-cans “Solent Tour”, with wind forecast to 25 knots and gusting over 28 knots. With such a big lead on points, we decided to sail conservatively and avoid any wipeouts or breaking something that would force us to retire. On top of that, the previous night saw an even longer and fun party than the previous one!  So, several crew were quite tired and not at full capacity!

    Despite sailing one reaching leg without spinnaker, while everyone on board was feeling a bit embarrassed, we finished 4th to secure the win with a 30 points ahead of the French First 40.7 Penn Koent.

    It was a fantastic week and the highlight was for sure the boat and its performance.  I am still astonished by how she achieved this performance, while being a pure cruiser-racer and carrying a lot of comfort inside.

    The other success factor was the crew; we know each other quite well, and we had a good experience sailing the J/112E.

    Nevertheless, most importantly, we had what I called the “fun factor”- spending good times ashore all together and not taking this too seriously.  We know the other professional crews went to sleep early and were up at sunrise each day.  Not us! We would enjoy our morning coffees and croissants and stroll back down to the boat again in time to leave the docks each day.

    Finally, the RORC Race Committee and their PRO- Stewart Childerley- deserve a strong congratulations as they ran the event better than everyone could imagine.”

    Chris Stone, Racing Manager of the Royal Ocean Racing Club commented, "The IRC Europeans and Commodores' Cup have been an overriding success and all the competitors are happy. The racing has been a complete test with the full range of strong tides, heavy weather, light conditions and sun and rain. There were a couple of standout performances and I congratulate J-LANCE 12 crew as worthy winners. Otherwise, the racing was incredibly close at this third European Championship, showing that IRC remains in great health."  For more IRC European Championship sailing information
     

    J/121 APOLLO Wins Bermuda Race
    1st Gibbs Hill Class, 6th Overall!  15 of 29 J’s Finish Top 5 in Class!
    (Newport, RI)- The 51st running of the biennial offshore classic- the Newport to Bermuda Race was a relatively benign affair, with maximum winds barely pushing 15 kts and most of the time chasing zephyrs and wind-streaks across the Atlantic Ocean.  No speed records, for sure in the Maxi class. Famous bowman on George David’s R88 RAMBLER, Newport’s Jerry Kirby, was overhead saying on the bow as they approached Bermuda, “I’ve never done a race with George where we had no water over the bow! That’s crazy! What ‘thrash to the patch’? More like a mid-summer night’s cruise to paradise- Bermuda shorts, Gosling’s dark’n’stormies, and pink beaches here we come!”

    And, with 75% of the fleet finishing between midnight Tuesday and Wednesday morning Bermuda time, it was more like a giant “raft-up in company” kind of race.  There were no outliers either east or west that did well.  Just about everyone could see each other the whole race and if you launched a drone up to 5,000 ft (easy to do), you would have captured half the fleet in one shot!

    The action started at 1300 hrs EDT Friday, June 15 from Newport, Rhode Island, just beneath the famous Castle Hill Inn & Lighthouse at the port end of the starting line. It was not the “thrilla from Manila”, more like a slow and steady progression, trudging slowly through Chicago O’Hare’s security line, all heading somewhere along the 162-degree rhumbline to Bermuda.

    The forecasts held true, the light northerly dying and the SSE winds building slowly from 4-6 kts at the start to SSW winds offshore overnight.  Thank goodness it was a strong ebb-tide at the first starting gun at 1305 hrs.  Had that not been the case, the start would’ve been chaotic.  As the final Maxi Class and Superyacht Class’s started, the fleet was well on its way to the Onion Patch with SSW winds of 7-12 kts.

    The vast majority of the fleet endured a rather bizarre scenario offshore.  The big, fast boats basically rode the remnants of a micro-Low, then micro-High to whisk them along most downwind/ reaching to Bermuda; specifically, the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse division maxis- Rambler 88, the Maxi 72 Proteus, and the two Volvo 70s.  That group separated quickly into a separate system with a moderate northerly flow and rode it to Bermuda to make up the top five overall in the Gibbs Hill division. Behind them, the weather systems simply deteriorated into nothingness, with wind veering back into the northerly quadrants and dying, with numerous “park-ups” from east to west across the rhumbline for the main body of the fleet.  Ultimately, the forecasted southwesterlies and westerlies from an approaching front materialized and those that held to the west of rhumbline faired better than their colleagues off to the east.

    Benefitting from that unfolding scenario was Don Nicholson’s J/121 APOLLO, finishing at twilight on Wednesday at 0322 hrs for a corrected time class win of 62:21:35 hrs (elapsed of 108:12:52) in the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division Class 14.  Taking third in class the Leonid Vasiliev’s custom J/120 DESPERADO correcting out just 30 minutes back. As a result, overall under ORR Handicap, the J/121 APOLLO was 6th corrected time behind the obvious winners in the “breakaway” group in front of the fleet- the two Volvo 70s, Maxi 72, Rambler 88, and a TP52.  Fast company, indeed!  A great debut offshore for the APOLLO team!

    Similarly, the two J/121’s sailing in the St. David’s Lighthouse Division Class 9 (Joe Brito’s INCOGNITO & David Southwell’s ALCHEMY) sailed fast, but ultimately made a fateful decision around 1400 hrs Monday afternoon, gybing east nearly tangential to rhumbline to head further east.  It was a move that would seal their fate after leading for much of the race.  They were caught a bit too far to the east as the forecasted SW to W winds filled in.  As a result, despite alternating provisional leadership of their class halfway through the race, both boats ended up finishing nearly at the same time as their sistership APOLLO.  Joe Brito’s INCOGNITO finished at 0246 hrs Wednesday to take 4th in class, and David Southwell’s ALCHEMY finished at 0336 hrs to take 5th.

    In the St David’s Lighthouse Division Class 6, Andrew Hall’s J/121 JACKHAMMER suffered a similar fate as INCOGNITO and ALCHEMY, getting just a bit too far to the east Monday afternoon as the southwest/west winds started to drift across the race course and power everyone in the big pack on starboard tack towards Bermuda on fast-reaching angles. As a result, they took the bronze in their class, missing the class win by just over 40 minutes- easily the distance they gave up going too far east.

    In the Double-handed Division Class 3, Steve Berlack’s J/42 ARROWHEAD sailed a strong race, working their way to the west of rhumbline at the appropriate time on Monday afternoon and reaped the benefits to take the bronze!  Taking 5th place was Gardner Grant’s J/120 ALIBI.

    In the SDL Class 5, Fred Allardyce’s J/40 MISTY managed a 3rd, while Eliot Merrill’s J/42 FINESSE placed 5th.

    What was tantamount to being the sole “J/Boats” division was SDL Class 7- six J/120s and four J/122s in a class of fourteen boats!  The very experienced J/120 teams (many whom have multiple Bermuda Races to their credit) swept the first four spots; leading was Rick Oricchio’s ROCKET SCIENCE, 2nd Richard Born’s WINDBORN, 3rd, John Harvey & Rick Titsworth’s SLEEPING TIGER, and 4th Brian Spears’ MADISON.  All went west of rhumbline at the critical juncture of 1600 hrs on Monday afternoon heading for the southwesterlies.  The first J/120 beat the first J/122 into the island finish line by over one hour.

    With a number of Bermuda veterans, it was going to be interesting to see how the SDL Class 8 would unfold.  In the end, it was Mike McIvor’s J/133 MATADOR that salvaged (believe it or not) a third place on the podium after leading boat-for-boat of all J’s for the first 2/3 of the race.  Yes, it was the same SW/W gradient that nearly did them in too by getting a bit too far east.  Taking fifth was Len Sitar’s J/44 VAMP and sixth was Chris Lewis’ KENAI.

    In the Finisterre Division (cruising class) Class 13, Howie Hodgson’s J/160 BLUE took fifth place.

    In the final analysis, perhaps the most shocking statistic is that out of the 29 J’s racing Bermuda, fully half of them managed a top five finish in class! As for podium finishes, two Golds, one Silvers, five Bronzes for a total of eight medals- nearly 1/3 of all J/teams entered podiumed.  Pretty good odds/bets in the greater scheme of things!  As J/sailors have learned/ discovered over time, a well-balanced boat that can sail in all-around conditions ultimately prevails, and often wins!

    Sailor Girl- Nic Douglass- interview with Brad Willauer- Commodore of the CCA and owner of the J/46 BREEZIN UP   For more Newport to Bermuda Race sailing information
     

    KDY Tops Women’s SAILING Champions League
    (Kiel, Germany)- The inaugural Women’s SAILING Champions League took place at Kieler Woche in northern Germany on the southeastern part of the Baltic Sea. With 10 teams from six nations, the Royal Danish Yacht Club (KDY) and Hellerup Sejlklub made it a one-two victory for Denmark.

    Kongelig Dansk Yachtclub, aka the Royal Danish Yacht Club, won the inaugural event of the brand-new Women’s SAILING Champions League. Over the three days of the regatta which took place from June 16th to 18th June during Kieler Woche, two Danish crews dominated the league racing in J/70 keelboats. There were all kinds of weather conditions over the three days, but the final day saw spectacular conditions with a southwesterly breeze blowing at 11 to 13 knots.

    Each team competed in 20 races across the three days, and the Royal Danish Yacht Club rarely finished out of the top two in any race. Strangely, the final heat proved to be their worst score, although that 4th place didn’t matter because the crew with skipper Henriette Koch, Anne-Sofie Munk-Hansen, Tina Schmidt Gramkov, Helle Ørum Ryhding and Lotte Meldgaard Pedersen had already notched up a commanding lead in the standings.

    Koch, who represented Denmark at the London 2012 Olympic Games, commented, “I think it’s a pleasure we’re starting a new tradition– a new way of sailing. It’s great to be the winning team in the first event. On top of that, I think it’s brilliant to finally have a women’s sailing championship!”

    Hellerup Sejlklub (Trine Abrahamsen, Christina Otzen, Katrine Munch Ejlev, Ida Hartvig, & Lærke Marie Sørensen) finished in second place. Both Danish teams were some way ahead of the chasing pack that were focused on who would grab the final podium place going into the last heat of the competition.

    A first place in the last race gave Akademischer Segelverein Warnemünde team (Johanna Meier, Carolin Junker, Pia Sophie Wedemeyer, Andrea Aachenbach, Lisa Schälke) third place overall, just one point ahead of fellow German team from Deutscher Touring Yacht Club (Laura Fischer, Anna Seidl, Mareike Weber, Monika Linder, Linda Weber) that finished on equal points with Dutch entry International Yacht Club Amsterdam (Rikst Dijkstra, Fettje Osinga, Milah Wouters, Irena Doets, Sanne Crum).

    Nynne Desirée Ammundsen from ISLA (International Sailing League Association) said, “It’s been a blast! Following 50 competitive women on 10 teams from different nations sailing in Kiel is a really good start. This is only the beginning. We have established a strong base and a solid foundation to make sure the Women’s SAILING Champions League concept goes from strength to strength. Having sailors from different nations, classes, levels and ages is exactly what ISLA is working towards, developing the league format. It’s great to see sailors respond so positively to this format.”

    SAP Sailing Analytics provided 24/7 additional statistics and data for sailors, fans, spectators and media like GPS tracking, real-time analysis, and live leaderboard combined with 2D visualization. You can find all results on SAPsailing.com (http://wwww.sapsailing.com)!   For more Women’s SAILING Champions League sailing information
     

    Cleveland Race Week Off To Hot Start!
    J/22s, J/70s, J/105s See Dominating Performances
    (Cleveland, OH)- The highly-popular Cleveland Race Week started last weekend on the waters of Lake Erie, hosted by the Edgewater Yacht Club for just one-design classes- J/22s, J/70s, and J/105s.

    The seven-boat J/22 class saw a near whitewash by Ryan Lashaway’s DEUCE team, posting a 1-2-1-1 tally for 5 pts.  No one else was even close.  It was really a battle for the balance of the podium.  In the end, it was Jason Goscha’s DOUBLE-J that took the silver with a consistent 4-3-4-2 for 13 pts.  Third was Anna Huebschmann’s ESCAPE with an equally consistent scoreline of 3-6-2-6 fro 17 pts.

    The thirteen-boat J/70 fleet saw the dynamic duo of Lee Sackett & Dave Kerr simply eviscerate the fleet, starting off with five straight bullets, then backing off on the gas to take a deuce in their last race, closing with just 6 pts total!  Ouch.  Fellow family member Tod Sackett upheld the family honor by taking 2nd place with 21 pts total. Third was the “Jamaican Sailing Team- Sminchak/ Moose” on SPIFFIT with 23 pts.

    The seven-boat J/105 class had an insanely inconceivable three-way tie on 4 pts after just two races sailed!!  No one would ever believe this wackiness!  So, Robert Mock’s UNBRIDLED scored a 3-1. Ron Carson’s DARK’N’STORMY posted a 1-3.  And, coincidentally, who got the two 2nds?? Doh! The Uhlir Brothers’ TRIO took the 2-2.  How crazy is that?  So, the countback/ tiebreak worked in Mock’s favor, winning over Carson in 2nd and the Uhlir’s in third!  For more Cleveland Race Week sailing information
     

    Block Island Race Week Update
    (Block Island, RI)- The Duck Island Yacht Club in Westbrook, Connecticut and the Block Island Yacht Club have teamed up to co-host Block Island Race Week 2018. The event will feature five days of racing (2 per day) on Block Island Sound June 17th to the 22nd.

    In a “Bermuda Race” year, the event has always been much more laid back with a smaller fleet of boats.  Nevertheless, the camaraderie is proportionately greater as everyone seems to know everyone sailing in the regatta.  That quaintness, in fact, serves as its appeal for many sailors that simply want a relaxing “sailing vacation.”

    A number of J/crews have answered that call of competitive, but laid-back random leg races, not all that windward-leeward, rest, rinse, repeat, again and again in monotonous fashion kind of stuff.  This year’s DIYC and BIYC PRO’s have promised to make it fun, easy, and not too many sets and takedowns each day!  In the PHRF Spinnaker division, a total of eight boats are sailing, half of it J/teams.  Three J/111s are racing; Sedge & Andy Ward’s BRAVO, Greg Slamowitz’s MANITOU, and Kenn Fischburg’s WILD CHILD.  Joining them is a very fast J/29, John Hammel’s appropriately named SLEEPER from Noroton YC. Sailing in the PHRF Non-Spin Class is Peter Hilgendorff’s J/29 MEDDLER. Should be fun!   BIRW Sailing results here   For more Block Island Race Week sailing information
     

    ’Twas A 3BF Fiasco Alright!
    J/109 Horizon Jobs Class!
    (Seattle, WA)- Yes, indeed, the Sloop Tavern YC’s Three Buoys Fiasco race course of NSJMN for a distance of just 13.46nm was a fiasco in the making.  In the end, it seemed like just about every boat from a J/27 up to J/109s completed the course in about 2 to 2.5 hours, such were the conditions, a range of 5.38 kts to 6.73 kts for any boat that floated! LOL.

    In the end, it’s supposed to be “fun & games”.  Which it was.  Chalk it up for the notoriously fun-loving Sloop Tavern YC in Seattle, WA to host another laid-back “Three Buoys Fiasco” race!

    After a rather “reachy” course setup, even an Optimist dinghy might have covered the course in 2-2.5 hours.  Seems like everyone could do around 6.5 kts on this one.

    Organized chaos it was.  In the Class 4 FS division, Ulf Georg Gwildis’ J/30 IMPULSIVE secured a 4th.

    The Class 5 FS division had Leo Morales immaculate J/27 WIZARD snatch the silver, while Lek Dimarucot’s J/80 UNDERDOG closed the podium with a bronze.

    Class 6 FS had a trio of J/105s.  At best they could manage was a third- with Jeremy Boyne’s’ AVALANCHE landing on the podium.  Fourth was Jim Geros’ LAST TANGO and fifth Phil LeMouel’s LIFTOFF.

    Finally, in Class 7 FS it was Jerry Woodfield’s J/109 SHADA that won by far with the largest margin of any class winner in the race- over 11 minutes on the short course on corrected time.  That happened to be at the expense of J-colleague Bill Daniel’s pretty J/100 TOURIST that took second!  For more Three Buoy Fiasco sailing information

    BLUE FLASH- Race 2 Alaska Update
    (Port Townsend, WA)- On Saturday, June 16th, the infamous Race to Alaska started off Port Townsend, WA for the first qualifying leg of 40nm.  Then, on Monday, June 18th, the “real race” took off to Ketchikan, Alaska for over 735nm up fearsome straits with currents up to 15 kts, tornado-puffs pealing down hillsides like 40 kts microbursts gales, and even snow midsummer off the Canadian maritime provinces of British Columbia and the “inside passage” north to Alaska.  The weather can be fearsome.  A race not for the faint of heart, that is for sure.

    Scott Grealish’s son Sean and five other crew members all under-25 are sailing their J/88 BLUE FLASH and hope to be the first boat to finish and win a cash prize of $10,000.  That they even finish will be a reward in itself as the youngest adventurers ever to accomplish that feat. Here are some of Scott’s daily updates on their progress north to Ketchikan.

    June 18th- Monday- 2035 hrs Pacific
    Quick update for those who didn't stay up half the night watching the tracker :)

    The team made an incredible start out of the harbor, and worked really hard to build a lead in super light air and against current in the early going.  Really good stuff.

    They had a tough decision to make at Turn point, and in the pre-race briefing, we had discussed going out of Boundary pass if they were late to this point.....but they went inside in a gamble to get up to Active pass before the current turned against them.....and it almost worked!!

    At that point, with just a few more knots of breeze, they could have punched out into the straights and had a commanding lead.  It wasn't to be.

    They made a choice to go north to the next pass, Portlier, which had a 3 am window of slack to allow them through...but they were fighting the ebb current in light air and you can see on the tracker that they bailed out and just hung around Active pass for hours waiting for their chance to get through there instead. I'm pretty sure that was a decision based on fatigue from a long hot day of pedaling and light air sailing.

    In reality, if you got to turn point late and elected to go inside, you needed to 100% commit to going up to Portlier (as the race winning PT watercraft did).  That would have put them right where he is now, literally 25 miles at least ahead.

    But as luck had it, the outside boats got just enough breeze to creep up north overnight, and the tough luck is that today the southerly boats haven't gotten the wind (as we expected) and so the boats in front will extend the lead and things look pretty grim for now.

    BUT, that same idea works both ways, and here is my two cents on what's up next.

    The light air zones in the straights will persist with all this high pressure today....and there may be some southerly even at times and places that could bring them back.  But by late tonight/early am there should be real southerly breeze that could bring the fleet back up towards the leaders.

    PLUS, the next big "gate" to get past is Seymour Narrows....and if the leaders get there any time other than slack, they have to wait up to six hours.  So once again, a little luck can either get you way up the course or bring back the fleet to you.

    The next wild card is the actual Johnstone Straight.  They can get past the narrows by pedaling (it's short) but all the teams will be very challenged if the light air continues as forecast and they have to manage the entire straight under mostly human power.....  The team knows this, and the pre-race plan was to pack in the sleep today/ tonight so they can power thru.

    Once the leaders (whoever they are) clear that hurdle, they will be very hard to catch.  It's been a crazy race so far!

    June 19th- Tuesday- 0900 hrs Pacific
    Wow!  Big gains overnight for Team Blue Flash.  As expected, the southerly breeze came and brought them back into this race.  I'm sure there are smiles onboard this morning, as they are finally getting a chance to show they are good sailors.

    They took 10 miles out of almost everyone, sailing away from the Olson 30 Dreamcatcher, and taking time out of the leaders.

    I'll reveal my secret weapon now:  It's called the A2PHRF kite.  At 103 sq meters, it's much bigger up top than the typical 89 sqm J/88 kite.  Great for this stuff.  Version one took us to several victories (until Cal Offshore week when it went from 20 to 30 knots quickly and Andrew H (included here so I can tease him yet one more time :)  found out that at 19 knots boat speed even he can't keep the J/88 from wiping out when the rudder cavitates!)  So, we shredded that one.

    But version two was cut even better for some reaching, and used only in the Mac race (served us well).  New sails are fast!

    The big story:  The girls are nearing the tidal gate at Seymour Narrows, but they are going to miss the 10:30 ebb by a hair!  That means they get their turn to sit while the Blueflash gets until 4:30 to get there.  So, it's race restart at Seymour Narrows!!!

    Then they all go thru and guess what?  It's a 10.6kn flood!  So, they all sit on the other side in Brown's bay until 11pm.  Then when they finally get the ebb....there won't  be any real wind!

    So, it's river sailing in light wind and current.  Sean and Grant have been racing in that condition since they were 8!  I like their chances.  Going to be tricky at night too.... This just got interesting.....

    June 20th- Wednesday- 1235 hrs Pacific
    Got a great text around noon from the team:  "Team is in really good spirits.  Great trip so far".  After worrying about them half the night getting thru the Seymour Narrows and Johnstone Straits, that was a good text!

    Sean started dreaming about this race two years ago, watched every video, analyzed all the tracks, talked to prior participants, and set out with one goal:  Create an all youth team and be the youngest to finish R2AK.

    I bring that up because, naturally, in the prep and early stages of this R2AK, they clearly were out there with competitive ambitions. I'm thinking right about now they are stepping back and realizing that R2AK is really all about challenging yourself in the company of like-minded (crazy) people.  And, they are having a great adventure!

    For the moment, they look good coming through Johnstone Straits without getting into big headwinds. The leaders are about 30 miles up the course, but considering the team stopped for a few tidal gates on the race so far, it's actually pretty cool there is this much company near the front of the fleet.

    I think things could get closer, actually, as the leaders enter back into the channels to Bella Bella and the chasers look like they'll be reaching fast. And, a forecasted gale will slow the others down, while the J/88 can keep sailing!

    I think Russell Brown on PT Watercraft (solo guy on a Gougeon catamaran, who stops every night) is sleeping more than I am this week!

    Remember, they will lose cell coverage soon, so not likely to hear much until Bella Bella. I'll relay any sat phone updates I receive.

    June 20th- Wednesday- 2335 hrs Pacific
    I got a call from Sean. All good.  They tried to get out of Johnstone Strait, but got flushed back. No wind, much more current than charts suggest.

    Trying again on this next cycle.

    Conditions change quickly and don't reflect what we see online. Talks five minutes, then wind built from dead to over 15 kts. “Gotta go Dad”!

    He confirmed they missed Active Pass by 45 minutes, so the ten mile lead turned into a ten mile loss. They tried for Portlier, but couldn't make berthing/ docks against the current. Their pedal drive is not up to the other leaders level- like the “girl power” in front of them.

    He said the leaders went thru Seymour Narrows with nearly max ebb in no breeze (up to 15 kts!). Gutsy call. They would have had double that current, so they waited. They skipped the next slack to flood, as they didn't think they could get into Brown's Bay and would get flushed back through Seymour Narrows!

    In any event, they timed their Johnstone Straits run perfectly, to get to Helmken Island, as planned, and out of the powerful currents flowing down Johnstone Straits.

    They know about the dissolving omega block, approaching Low (depression), gale warning for Johnstone Strait.  That should help them a lot against the leaders- the J/88 can handle that, not so sure about the others!

    They are going to need water and battery recharge in Bella Bella and plan to stop.

    They are thinking things through and playing it conservative.

    They told me to tell Stu Johnstone that you can hit a large floating tree at 5 knots going upwind in a J/88 and it doesn't leave a scratch!

    I guess that proves the logs don't go away at night....Go BlueFlash!

    More news when it’s fit to print next week!  Or, follow “LIVE” at the links below.  Fascinating race!!

    Follow the Race 2 Alaska on Facebook here   For more Race 2 Alaska sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
    * Here is the tale of Rich Stearns, his all-women crew, and how they learned to “Put the Dawg on It”!

    Richie sailed the J/88 HOKEY SMOKE in this year’s J/88 class at the Chicago NOOD on Lake Michigan.  His crew was comprised of the following women:
    • Denise Anhurst - first NOODs
    • Annie Baumann- crew chief
    • Kristin Camarda- first NOODs
    • Marcella Grunert
    • Freya Olsen
    • Ann Zeiler
    • Joy Wilson
    Following is Richie’s story of sailing with seven (7) women on a J/88:

    Chicago, the home of many competitive fleets and active sailing, recently hosted the 30th annual Helly Hansen NOODs, June 8th-10th. A popular and successful event, which many Chicago racers hibernate throughout the arctic winter to rally to enjoy their first sip of summer, the Chicago NOODs is always looked forward to as a hallmark of the beginning of racing season. True to Chicago’s knack for unpredictable weather, this year’s NOODs had its fair spread of conditions including: storms, light and moderate air, rain, and the unusual, but always surprising, fog.

    The fog was not the only surprise. This year, J/88 HOKEY SMOKE owner Rich Stearns made the decision to build his program off the strength and fitness of “girl-power”. Bringing various levels of experience together was going to be a challenge, his all-women crew ranged from mid-twenties to mid-fifties. Racing with an all-women crew is not common in the male-dominated sport of sailing.

    The J/88 fleet in Chicago continues to grow, and eight teams came out for the Chicago NOODs.  The class in Chicago is competitive and will be hosting the J/88 North Americans come August, with over 20 boats expected on the line. During the NOODs, a few other boats carried one or two women crew, but none were fully crewed with women as HOKEY SMOKE was. With postponements held all three mornings, it made the thirst for competition even stronger, as there would be limited races to test/ train the team. Making efforts more difficult, with only two races a day, HOKEY SMOKE’s newly-assembled crew was under pressure to rapidly improve versus the seasoned J/88 crews on the starting line.

    Stearns’ green crew, started at the bottom of the pack, and worked their way together as a team to finish the final race of the regatta with a third in fleet!

    But, as with any good result, improvement takes time and focus.

    On Day 1, the weather, crew work and maneuvers proved to be challenging and offered lots of opportunity for improvement. The AP was signaled at 08:45 and not dropped until 12:00. As HOKEY SMOKE went out to course, they went through the responsibilities of positions, but with limited time before the first sequence to practice tacks, trim and sets. With the first practice set, and a shakeout of some cobwebs, the chute finally came down. It looked like a cat on a leash. It just did not look right.

    Annie, trimmer, commented to her pitman, Freya, and fellow trimmer, Joy, that it just did not fall well. “That’s gonna be a not good for me,” Annie stated in low, stern voice.

    Freya quickly replied, “That’s gonna be a no for me, too, dawg!”

    And, so the expectation of real crew improvement was born. The team quickly debriefed and checked the kite. With little time before the start sequence, a little more banter was exchanged and the crew agreed there would be no more cats on the leash.

    “We gotta put a dawg on it ladies!” the crew chief kept coaching. As the first race would sound off, the HOKEY SMOKE team would see where stood against the rest of the pack.

    Placing last in the first race, the boat was moving slow.  But, the crew attitude and spirit was eager to improve their performance. Small communications and adjustments were made. And, trust was being built.

    “The secret sauce to competitive sailing is crew mates trusting each other,” commented Denise, first time NOODs competitor. “What is unique to HOKEY SMOKE is Rich and his crew’s commitment to establishing a learning environment whereby each crew member can improve their skills.”

    Rich debriefed after each race and encouraged crew participation, both to learn and figure out the key boat mechanics and sail trim that were contributing to our lagging performance.

    He communicated in layman's term clearly. Cool as a cucumber, never once did he stress his decibels during a foul or slow maneuver. Ever so patient, he carefully identified and provided insight to teach and support his crew. To which his team responded well and followed suit, each of the teammates respectfully teaching another, never squishing toes.

    The biggest challenge for the boat would be the roundings. The leading boats BANTER and EXILE were a guide as we saw their spinnakers wonderfully fill and launch right at the mark. It was clear the HOKEY SMOKE chute was not getting that pop-out like the other boats, and was a failure to launch. The halyard was either too quick on the hoist, filling the chute halfway, or too delayed, the clew catching on the lifeline. The starboard jib sheet was another factor. So was a graceful and clean douse.

    The timing of hoisting a spinnaker happens very quickly, and when it is done just right, it’s “Goldie Locks”.

    During the first two days, we had switched the positions at the mast; which changed up the tempo and groove. The command to hoist was getting confused with nearby boats hoisting, as well as “get ready to hoist”. The women crew, as great communicators, quickly established key words and lexicon to clarify the timing and the execution of the maneuver. Ironing out any confusion, the term “bang it” was defined as the proper announcement of when to hoist. By the last race of the day, we were in a groove and were able to dance around the weather mark with a good chute set.

    Another flaw that we witnessed was that the starboard jib sheet was loaded on the winch at the roundings, not being released when we were furling the jib. The sheet stalled the process, causing some confusion and, more importantly, shadowing the spinnaker from filling and letting the boat take-off. We figured out that the sheet was being loaded from former port lay line tack approaching the rounding. But on a starboard lay line, it had been left on, when there was no need for it.  As a crew, a good team is constantly figuring out the “go fast” tricks, or slips that might be dragging you down, keeping the sheet free while approaching the mark was the solution.

    The take down of the chute always requires careful coordination. Although it’s a step-by-step process, part of racing is that not everything goes as planned. Another source of excitement was “just in time” communications from back of the boat regarding the style of douse. From leeward to Mexican, it was important that the front of the boat be ready on the correct side, and that if a last second decision was made, the crew in front was synchronized with the back of the boat. The bowman on the first day, out of sync, began to bring the chute down by the clew and the leech. During a debrief, a crew-mate went up to explain that, collapsing the foot first on the chute during the leeward roundings is the quickest way to decrease the sail area of a spinnaker, making it ineffective as a sail. Making a triangle with her hands, she collapsed her the thumbs (foot), and showed how the head of the sail theoretically collapses easily down.

    Although elementary to a veteran racer, there were many small, yet significant maneuvers that were crucial to boat speed and performance against the competition.  The numerous examples of women teaching and trusting each other to create solutions were a wonderful affirmation that sex doesn’t determine skill. To achieve skill is the opportunity to experience, to be given the chance, to improve and become a good racer. A good racer, is eager, willing to learn, and passionate. Over the weekend, there was no lack of passion, good humor, and competitive desire on HOKEY SMOKE. It can be said that some ladies are like cats, but this crew was determined to play with the boys, and “put a dawg on it.”

    Over the series, the HOKEY SMOKE crew concluded that whenever beginning something new it is much like, a cat on the leash. But, the effort and motivation to succeed, to do better, to work together, and to have fun while doing it, is what racing is about in any team and sport for that matter. To, “put a dawg on it”, is not only about having a positive humor to improve, but also to do it with a little sass and style, and willingness to identify things that are not working on the boat, and to overcome the obstacles. The phrase became a mantra for the ladies and Stearns, and was a tool that reinforced the new crew skills and communication.

    After a few lumps, bumps and a cat’s meow or two, let the record show that HOKEY SMOKE showed up to play, took that cat off the leash, and “put the dawg on it.” They look forward to all the catcalls and barks throughout the season. Congratulations to teams BANTER, EXILE and WINDSONG for their standing on the podium. Thank you to Chicago Yacht Club and Helly Hansen NOODs for running a wonderful, competitive, fun regatta. And greatest thanks to Rich Stearns, for improving and growing the presence of women in sailboat racing.   Watch a fun, amusing video of the HOKEY SMOKE team on Facebook here

    * Recently, it was a “life-time” moment on the J/41 SOUAY1 in the Samui Regatta 2018 for Jean Rheault (owner) and his friends.  Here are Jean’s comments:

    “The Samui Regatta (http://www.samuiregatta.com) is a major event in the China Sea, located in the Doldrums latitudes, with light winds and a few violent clouds and thunder showers in the mid-afternoons- typical of our climate here.

    As a boat owner, I had the great happiness to have my J/41 SOUAY1 sailed singlehanded up to Thailand. I also felt very proud to invite guests for a ride on her after I installed a full teak deck with an integrated elegant and comfortable teak cockpit (all Burma teak, of course, of the best grade possible I could find!).

    But now, my happiness was to invite offshore sailors to join my team and, hopefully, sail her fast and smart.

    To keep weight low, the strategy was to have a limited crew for the Samui Regatta.  We had aboard:
    • Ray Waldron, an Australian wave surfer, who also races his Etchells,
    • Cedric Rimaud, a passionate French owner of three classic 6-meters, and
    • Guido Wedekind, a German professional fighter, who lived for years on his 54 ft wooden sailboat.
    The multiple tasks required for around-the-cans racing placed a very high demand for the small crew on our old 41 ft IOR One Tonner- designed by the famous J/Boat co-founder, Rodney Johnstone.

    Nevertheless, I am sure you can imagine the satisfaction of everyone onboard our SOUAY1 after a week of sailing the regatta- winning six of seven races!  We even crossed ahead of several modern IRC designs in some of the races with light wind spots and tidal current.  The old J/41 is quite fast in that light air, flat-water conditions!  She is perfectly suited for those conditions here because we see a lot of it throughout the year (monsoon season, notwithstanding!).

    We hope you enjoy some of the photos from our experiences sailing the famous J/41 here in our waters off Thailand and winning the famous Samui Regatta Cup.  Wonderful boat. Fantastic, fun crew!  Thank you all.”  Thanks for the contribution from proud J/41 owner- Jean Rheault.
    Add to Flipboard Magazine.

    Read more...
  • J/Newsletter- June 13th, 2018 Newport to Bermuda Race Preview
    (Newport, RI)- This year’s Newport Bermuda Race is the 51st running of the biennial offshore race.  The action starts at 1300 hrs EDT Friday, June 15 from Newport, Rhode Island, just beneath the famous Castle Hill Inn & Lighthouse at the port end of the starting line. Beginning in 1906, it is the oldest regularly scheduled ocean race, and one of very few international distance races.

    The purpose of the Bermuda Race was stated in 1923 by Cruising Club of America Commodore Herbert L. Stone: “In order to encourage the designing, building, and sailing of small seaworthy yachts, to make popular cruising upon deep water, and to develop in the amateur sailor a love of true seamanship, and to give opportunity to become proficient in the art of navigation”.

    This year’s event is expected to be the fourth largest in the race’s history, with approximately 170 boats. The race attracts sailors from across North America and the globe; the fleet is extremely diverse, a total of 23 countries are represented in the crews.

    Depending on the weather and the currents in the Gulf Stream, and the boat’s size and speed, the race takes two to six days. The first boat arrives at the finish line off St. David’s Lighthouse on Sunday or Monday, and the smaller boats arrive between then and Wednesday or Thursday.

    The race is demanding. The rules say, “The Newport Bermuda Race is not a race for novices!” The course crosses the rough Gulf Stream and is mostly out of the range of rescue helicopters, and Bermuda is guarded by a dangerous reef. The race is nicknamed “the thrash to the Onion Patch” because most Bermuda Races include high winds and big waves (a combination sailors call “a hard thrash”), and because Bermuda is an agricultural island (notably in its old days for onions!).

    The race demands good seamanship, great care, and a boat that is both well-built and properly equipped. The boats must meet stringent equipment requirements and undergo inspection, and the sailors must also pass a review and undergo training in safety. The bonds formed by these sailors are strong. Numerous sailors have sailed more than 10 races, often with family and friends.

    It is no wonder that over the past 30+ years that more and more Bermuda racers have put their faith and trust in high-quality, offshore performance sailboats produced by the J/Design team that are easy to sail in any weather conditions- from sybaritic to stormy as hell.  In virtually every major offshore race around the world, J/Teams have prevailed in some of the nastiest conditions imaginable, and sailed home safely to win class or overall trophies.  And, remarkably, many of them have repeated those winning performances over the course of time on their J/Boats.

    In this year’s 51st Bermuda Race, there are 29 J/crews ready to take on the challenges of the Gulf Stream meanders and rocky approaches to Bermuda.  Not for the faint of heart, but the famous reception for all the crews at Royal Bermuda YC is well worth it!

    ST DAVIDS LIGHTHOUSE DIVISION- only Class I helmsmen
    In by far the largest division of the race, the St David’s Lighthouse Division, there are 109 entries of which 26 are J/Boats- nearly one-quarter of the entire field and easily the largest brand represented by a factor of 2.5!

    SDL Class 5 includes two J/42s (Roger Gatewood’s SHAZAAM & Eliot Merrill’s FINESSE), Bill Passano’s J/37 CARINA, and Fred Allardyce’s J/40 MISTY.

    The sole J/crew in SDL Class 6 is the brand new J/121 JACKHAMMER sailed by the United Kingdom’s Andrew Hall.  See the “Bermuda Spotlight” on Andrew’s program below.

    The fourteen-boat SDL Class 7 might as well have been labeled the Fast 40’s J/Boat Division.  Four J/122s are sailing, including the 2016 Annapolis Newport winner- Paul Milo’s ORION. Other 122s include Dan Heun’s MOXIEE, Chris Stanmore-Major’s SUMMER GRACE, and Dave Cielusniak’s J-CURVE.  In addition, there are five J/120s, including past Bermuda winner- Richard Born’s WINDBORN. Other 120s include John Harvey & Rick Titsworth’s SLEEPING TIGER, Stu McCrea’s DEVIATION, Rick Oricchio’s ROCKET SCIENCE, Bob Manchester’s VAMOOSE and Brian Spears’ MADISON.

    SDL Class 8 has Dale & Mike McIvor’s J/133 MATADOR and twin J/44s only this year (Chris Lewis’ KENAI & Len Sitar’s VAMP).

    SDL Class 9 has two of the new J/121 offshore speedsters- Joe & Mike Brito’s INCOGNITO and David Southwell’s ALCHEMY.  In addition, there will be Brian Prinz’s offshore machine, the J/125 SPECTRE and Jon Burt’s J/130 LOLA.

    FINISTERRE DIVISION- the “cruising division”- only one main, one jib, one spinnaker fixed on centerline permitted and only Class I helmsmen.

    Sailing in the Finisterre Class 12 division is Joe Murli’s J/44 SIRENA BELLA and Charles Willauer and family on board their J/46 BREEZING UP. Class 13 division has Howie Hodgson’s lovely J/160 TRUE.

    GIBBS HILL DIVISION- water ballast, canting keels permitted, helmsmen either Class I or III.
    In the Gibbs Hill Class 14 division is Leonid Vasiliev’s J/120 DESPERADO and another new J/121- Don Nicholson’s APOLLO.

    DOUBLEHANDED DIVISION
    Finally, sailing in the Doublehanded Class 3 division will be Gardner Grant’s Bermuda Race-winning J/120 ALIBI and Steve Berlack’s J/42 ARROWHEAD (another past Bermuda Race winner).

    Newport Bermuda Spotlight
    Andrew Hall’s hot new J/121 JACKHAMMER has been preparing the entire spring for the NBR.  Chris Museler, New York Times sailing columnist, had a chance to catch up to him recently.  Here is that interview:

    It seems odd that Andrew Hall decided not to install the water-ballast tanks offered in his brand new J/121 JACKHAMMER. This turbo-boost feature will be used by two of the four 121’s competing in this year’s Newport Bermuda Race. They are the latest offshore 40 footers, with furling, carbon reaching sails, plumb bows and a sleek cabin that mimics today’s high performance Superyacht.

    JACKHAMMER will join ALCHEMY (also not using water ballast), in the St. David’s Lighthouse Division, while the other two J/121s, APOLLO and INCOGNITO, will be racing in the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division where water ballast is allowed, along with canting keel boats and no limits on professional crews.

    “It’s mainly because we’re penalized under the handicap so much for the water ballast,” explains Hall, who has been training with his mostly British crew throughout April out of his summer home in Jamestown, Rhode Island. “We also couldn’t race in the amateur division with ballast. And without the tanks, it makes the boat more roomy down below, and can sleep more people.”

    The sail profiles between all the J/121s are identical, says Hall, who has sailed four Bermuda Races, some on his last boat, the J/133 JACKKNIFE. He races a J/125 in the RORC summer offshore series in the UK and he’s looking forward to testing out the new boat on an ocean course.

    “The J/125 goes like a bat out of hell, but has a poor handicap,” says Hall. “Hopefully the 121 will be competitive and a lot more comfortable. The 125 is decidedly not comfortable and decidedly wet.”

    The water-ballasted J/121s rate faster than JACKHAMMER, and though the ballast adds righting moment and power, there are times when it’s not needed. Hall says that he hasn’t lined up against another 121 to discover if, under handicap, one will win over the other. He does say there are benefits to using water ballast besides strict performance.

    “They’re [ballast tanks] there for sailing with less people,” says Hall. “That’s quite nice, particularly for sailing doublehanded.”

    The J/121 has a sailplan well-suited to close reaching angles, often a Newport Bermuda Race point of sail.

    Hall, a Brit, will be sailing with his son and a mixture of Americans and fellow countrymen. The crew was bending on storm sails in the sub-freezing mornings of April, with numb fingers pushing dog bones through the loops of the storm jib’s soft hanks. JACKHAMMER was soon seen ripping across Narragansett Bay in fresh northwesterlies testing sail combinations and tweaking electronics.

    Though the Bermuda Race will be a great test of this new, high performance design, Hall and his crew consider it just a stop on a regular calendar of fantastic ocean races.

    After Bermuda, JACKHAMMER will be shipped to Italy and then brought down to Malta for the Middle Sea Race. In 2019, it’s the RORC offshore series and, possibly, the Fastnet Race. Then another crack at Bermuda in 2020.

    “I look forward to this race,” says Hall. “We will have covered a few miles by the time we get back here in two year’s time.”  Thanks for this contribution from New York Times reporter- Chris Museler.  For more Newport to Bermuda Race sailing information
     


    Italian Open J/70 Nationals Announcement
    (Malcesine (Lake Garda), Italy)- From July 12th to 15th, the Italian Open J/70 Championship will be taking place at Malcesine, a pretty waterfront town on the western shore of Lago di Garda. It is the perfect opportunity to test the waters of the race course for the 2019 Europeans, that will also be in Malcesine.

    Registrations close on June 25th and the event will consist of four days of racing.

    Following this week’s J/70 Europeans taking place in Vigo, Spain, it is expected a significant portion of that fleet will then pack up their boats and head to Italy’s most famous sailing lake, a.k.a. “the wind machine” on Lago di Garda.

    One of those expert crews attending may be a three-time J/70 World Champion crew- Willem van Waay.  Here is an interview between Silvia Gallegati, the Italian J/70 Class communications director, with Willem. The main focus of the interview is on the J/70 and he says some very important “secrets” on the rigging and tuning of the boat that may be useful to all J/70 crews.

    https://www.facebook.com/Zerogradinord/videos/2247823425235687

    For more information about the Italian Open J/70 Nationals, please don’t hesitate to contact- Silvia Gallegati- E: silvia.gallegati@gmail.com / M: +39 347.3450040
     

    Kieler Woche Regatta Preview
    (Kiel, Germany)- The 136th edition of Kieler Woche (Kiel Week) will be taking place from June 16th to the 24th and participating will be 1,500+ sailboats and over 5,000 sailors for the week long event.  Considered one of the world’s largest sailing events, Kiel Week is hosted by several clubs, with Kieler YC as the principal host.

    Even in its 136th year, Kieler Woche still plays a virtuoso performance on the keyboard of festivity: Kieler Woche is the largest summer festival in Northern Europe.

    During the week, more than three million visitors from all over the world will be diving into the colorful and multi-facetted life of Kieler Woche.  Around 2,000 events in areas of culture, sailing, summer festival, entertainment, science, politics, industry and sport come together to form a maritime symphony. Visitors are promised nine days of high spirits in the far North.

    Three J/fleets are participating as one-design sailboat classes, including J/70s, J/80s and J/24s.

    There is a huge turnout for the J/70 class, with 48 boats registered, ready to do battle on the Baltic Sea.  The growing participation in the German J/70 class can be directly attributable to the evolution of the Deutsche J/70 Segel-Bundesliga; it has over fifty-five sailing clubs and thousands of sailors engaged as team/club members sailing the highly popular J/70s on Germany’s vast array of lakes. In this year’s event, three nations are represented (Germany, Denmark, France).  Notable German teams include Bjorn Belken’s PROCEDES DIVA, Gerd Knospe’s SANNA R, Frank Schonfeldt’s DER GERAT, Karsten Witte’s J-WD, Michael Grau’s PAINT IT BLACK, and Tobias Feuerherdt’s ONKEL HANNE.  The Danish crew on Soren Larsen’s CRACKER JACK and the French crew on Christoph Cornelius’ FRA 23 will be hoping to crack the top of the leaderboard.

    The nineteen-boat J/80 class will see a cross-section of German, Dutch, and Danish teams.  Leading the Germans will be past Kieler Woche winner, Martin Menzner on PIKE.  Other top German crews hoping to be on that leaderboard include Andreas Rose’ TRUE GRIT, Hauke Kruss’ TAK FOR TUREN, Max Gebhard’s MARAMA, and Torsten Voss’ FRIDA.

    With an array of World and European Champions in the mix, the twenty-nine-boat J/24 class looks to have formidable competition.  Leading that charge from the USA is Mike Ingham’s NAUTALYTICS, a past J/24 World Champion.  The top British crew is Ian Southworth’s IL RICCIO, another World and European J/24 Champion. Then Swedish National Champion, Per-Hakan Persson will be racing FRONT RUNNER.

    The leading German crews should include Daniel Frost’s JJONE, Fabian Damm’s HUNGRIGER WOLF, Frank Schonfeldt’s HENK, Manfred Konig’s VITESSE, and Stefan Karsunke’s GER 5381.

    In the ORC Offshore Divisions, it will be interesting to follow the progress of Hinnerk Blenckner’s J/105 JALAPENO, Hauke Moje’s J/97 QUIRON, Frank Stahl’s J/97 MORENA, and Christian Tinnemeier’s J/125 NEEDLES & PINS.  For any Kieler Woche results  For more Kieler Woche sailing information
     

    Women’s SAILING Champions League Preview
    (Kiel, Germany)- The Women’s SAILING Champions League is about to begin with the first all-women’s regatta this weekend at the start of Kieler Woche– a.k.a. Kiel Week, the biggest sailing regatta in the world. This event is the latest innovation to be launched out of the successful SAILING Champions League format. Taking place from June 16th to 18th, this innovative regatta presented by Audi has attracted prestigious yacht clubs from Denmark, Finland, Germany, Lithuania, Netherlands, Sweden and Switzerland.

    It is fair to say that the Danes from Royal Danish YC (KDY) are fielding one of the strongest and most experienced crews for Kieler Woche.  At the helm is Danish Olympic representative Henriette Koch, crewed by a team that has raced together when they won the 2015 Women’s Match Racing World Championship, including Tina Schmidt Gramkov who also sailed for Denmark in the match-racing event at London 2012.

    Less than two weeks ago, at the first semifinal of the SAILING Champions League in Porto Cervo, the only all-women crew among the 22 international entries was winning heats against the men.  In fact, they were leading the entire regatta after the first day! In the end, they finished 5th, an astounding achievement against 21 other top crews from Europe’s best sailing clubs. As a result, KDY has qualified to compete in the final of the SAILING Champions League at St Moritz later this summer.

    In Kiel, each team will compete with a four to five-person crew. The event will be sailed in a fleet of matched one-design J/70 sailboats and the racing area will be Kiel Bay in the Baltic Sea.

    Laura Fischer, who will be at the helm for German club Deutscher Touring Yacht Club, commented: “We are happy to be part of the first-ever Women’s SAILING Champions League. We have put together a young, but at the same time, very experienced team. We are excited to be competing against the other female crews from other European clubs and we are looking forward to some exciting races in Kiel.”

    The first Women’s SAILING Champions League event is organized by SAILING Champions League GmbH and the International Sailing League Association (ISLA). Nynne Desirée Ammundsen, General Secretary from ISLA, said: “From an ISLA point of view, what we see with Women’s SAILING Champions League is all that we could ever wish for. Gathering and developing a strong league concept while developing the dynamics of league sailing is the founding mission of ISLA. In addition, promoting this mission for women- an important target for ISLA- is an extra bonus. It is therefore a true pleasure to provide a platform and experience for women sailors.”

    Livestream and results:
    To follow all the action online, tune into the livestream for the Saturday and Monday of racing. This will be available on Facebook, YouTube and also on the SAILING Champions League website (http://www.sailing-championsleague.com).

    SAP Sailing Analytics provides 24/7 additional statistics and data for sailors, fans, spectators and media like GPS tracking, real-time analysis, and live leaderboard combined with 2D visualization. You can find all results on SAPsailing.com (http://wwww.sapsailing.com)!

    The clubs competing in Women’s SAILING Champions League from each country are: Denmark (Kongelig Dansk Yachtklub, Copenhagen/ Hellerup Sejlklub, Hellerup), Finland (Nyländska Jaktklubben, Helsinki), Germany (Deutscher Touring Yacht-Club, Tutzing (near Munich)/ Norddeutscher Regatta Verein, Hamburg), Lithuania (GVK Team, Vilnius), Netherlands (International Yacht Club Amsterdam, Amsterdam), Sweden (Malmö Segelsällskap, Malmö), Switzerland (Zürcher Segel Club, Zurich).   Watch the J/70 Women’s SAILING Champions League trailer here   For more Women’s SAILING Champions League sailing information
     

    Cleveland Race Week Preview
    (Cleveland, OH)- The highly-popular Cleveland Race Week starts this coming weekend on the waters of Lake Erie, hosted by the Edgewater Yacht Club for both one-design and offshore yachts.  The event has three components to satisfy the desires of all the passionate sailors in the region.  Starting June 15th to 17th is the One-Design program for twenty-four J/Teams on J/22s, J/70s, and J/105s.  Then, on June 20th- Wednesday- there will be Women’s & Doublehanded racing for one day.  After that is the Offshore Regatta from June 23rd to 24th, with seventeen J’s racing in yet more J/105 One-designs as was as a PHRF fleet that includes J/24s up to J/111s.

    The six-boat J/22 class features Mike Meaney’s MEANIAC and Chris Princing’s EVIL DR. PORK CHOP/ AWARD & SPORTS Team.

    The eleven-boat J/70 fleet has several well-known veteran traveling teams, including Trey Sheehan’s infamous HOOLIGAN: FLAT STANLEY RACING, Tod Sackett’s FM, Lee Sackett & Dave Kerr’s USA 364, and Ted Pinkerton’s LITTLE SIDE HUSTLE.

    The seven-boat J/105 class has Ron Carson’s DARK’N’STORMY, Tom & Cindy Einhouse’s OVATION, Ron Hollingsworth’s SLINGSHOT, and the Uhlir Brother’s TRIO.

    For the Women’s event, Katie Langolf’s J/34 IOR will be racing against Lucinda Einhouse’s J/105 OVATION for class honors.

    The Offshore PHRF Spinnaker class will be gigantic, with twenty-eight boats on the starting line.  Amongst them will be fourteen J/Teams.  Those crews include the J/111’s (Rob Ruhlman’s SPACEMAN SPIFF & Don Hudak’s CAPERS), Tim Yanda’s J/120 VIVA LA VIDA, Chris Mallets’ J/109 SYNCHRONICITY, Hugh Scott Seaholm’s J/88 PAPA’s TOY, two J/34s (Brett & Katie Langolf’s KNEE DEEP & Dave Krotseng’s BONAFIDE), Mark Saffell’s J/36 PAINKILLER, two J/105s (Uhlir Brothers’ TRIO & Ron Carson’s DARK’N’STORMY), Rich & Dolores Galaska’s BREEZIN, and Mike Vining’s J/24 REALLY BAD GIRLFRIEND.  For more Cleveland Race Week sailing information
     

    Block Island Race Week Preview
    (Block Island, RI)- The Duck Island Yacht Club in Westbrook, Connecticut and the Block Island Yacht Club have teamed up to co-host Block Island Race Week 2018. The event will feature five days of racing (2 per day) on Block Island Sound June 17th to the 22nd.

    In a “Bermuda Race” year, the event has always been much more laid back with a smaller fleet of boats.  Nevertheless, the camaraderie is proportionately greater as everyone seems to know everyone sailing in the regatta.  That quaintness, in fact, serves as its appeal for many sailors that simply want a relaxing “sailing vacation.”

    A number of J/crews have answered that call of competitive, but laid-back random leg races, not all that windward-leeward, rest, rinse, repeat, again and again in monotonous fashion kind of stuff.  This year’s DIYC and BIYC PRO’s have promised to make it fun, easy, and not too many sets and takedowns each day!  In the PHRF Spinnaker division, a total of eight boats are sailing, half of it J/teams.  Three J/111s are racing; Sedge & Andy Ward’s BRAVO, Greg Slamowitz’s MANITOU, and Kenn Fischburg’s WILD CHILD.  Joining them is a very fast J/29, John Hammel’s appropriately named SLEEPER from Noroton YC. Sailing in the PHRF Non-Spin Class is Peter Hilgendorff’s J/29 MEDDLER. Should be fun!  For more Block Island Race Week sailing information
     

    Three Buoys Fiasco Race Preview
    (Seattle, WA)- The notoriously fun-loving Sloop Tavern YC in Seattle, WA is hosting is newly famous “Three Buoys Fiasco” race.  Like the San Francisco Bay brothers down south that pioneered the Three Bridge Fiasco, the masterminds in the Pacific Northwest thought that sounded like a great idea.  So, in an ode to the SF Bay friends, the race is devised in a similar, devious fashion- three marks are determined prior to the day’s race based on wind & weather conditions, then once you start, you can choose to round them anyway you want, so long as you go around all three!

    Loving the organized chaos will be seven J/Crews from across the region.  Two J/105s are going for it (Jeremy Boynes’ AVALANCHE & Jim Geros’ LAST TANGO), two J/80s are in the mix (Alan’s’ STELLAR J & Lek Dimarucot’s UNDERDOG), Bill Daniel’s J/100 TOURIST will be there, so will be Ulf Georg Gwildis’ J/30 IMPULSIVE and Leo Morales’ beautifully restored J/27 WIZARD.  For more Three Buoy Fiasco sailing information
     

    J/46 Rendezvous @ Camden Classics Cup- It’s official!
    (Camden, Maine)- There will be a J/46 One-Design Class at the Lyman Morse Camden Classics Cup July 26th to 28th, 2018.

    Four J/46s are already entered in this fun and well-run event that will surpass 50 entries. Besides an owner’s forum Thursday afternoon during registration, there will be J/46 One-Design races on Friday and Saturday and great parties both nights.

    So that no one has to get out of cruising trim for the event, here are the rules:
    • Appropriate anchor and chain in place on the bow
    • Dodger up
    • Jib maximum is 100%, no genoas
    • No spinnakers
    • Autopilots, electric winches, and whisker poles permitted
    • Single-handed, double-handed or a whole gang of crew, all good
    • Deep-draft boats will carry a PHRF handicap relative to the shoal-draft boats per Rod Johnstone’s recommendation.
    To register go to camdenclassicscup.org or regattaman.com. For more information, contact Tom Babbitt at bravoj42@gmail.com or cell: 207 632 1262.
     

    J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    As the world approaches the “summer solstice” of June 21st in the northern hemisphere, and thus the “winter solstice” in the southern hemisphere, there is no question who has the better deal.  Is it ever a wonder why our South American, Ozzie & Kiwi brothers and sisters have an enormous sailing advantage over their “frozen” family to the north of the Equator?  Simple math.  Doh! Those “down under” enjoy a nine-month summer while their friends up north of the border have around a 3-5 month sailing window.  Doesn’t seem fair, does it?  Just plain facts.  Perhaps, the accelerating magnetic North Pole to the ESE, means summer sailing in Arctic waters, and summer cruises in J/24s across the Northwest Passage??  Perhaps. That could definitely help northern hemisphere sailors as the world warms up! However, whatever is happening, it’s producing rather weird weather everywhere!

    On the North American side of things, the Chicago NOOD event is one of the biggest on the Helly Hansen Sailing World NOOD Regatta circuit.  This event included one-design classes for J/70s, J/105s, J/109s, J/111s, and J/88s. In addition, there was the North Sails Rally with ORR/PHRF divisions for a J/100, J/105, J/120, J/130, J/133, J/112E, and J/44. Of the 144 keelboats registered, 58 were J/Crews (40% of the fleet).

    The biennial Annapolis to Bermuda race, a 735nm race hosted by the Eastport YC and the Royal Hamilton Amateur Dinghy Club in Bermuda, is the longest ocean race on the USA east coast. Again, this year it delivered a unique combination of inshore and offshore racing through its route down the Chesapeake Bay (starting in Annapolis, MD), across the Gulf Stream, and onto Bermuda.

    For the NYYC Annual Regatta, it was the 164th edition that offered buoy or navigator-course racing for one-designs and yachts sailing under IRC, ORR, CRF and PHRF handicap over the June 9th and 10th weekend. Then, down in the Chesapeake Bay, the Annapolis Leukemia Cup Regatta took place in Annapolis, MD, hosted by the Eastport and Annapolis YC for PHRF and one-designs of J/30s, J/35s, J/80s, and J/105s.

    Over on the European side of the world, it was incredibly busy all over the continent. For starters, the J/70 Europeans have been taking place for sixty-nine teams from fifteen countries, hosted by the Real Club Náutico de Vigo. At the same time, the Royal Ocean Racing Club has been hosting a stellar fleet of thirty-three offshore IRC racing teams from nine countries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Great Britain, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Turkey, USA) at their Cowes, Isle of Wight station for the 2018 IRC European Championship, a J/112E and J/109 are both doing well.

    Up north in Sweden, the inaugural Midsummer Challenge starting in Stockholm challenged offshore keelboat solo sailors for a 125nm race through the Bohuslän- Swedish archipelago. Then, in the sailing league world, the Dutch held their second event in Roermond, The Netherlands for 15 teams.  The German J/70 Sailing League held their first event at Tutzing, Germany on Lake Starnberg for 18 clubs. Then, on a famous lake known to thousands of European sailors, the Italian J/24 Championship took place at Riva del Garda, Italy- hosted by Fraglia Vela Riva del Garda.

    Meanwhile, our friendly and lovable “convicts” down under in Australia enjoyed their 30th-plus Australian J/24 Midwinters at the incredibly hospitable and accommodating hosts at the Cronulla Sailing Club, off Sydney Harbour.

    Read on! The J/Community and Cruising section below has many entertaining stories and news about J/Sailors as well as cruising blogs about those who continue to enjoy the Caribbean and the South Pacific, staying warm while others are trying to stay warm up north.  Check them out!  More importantly, if you have more J/Regatta News, please email it or  upload onto our J/Boats Facebook pag  Below are the summaries.

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Jun 15- Newport to Bermuda Race- Newport, RI
    Jun 16-24- Kiel Week/ Kieler Woche- Kiel, Germany
    Jun 16-18- Women’s SAILING Champions League- Kiel, Germany
    Jun 16-17- Three Buoy Fiasco- Seattle, WA
    Jun 17-22- Block Island Race Week- Block Island, RI
    Jun 20-23- J/22 North American Championship- Wayzata, MN
    Jun 22-24- J/FEST Seattle- Seattle, WA
    Jun 22- RORC Morgan Cup Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    Jun 22-24- Long Beach Race Week- Long Beach, CA
    Jun 23-25- J/70 EURO CUP V- Riva del Garda, Italy
    Jun 28- Jul 1- Norwegian J/70 National Championship- Hanko, Norway
    Jun 29- Jul 1- New York YC One-Design Regatta- Newport, RI
    Jun 30- Vic-Maui International Yacht Race- Victoria, BC, Canada
    Jul 7-14- J/80 World Championship- Les Sables d’Olonne, France
    Jul 7- Round the Island Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    Jul 7-8- Sail Newport Regatta- Newport, RI

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

    J/70 Europeans Update
    (Vigo, Spain)- Sixty-nine teams from fifteen countries have been sailing the 2018 J/70 Class Open European Championship and 2018 J/70 Corinthian Class European Championship. Organized by the Real Club Náutico de Vigo in conjunction with the International J/70 Class Association, and J/70 Spanish Class Association.

    Thirteen races were scheduled over five days, racing in the stunning Ria de Vigo on the Atlantic coast of Northwest Spain. The Real Club Náutico de Vigo has provided a warm welcome to competitors with social occasions throughout the regatta.  So far, the sailing has been stunning.  Here are the up-to-date race reports.

    Day One- Tuesday- Sparkling Start in Vigo
    The first day was blessed with sparkling conditions in Ria de Vigo. A brisk northerly breeze piped up to 18 knots with a meter sea state providing thrilling downwind conditions. Highly competitive starts, with solid traffic at mark roundings, made for high octane racing of the highest caliber. Three races were held for the 69-boat fleet, with three different winners. Krzysztof Krempec's EWA (POL), Alberto Rossi's ENFANT TERRIBLE (ITA), and Paolo Tomsic's SOCIETA NAUTICA GRIGNANO (ITA). Luis Bugallo's MARNATURA (ESP), representing the Real Club Náutico de Vigo, was the top Corinthian J/70.

    Peter Duncan's RELATIVE OBSCURITY (USA) came back from a bad start in the last race to get up to fourth, which really made the difference, the reigning J/70 World Champion was a happy man after his first taste of action in Vigo.

    “It was gorgeous sailing out there today, a beautiful body of water, very exciting with 69 boats on the start line. The race committee did a good job, which is not easy with that many boats. I have always thought that Europeans sail J/70s well, and they showed that today. It was really close, if you made a mistake, you paid for it,” said Peter Duncan.

    Alberto Rossi's ENFANT TERRIBLE (ITA) scored a 3-1-11 to finish the day in second place. The former Farr 40 and TP52 World Champion was full of praise for the J/70 Class.

    “It was tough racing today, the level continues to increase in the class, with the top 30 boats all capable of winning races. Even with a split start line, a lot of boats tend to go for the favored side, and if you don't get a good start and hold your lane, you can easily end up with a bad result. We did make a few mistakes, but we are happy with our results,” commented Alberto Rossi.

    Krzysztof Krempec's EWA (POL) had a great day, winning the first race and scoring top ten results to finish Day One in third position. Krempec's team has only been racing in the class for the last 18 months.

    “I am very pleased, we had three good races with excellent wind and it was really good fun. The level in the regatta is very high with a lot of boats together, which means it is not easy; you are constantly fighting with different boats. Our success today was not down to one thing, it was important to sail consistently, even though two of our starts were not good, we concentrated on our position and boat speed, and they were the keys to success,” observed Krzysztof Krempec.

    The top Spanish team was Jose María Torcida's NOTICIA (ESP) scoring a 9-2-9 to place fourth after three races. Noticia was runner up for the 2017 European Championships.

    “The conditions today have been great and it seems we are going to have more windy days during the week. Racing in a fleet of 69 boats is always tricky, especially at the starts, which will always be really tight. With a clear favourite side of the course, the starts were really complicated,” said Jose María Torcida.

    After racing, over 300 competitors enjoyed local delicacies including traditional Galician tapas and refreshments at the Race Village. In the grounds of the Real Club de Vigo live music from Vigo cover band Penny Lane Syndrome created a perfect atmosphere.

    Day Two- Wednesday- Full-On Conditions
    Thrilling racing took place on the second day in the Ria de Vigo. The wind speed topped out at over 20 knots for much of the day, providing awesome downwind planing conditions for the fleet.  Three races were held, with a discard kicking in on the last race of the day.

    Peter Duncan's RELATIVE OBSCURITY (USA) scored two bullets to lead the fleet after six races. Relative Obscurity's trimmer Willem van Waay commented, “Those are the days that keep you wanting to race these boats, it was gorgeous out there today.”   Audio Interview with Willem van Waay

    Alberto Rossi's ENFANT TERRIBLE (ITA) put in another great performance winning Race 4 to keep the pressure on the leader, just two points behind. Paolo Tomsic's Società Nautica Grignano (ITA) had another great day scoring a 5-10-2, putting the Corinthian team from Lake Garda into third place overall and top of the Corinthian Division.

    Paolo Tomsic was quick to give praise to his team for their impressive performance. “We are so very happy with this unexpected result, we are very honored to be in Vigo, this is a beautiful location where we feel very comfortable. We hope our performance will be consistent in the next few days. We are used to big winds, being based on Lake Garda , but there you never find waves as big as this! Our team is Giuliano Chiandrussi, Emanuele Noè; Francesca Pagan, and above all our owner, Mauro Brescacin,” said Paolo Tomsic

    Umberto de Luca's ENJOY (ITA) is in fourth place after six races. The 26 year-old from Yachting Club Torri on Lake Garda started sailing in the class last year after competing in the Laser and Finn Classes.

    “There was strong wind today and very choppy seas with some good waves so it was a lot of fun, especially downwind. The results are coming because we are getting everything together but the most important thing is that we are very fast, especially upwind, which has got us out of some tricky situations, and the tactician is making some really good calls. It is an honor to sail against these big guys in the sailing world, and exciting for us to do so well,” commented Umberto de Luca.

    CALYPSO (MLT), co-skippered by Jonathan Calascione & Seb Ripard, started the day well with a second place but lost a batten in the pre-start for Race 5 forcing the team to retire. Calypso was back out for Race 6, scoring a 10th place, keeping the Maltese team in the top five.

    Luis Bugallo's MARNATURA (ESP) had a great day, fully pulling the trigger downwind; scoring three top-ten results to finish the day in sixth place overall, and second place in the Corinthian Class.

    “Yesterday we decided to be conservatives and not take too much risks. However, today we planned the opposite and it worked. We are happy with our day,” said Luis Bugallo's MARNATURA from Real Club Náutico de Vigo is the top performing Spanish boat after six races.

    After racing, competitors enjoyed the facilities of the purpose built Regatta Village at the Real Club de Vigo with live music from Vigo's Diego Pacheco and Tonechi. An official dinner was held at the Noble Hall at the Real Club Náutico de Vigo, honored guests included representatives of each country present at the J/70 European Championships.

    Day Three- Thursday- Red Hot Sailing!
    After two days of fast exhilarating sailing, the pace changed with lighter conditions in the Ria de Vigo, but the intensity of the brilliant sunshine and the competition was still red hot. After two General Recalls in Race 8, the Black Flag was hoisted and 13 teams were disqualified in the restart. Championship leader, Peter Duncan's RELATIVE OBSCURITY (USA) managed to stay out of trouble but only just. The J/70 World Champions scored a win in Race 8, but came 24th in Race 9, after getting caught in traffic upwind. Duncan's team still has a firm grip on the top of the leaderboard, but with four more races scheduled, there is plenty more action to come.

    “I have known Willem (van Waay) for a long time, but getting into to high level racing as part of this team has been a lot of fun. It's super entertaining ashore and that holds true on the water. The program is very well run, but it is also very enjoyable, and I am ready to ride with this team as far as it goes” said Max Hutcheson, bowman on Duncan’s team.

    26 year-old, Umberto Luca's ENJOY (ITA) is going from strength to strength, after breaking into the top three yesterday, the team from Lake Garda scored a 10-2-12 today to move up to second place. Alberto Rossi's ENFANT TERRIBLE (ITA) was black-flagged in Race 8, slipping to third overall just a point behind Enjoy.

    Jose María Torcida's NOTICIA (ESP) had their best day of the regatta scoring 4-9-2 taking the team into fourth place and the best team from the host nation. All-in-all it was a good day for Spanish teams; Gustavo Doreste's FERMAX (ESP) won the last race of the day to move into the top ten. In the Corinthian Division, Luis Bugallo's MARNATURA (ESP) scored a 5-7-14 to take the lead by four points from Paolo Tomsic's SOCIETA NAUTICA GRIGNANO (ITA).

    “We still have four races to go, we are happy and we aspire to really do well in all of them. Duncan had a bad result already today so he knows he must be conservative. The spirit of our team is really high and this regatta is like a marathon: It is about not having a bad result and today we have sailed well,” commented top Spanish sailor Jose María Torcida.

    CALYPSO (MLT) co-skippered by Jonathan Calascione & Seb Ripard, started the day winning Race 7 but the Maltese team was black flagged in Race 8 and scored a 41st in the last race of the day.

    “It was really great to win a race in this fleet, and prove that yesterday's second was no fluke. For Race 8, we were probably one second early, and when you hear your sail number called out, and you already have a DNF from the previous day, it would have been easy to let our heads drop. But, we came here to compete and improve and we will be racing as competitively as we can until the last race,” said skipper Seb Ripard.

    Some of the world's most accomplished sailors are taking part in the J/70 European Championships. World Champions from every aspect of the sport, Olympic Medallist, America's Cup and Volvo Ocean Race sailors. However, some are just at the beginning of the journey. Remi Piazza's MISTRAL (MON) is the youngest team at the championships, the four sailors are just 15-18 years of age, and proudly representing the Yacht Club de Monaco. The club started a youth sailing program in 1970, and today it has 350 members, from as young as six years old. 18 year-old Alba Malivindi is driving MISTRAL.

    “This is our first international regatta as a team, and we have only been sailing together for less than a year. We are enjoying the event and it is a really good experience for us, because the level is really high,” commented Alba Malivindi.

    A J/70 European Championship preview can be viewed here on Facebook  Follow and share the J/70 Europeans here on Facebook   For more J/70 European Championship sailing information
     

    IRC European Championship Update
    J/112E J-LANCE 12 Leading
    (Cowes, England)- The Royal Ocean Racing Club has been hosting a stellar fleet of thirty-three offshore IRC racing teams from nine countries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Great Britain, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Turkey, USA) at their Cowes, Isle of Wight station for the 2018 IRC European Championship.  So far, the event has been a great “test” event for many of Europe’s top offshore teams that are planning to sail in the IRC/ ORC World Championship that will be taking place in The Hague, The Netherlands in a few weeks time.

    The hot twelve-boat IRC 3 Class includes two J/Crews; Fred Bouvier’s stellar French crew on the J/112E J-LANCE 12 and the local British team on John Smart’s J/109 JUKEBOX.  So far, J-LANCE 12 has proven to be a consistent winner, currently leading their class after five days of racing on the Solent and the classic Round Island Race (the famous 60nm original America’s Cup course around the Isle of Wight).

    Day One- Sunday
    With such a light forecast, the Royal Ocean Racing Club's on-the-water officials, led by PRO Stuart Childerley, did well to complete one race on the opening day. Unfortunately the 5-7 knot north-northeasterly wind, all but disappeared just prior to the final IRC Two and Three boats finishing. After sending the fleet back to port, the PRO called it a day just before 1500 BST.

    The cunning Danes saw off some of the top IRC Three competition when they locked out several boats the wrong side of the committee boat at the start. That included the hot French team on the J/112E J-LANCE 12, skippered by J Composites boss Didier Le Moal. Hansen was one of the first to tack after the start and benefitted from being able to lee-bow the tide, like other boats that ventured right.

    They closed on the back end of IRC Two at the leeward gate and then tacked to the right again, where the lee-bow effect was less with the flood tide subsiding. Lady luck continued to smile on J LANCE 12, finishing just before the breeze started properly shutting down - the French J/112E stages a remarkable recovery after their second tier start.

    Day Two- Monday
    The Azores high pressure system encroaching on the UK is bringing summer to the Solent, but making life awkward for the race officers.

    Today's much-anticipated race around the Isle of Wight got away on time at 0930 BST from the Royal Yacht Squadron line. But, just under two hours later the wind died and the race was abandoned, although not before several competitors had kedged.

    With the boats returned to Cowes Yacht Haven, patience won out and the gradient breeze from the ENE somehow managed to overcome the thermal. This allowed for two round the cans races to be held in the central Solent, the wind even creeping into the teens towards the end of the second race. The two inshore races were held near the Brambles Bank with reaching and running starts respectively.

    In IRC Three, J/112E J-LANCE 12 skippered by France's Didier Le Moal, scored a 2-4.  Skipper Le Moal admitted, “we are not used to downwind starts." Le Moal's crew, which includes reigning Solitaire du Figaro champion and Volvo Ocean Race navigator Nicolas Lunven, has sailed together for many years. And, in fact, Le Moal remembers sailing the first RORC Commodores' Cup back in 1992 with a French team.

    Day Three- Tuesday
    Light winds and strong tides may have made for a difficult first half of the regatta, but Hampshire Tourist Board conditions graced the Solent. With a southwesterly wind that peaked at around 15 knots countering a powerful ebb tide, PRO Stuart Childerley set a 'classic Cowes Week' course, with around the cans courses set for the westerly breezes in the central and western Solent, with a finish for all three classes off The Green in Cowes.

    As a result, there was an ultra-challenging start with two-knot spring tides pushing the boats across the line. As one person described it, “it was the type of start where if you got it wrong you were going home, not something you would ever want to attempt again."

    The two horse race in IRC Three was in danger of becoming a three horse one, with the X-37 Hansen having a difficult day, scoring a 12th, despite a worthy effort at a port tack start. This result the Danish team has immediately thrown now that the first discards have come into play. Meanwhile IRC Three had another winner today in the French First 40.7 Pen Koent of Emmanuel Le Men and his crew from Val-André in northern Brittany.

    "We had a very good start- the type of start you do once every 10 years," mused Le Men. "We tacked very quickly at the buoy and on the first run we were first and after that we were with J-LANCE 12 and Shaitan, changing places. On the last run, we were still with J-LANCE 12, but she gives us some time with her rating. Our boat is quite old; it is good for windward-leewards in not too much wind. The new boats go quicker in waves and heavy wind."

    J-LANCE 12 had managed to edge in front at the Hampstead Ledge weather mark and finished second overall, and continues to lead IRC Three by two points from the X-37 Hansen. Racing on board Le Moal's J/112E is reigning Solitaire du Figaro champion and Volvo Ocean Race navigator Nicolas Lunven.

    "Today was a perfectly typical race in the Solent with 12-15 knots, strong tide, wonderful weather, beautiful green waterfront views,” said Lunven. "The wind was against the tide, but the sea state was quite nice I was expecting more choppy waves. It was the first race of the Championship with more than 8 knots of wind! It was a very nice race."

    Day Four- Wednesday
    A third light, tricky day with strong tides saw a lengthy round-the-cans course in the central Solent just completed before the wind shut down. After a wait, the skies darkened, the temperature plummeted as a southeasterly wind filled in, lasting just long enough for a singleton windward-leeward to be held for the three classes.

    A powerful flood tide off Osborne Bay, pushing boats down towards the pin presented some novel problems along the start line of today's first race. In the starts for each of the three classes, boats were called over early.

    IRC Three has evolved into a two-horse race between the X-37 Hansen and Le Moal's J/112E J-LANCE 12. Today definitely belonged to the French crew on J-LANCE 12 that won both races. They now lead, one point ahead of the Danes that posted a 3-2 for the day.

    Day Five- Thursday - Round Island Race
    Despite a scary-looking forecast and prolonged periods punching foul tide, the rescheduled race around the Isle of Wight proved a great success. This replaced the scheduled 24-36 hour long offshore, but all competitors nonetheless returned feeling severely tested to a summery Cowes, very different to the rain, near gale force gusts, four knot foul tide and reduced visibility of the morning's 0936 am start.

    In IRC Three Le Moal's J/112E J-LANCE 12 completely dominated. Winning the race left her on 9.5 points to the second placed JPK 1080 Shaitan's 24 pts.

    The performance by the IRC Three leader J-LANCE 12 was especially impressive, finishing among the IRC Two frontrunners. It was insanely close too; the Sunfast 3600 Redshift Reloaded was first across the line by mere seconds, but finished fourth under IRC.  The top four boats separated by just three and a half minutes with J-LANCE 12 winning by just 11 seconds on corrected time from Shaitan.

    "Going around the island is our bag," admitted Redshift Reloaded owner Ed Fishwick. "The conditions were good for us. We saw 30 knots at times going down the Solent. It was lively - very shifty and gusty, making driving conditions tricky. We even reefed halfway down to the first turning mark at The Needles, which we rarely do. Plus, there was an amazing contrast in the weather, stormy and wet this morning, but champagne sailing from St Catherine's onwards, with winds in the high teens or low 20s."

    They rounded the south side of the Isle of Wight glued to the shore to avoid the foul tide, but were in constant contact with their competitors. "It was great fun, very, very tight racing," continued Fishwick. "Ourselves, Shaitan and J-LANCE were within boat lengths of each other for miles and miles. They were pulling match racing-type maneuvers on us..."

    A man who has raced around the island more than most is David Bedford, this week calling the shots on Shaitan. "It was a great day out. It always is. We saw 30 knots up the first beat," Bedford mused. Interestingly while Bedford was British National Match Racing champion back in 1989, Redshift Reloaded's Nick Cherry held this same title four times between 2006 and 2011.

    Bedford said they stuck to their playbook, heading for mainland shore in the western Solent, then choosing the right time to return to the island side. They had nailed this and crossing a visible tide line put them into favorable tide. Like their competition, they then hugged the south side of the island.

    Two more days of sailing!  The French on the J/112E J-LANCE 12 will have to wait patiently to see if their favorite Veuve Clicquot Champagne can start flowing sooner than later!  For more IRC European Championship sailing information
     

     
    Thrilling Chicago NOOD Regatta
    J/111 KASHMIR Awarded Overall Regatta Win!
    (Chicago, IL)- The highly popular Helly Hansen Chicago NOOD Regatta was hosted by the Chicago YC, with sailing taking place on the fresh waters of Lake Michigan, off the spectacular Chicago city-front as their backdrop.

    The Chicago event is one of the biggest on the Helly Hansen Sailing World NOOD Regatta circuit.  This event included one-design classes for J/70s, J/105s, J/109s, J/111s, and J/88s. In addition, there was the North Sails Rally with ORR/PHRF divisions for a J/100, J/105, J/120, J/130, J/133, J/112E, and J/44. Of the 144 keelboats registered, 58 were J/Crews (40% of the fleet).

    In the end, it was the trio on the J/111 KASHMIR (Karl Brummel/ Steve Henderson/ Mike Mayer) that were awarded 1st in the J/111 class and also 1st Overall Winner of the regatta, earning a trip to the Caribbean this fall to sail on big, heavy, comfy charter boats for the Overall NOOD Regattas Championship.

    Day One- Friday
    Despite morning weather delays as lightning passed over Lake Michigan, crews competing in 11 classes completed two races during the first day of the annual Helly Hansen National Offshore One Design Regatta in Chicago. Now in its 30th year, the series is the largest and longest-running sailboat racing circuit in the country.

    Sailing conditions were difficult for the J/88 fleet, according to local skipper Andy Graff.

    “The challenge is that this boat is really tender and picky on rig tuning and sail tuning,” Graff said. “We didn’t know what we were going to get in terms of wind velocity, and it was important to make a last-minute call to get our best chance for the race.”

    Graff and his crew aboard Exile closely observed the conditions in the half hour before the first start, noting where the wind extremes and shifts were appearing on the racecourse. They changed sails several times before settling on a middle option, which helped then power through the waves and quickly change gears as needed.  Exile led the fleet heading into day two.

    Day Two- Saturday
    The 2018 Helly Hansen NOOD Regatta in Chicago’s second day concluded with two teams tied atop the J/70 class. With one final day of racing on the schedule, the pressure is firmly on the leaders.

    Andrew Criezis, skipper of the top-ranked boat, Rip Rullah, said he’s been relying on the skill of his crew to manage the fleet’s highly competitive racing and Lake Michigan’s challenging conditions.

    “I have an amazing team,” Criezis said. “We’ve worked really hard to push ourselves and go for competitive starts. We’re pushing the line, being aggressive and really going for a good position. The crew is doing a good job with their weight management, which is so critical in the J/70 in light to medium breeze. It’s really paid dividends for us — we had great speed upwind and downwind, smooth transitions and pretty good overall fleet engagement.”

    Because winds were light and shifty on Saturday, Criezis said constant sail trim was required to take advantage of small wind shifts throughout the day, and that was the key to Rip Rullah’s two race wins. The crew plans to stay on top of the weather — and hold on to today’s winning formula — to maintain their place atop the fleet.

    “It’s going to be about being consistent tomorrow, not making any big mistakes, keeping our eyes on the boat, being smart and really going for top-five finishes,” he said. “Have fun while we’re doing it, and we’ll be in a good position to close out the regatta.”

    Local skipper Jim Murray and his crew aboard Callisto currently lead the J/109 fleet. Murray and team have been taking great care to calculate how the variable wind, chop and fog will impact their boatspeed before making a decision on how to tune the boat for each race.

    “Conditions have been very challenging out there both days,” Murray said. “It hasn’t been physically challenging because we haven’t had big breeze, but it’s been mentally challenging having to adjust everything from rig tune to all of our sail controls every race.”

    Despite their comfortable lead, team Callisto isn’t yet counting on victory. The evenly matched, eight-boat fleet offers plenty of competition to keep things interesting on Sunday.

    “Anything could change, so consistency is really what it’s all been about for us,” he said. “We’ve been fortunate to have a few moves pay off, but we’re not taking anything for granted. We’re going to be prepared for a range of conditions tomorrow and try to stay conservative.”

    Day Three- Sunday Finale
    After three days of intense competition and challenging conditions on Lake Michigan, the Helly Hansen National Offshore One Design (NOOD) Regatta concluded its fourth stop of the season in Chicago on Sunday.

    Among the eleven class winners stood one above all: J/111 Kashmir, which earned the event’s overall title. The boat is co-owned by Steve Henderson, Mike Mayer and Karl Brummel.

    This was team Kashmir’s first major regatta of season in preparation for the J/111 North Americans later this summer, and the crew saw improvements in boatspeed throughout the weekend as they settled in with new sails.

    “I thought we were fast downwind and our speed upwind was OK on Friday, but not great,” Brummel said. “We had some boathandling problems that we were able to fix."

    Kashmir’s results on Friday were a second and a third, but in Saturday’s first race, said Brummel, “we just got launched, and fortunately the other top three or four boats somehow got buried. We just kept getting faster and faster; our speed upwind was probably better than anybody’s at the end of the regatta. We were breaking in new jibs, so it was the first time trimming those and getting the rig right.”

    The game plan going into the final race was to get a clean start and cover the competition, Brummel said. All they had to do was sail their boat well and sail better than everyone else.

    “But we failed to execute that plan,” he said. “We got a horrific start. We were second row, we tacked out to port and went right. It turns out there was a nice lane of pressure on the right that wasn’t on the left and we rounded the mark first.”

    Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good, he added, but what also helped was that the second-place boat was over the starting line early and had to restart.

    “That took some pressure off of us, but the third place boat got a good start so we were not thrilled with the first 30 seconds of the race,” Brummel said. “We were flat out lucky.”

    As the Helly Hansen Chicago NOOD’s overall winner, team Kashmir earns a berth in the Helly Hansen NOOD Caribbean Championship Regatta, presented by Sunsail in the British Virgin Islands this October.

    After the KASHMIR trio, the balance of the podium for the 111s was Jeff Davis’ SHAMROCK from Cleveland, OH (the J/111 Midwinter Champion in St Petersburg, FL) in second and Rich Witzel’s ROWDY from Chicago taking the bronze.

    Bruce Stone and Nicole Breault dominated the J/105 fleet at the Chicago NOOD Regatta. They were the only competitors in the entire regatta to score straight bullets.

    Bruce reports, “weather fronts rolled through each night into the morning, causing postponements and making steering difficult in the leftover lumpy conditions, with winds 7-10 knots, versus the 14-22 knots on SF Bay that can power us through the chop. Our mainly StFYC team worked well together and made the needed adjustments to keep the boat moving. Nicole tuned the rig for each race and made the calls to find the best pressure on the course. We managed six bullets in six races, extending our string to 11 straight wins over two regatta weekends with two mostly different crews. We might not get invited back to Chicago!"

    San Francisco native Bruce Stone was sailing in Chicago for the first time in nearly 40 years in anticipation of the 2018 J/105 North American Championship in nearby Harbor Springs, MI this July.

    Stone and his wife, Nicole Breault, own two J/105s of their own, but are chartering Gryphon from owner Sam Powers, who joined their crew.

    Behind Team GRYPHON were Jon Weglarz’s THE ASYLUM in second and Gyt Petkus’ VYTIS in third, both are local Chicago teams.

    Skipper Ben Marden on the J/88 BANTER echoed Bruce Stone’s thoughts on what it was like to sail in the tough conditions off the Chicago waterfront, praising his own crew aboard the BANTER for finding a good groove, as they train for the J/88 North Americans in Chicago this August. After a tricky first day, they made a radical decision that ultimately propelled them to four consecutive first-place finishes during the next two race days.

    “I was the only person who had the same job on the second day,” Marden said. “Five people changed jobs, and we stuck with the new positions. We loosened everything up and were more aggressive with rig tune and light-air boathandling. This was a great test for the team so we could take notes and come out of it with some new information on things we can improve upon.”

    This was Marden’s first Helly Hansen NOOD Regatta as a boat owner, and only his second regatta since buying the boat last winter.  The balance of the J/88 class podium included Chicagoan Andy Graff’s EXILE in second and Tim Wade’s WINDSONG from Bowling Green, OH in third.

    Local J/70 owner John Heaton also celebrated a “first” this weekend with his inaugural win in the J/70 class. For his crew on EMPEIRIA, the keys to the weekend were consistency, boatspeed and communication.

    “It was mainly about working really hard on speed all the time,” Heaton said. “That’s a testament to the team I have onboard. They work the boat really well. In the J/70s, it’s important to get free of other boats, put the bow down and go fast. That really helped us, especially today. We were confident in our boatspeed, got free of other boats and kept it rolling.”

    While constant discussions on speed and tactics fueled team EMPEIRIA, the winning boat in the regatta’s largest fleet found a different way to focus.  Behind them on the podium was Andrew Criezis’ RIP RULLAH taking the silver (the only other double-race winner), and Jake Christy’s PALE HORSE securing the bronze.

    The eight-boat J/109 class saw a seesaw battle take place between Jim Murray’s CALLISTO and Scott Sims’ SLAPSHOT II (a former Chicago Blackhawks player living in Wilmette, IL).  As an illustration of how tight and competitive the sailing was for the 109s, both boats only managed one 1st and two more podium finishes! In the end, it was Murray’s CALLISTO that finished with a 4-1-2-3-5 tally for 15 pts to take the class win.  Sims’ SLAPSHOT posted a 5-3-1-6-3 record for 18 pts to take the silver.  And rounding out the podium for the bronze was Keith Eickenberg’s BLACKFIN with a 1-4-5-4-7 scoreline for 21 pts.

    In the world of PHRF offshore handicap racing, the eight-boat PHRF 2 ToT fleet was Dan Leslie’s J/35 NOMATA post a 1-3-3-8 for 15 pts to hold on to the bronze, just barely.  And, in the North Sails Rally ORR 1 Division of twelve-boats, it was Tom Papoutsis’ J/133 RENEGADE that took home the silver. Sailing photo credits- Paul Todd/ Outside Images.  For more Helly Hansen Chicago NOOD Regatta sailing information
     

    Light and Variable NYYC 164th Annual Regatta
    J/111 Dominates PHRF 2! J/Crews Sweep IRC 5!
    (Newport, RI)- The Annual Regatta is North America’s oldest annual sailing event. It was first run in 1845 on the Hudson River and has been sailed out of the New York Yacht Club Harbour Court, in Newport, RI, since 1988. The 164th edition offered buoy or navigator-course racing for one-designs and yachts sailing under IRC, ORR, CRF and PHRF handicap over the June 9th and 10th weekend.

    The regatta won’t be remembered as one of the more memorable ones over a century and a half.  A large immovable high pressure system offshore kept Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound mostly covered in clouds with hardly an isobar or gradient breeze in sight. Saturday started out with some promise, but the light northerly died in the middle of many races, went to zero for a period of time, then flowed in lightly from the southeast as a thermal with not much punch behind it across all race courses.  Then, Sunday dawned with an even worst forecast, again with a light northerly, that died anyways, followed on by a very light 4-6 kts southeast wind for the inside courses and across-the-board cancellations of most races offshore in Rhode Island Sound.

    Nevertheless, despite the conditions, some of the battle-hardened J/Teams proved to be up to the challenge and walked off with a fair amount of silverware.

    A winter of one-design racing in St. Petersburg and Annapolis proved to be a great experience for Doug Curtiss' team on the J/111 WICKED 2.0. Matching up against a fleet of World-class J/111s is a great way to learn precisely how to squeeze every drop of the speed out of the 36-footer.

    "It tends to hone the skills a little bit," Curtiss says with a laugh. "We learned a lot."

    Still Curtiss came into the weekend, where he raced in the PHRF 2 class, with modest expectations.

    "We like to be top third and just go out there and have some fun," he says. "If I had to say there's a signature that I hope to leave on the Wicked program, it's that we have great crew chemistry, everybody has fun and we just like to be competitive.“

    With a first in Saturday’s single race— a marathon that took teams all of four hours to complete—and a second on the sole race on Sunday, Curtiss exceeded all his goals. WICKED 2.0 won the class  over Phil Lotz, Commodore of the New York Yacht Club, who was racing the new NYYC IC37 in its inaugural Annual Regatta.  Taking fourth was another J/111, Abhijeet Lee’s VARUNA.

    In the PHRF 3 Navigator class of ten-boats, EC Helme’s J/92S SPIRIT was leading the class by one point going into Sunday’s only race. However, unfortunately snatching defeat from the jaws of victory with a 6th in the last race to drop into second with a 2-2-6 tally for 10 pts.

    What may be perhaps one of the most astonishing outcome for this light airs event was the complete sweep of the top five in IRC 5 Class.  The winner was determined on a tie-breaker between Bill Sweetser’s J/109 RUSH and Chris Lewis’ KENAI, each finished with 5 pts total.  The countback saw Sweetser’s 109 RUSH crew take the win based on winning the last race.  Third was Tom Sutton’s renowned Houston, TX crew on their J/109 LEADING EDGE with 6 pts.  Fourth was also determined on a tie-breaker between Albrecht Goethe’s J/109 HAMBURG and Paul Milo’s J/122 ORION at 10 pts apiece, with HAMBURG taking the countback.  For more NYYC Annual Regatta sailing information
     

    J’s Cruise Annapolis to Bermuda Race
    (Newport, RI)- The biennial Annapolis to Bermuda Ocean Race took place over the past week with J/crews collecting a few more pickle-dishes for their trophy rooms.  Hosted by the Eastport YC and the Royal Hamilton Amateur Dinghy Club in Bermuda, the 753nm race is the longest ocean race on the east coast of the U.S.A., delivering a unique combination of inshore and offshore racing through its route down the Chesapeake Bay (starting in Annapolis, MD), across the Gulf Stream, and onto Bermuda.

    Winning CRCA ORR handicap division was Bob Dunigan’s J/124 JANE SAYS.  Then, it a truly heart-warming story, it was Oklahoma native Lynn McClaskey’s J/110 CIMARRON that took the silver in PHRF 2 Class.

    Here is Lynn’s amazing story about how she fell in love with sailing while growing up in Tulsa, Oklahoma, thousands of miles away from either the Atlantic or Pacific Oceans.

    “We have a lot of lakes in Oklahoma and they’re all dammed for power supply and agriculture,” McClaskey said. “Considering the way the wind comes whipping down from the plains, sailing really is a natural pursuit.”

    McClaskey was a longtime member of the Windycrest Sailing Club and initially raced a Thistle with her family. She got into junior sailing and became quite proficient at racing a Sunfish, Laser and 470 on Keystone Lake.

    McClaskey moved east for work purposes as she’s an analyst with the United States Department of Defense. She has lived in Crofton (MD) for 20 years and got involved with big boat racing out of Annapolis, crewing for various skippers in the J/30 class.

    In 2012, McClaskey competed in the Annapolis to Bermuda Race aboard a C&C 38 named Dare Greatly, which was owned by Joe Donahue. Her first thought upon completing the challenge?

    “Hey, I could do that!” McClaskey said to herself.

    So McClaskey bought a J/110 the following year and began the long process of preparing herself and the boat for ocean racing. She previously owned a C&C 27 that was equipped with “lifeline netting and car seats” as she cruised with two young children.

    “I’ve been working on the boat ever since I got it in 2013,” McClaskey said, who served as a safety inspector for the 2014 Annapolis to Bermuda Race in order to gain an even better understanding of what is required of a skipper. “I didn’t want to go offshore until I was absolutely certain it was completely ship-shape.”

    She entered the biennial race two years later with CIMARRON, which is named after one of the rivers that flows into Keystone Lake in Oklahoma, placing second in PHRF Spinnaker 2. The J/110 was the first boat in its class to exit the Chesapeake Bay, but could not maintain that pace during the ocean crossing and wound up being overtaken by the J/42 Schematic (Robert Fox from Arlington, Virginia).

    “It wasn’t quite the result I wanted,” McClaskey said. “That was my first big offshore passage and there were many, many lessons learned. I think the most important lesson is that a lot of the race is won or lost before you leave the dock in terms of preparing the boat and developing a plan.”

    McClaskey subscribes to the theory that one has not truly lost until they quit trying. So, she is doing Annapolis to Bermuda again this year with the intent of capturing class honors and finishing further up within the overall fleet.

    This time around, CIMARRON has been slotted into PHRF II, which has attracted 10 entries that are all different designs. Among the competition is a J/42, Frers 41, Outbound 44, C&C 37 and Sabre 38.

    “We have been working ever since the last Annapolis to Bermuda to prepare for this year’s race,” said McClaskey, one of only two female skippers entered. “It’s a big organizational challenge to get all the training, equipment and skills you need. A key element is building a crew that you trust, and that is something that has happened over time by doing more and more sailing.”

    McClaskey appreciates that everyone has pitched in to help prepare the J/110. “Any offshore boat is going to have a long list. Those big jobs are getting smaller and smaller, as we speak. We have a great mixture of skills and have trained for every situation– man overboard, firefighting, losing rudder, and losing rig. We’ve rehearsed it all.”  Thanks for contribution from Bill Wagner-  The Baltimore Sun.  For more Annapolis to Bermuda Ocean Race sailing information
     

    Sweden Midsummer Solo Challenge a Success!
    (Stockholm, Sweden)- Without a doubt, Swedish offshore sailor and entrepreneur extraordinaire, Peter Gustafsson, is always thinking, always dreaming, always innovating, wondering how to do things better in business as well as indulging in his favorite pastime- sailing his J/111 BLUR.SE.

    Recently, Peter had yet another spasm of inspiration, commenting, “we have a crazy new side project, to start a solo archipelago race through Bohuslän. 125 nm with no rules.  We managed to fill 60 slots within 24 hours of announcing the race! 48 boats started, 15 finished (due to light winds and two nights at sea).  Nevertheless, the first edition of Midsummer Solo Challenge lived up to expectations. Remember, that far north in Scandinavia, it is “sunset twilight” all night long, the sun never fully sets!

    Here is Peter’s commentary on the race from aboard his beloved J/111 BLUR.SE:

    “How about 50 solo sailors completing a 125 nm course through one of the world's most beautiful archipelagos, in the middle of the light and warm Swedish summer night?

    When the initiative was launched six months ago, the initial 50 spots filled up within 24 hours. We’ve seen the popularity of similar races, like the Danish Silverrudder, but a true archipelago race for solo sailors is something new.

    On Thursday evening, 48 skippers met for a three course dinner and a weather briefing promising light to moderate winds from south... and lots of sunshine! Administration was kept to a minimum, and everyone just had to put a signature on a list to verify that they intended to take part.

    A few of us had a final beer, but then everyone wandered off to their boats to prepare for the challenge ahead.

    Friday morning, the mini class (boats from 18 to 25 feet) stated at 10:00 in 4-8 knots of wind from SW. With a mix of downwind sails set, the group set off to the north. As the second group started an hour later, the first wrestled with some major decisions; inshore through the small straights and through the picturesque fishing village of Gullholmen, or the westerly route close to Käringön and the landmark lighthouse of Måseskär. Inshore is shorter, but offshore you can catch a current pushing you north at 2 knots. One of many decisions to be made in the coming 24-48 hours.

    Leif Jägerbrand in his Seascape 24, loved the conditions, took the shortest route and quickly extended his lead.

    At 13:00 the bigger boats left Marstrand, trying to hunt down the smaller boats ahead. J/111 Blur with Peter Gustafsson was expected to be the fastest boat, and showed pace and set of offshore before hoisting his huge 155 sqm gennaker.

    Late afternoon, the different classes started to mix, gybing through the islands ticking of Lysekil, Hållö, Smögen and many of the anchorages where people spend their summer vacation. It’s easy to spend 4-5 weeks cruising here and each night find a new amazing spot to anchor.  It was a strange feeling to cover the same distance in a day.

    When the sun set, the leading boats were leaving Fjällbacka and aimed for the northern mark of Ramskär. The wind became even lighter, and some struggled to keep their boats going. It is always a special feeling to turn the boat around and sail towards the finish. But knowing it would be 15-30 hours of light upwind sailing and adverse current everyone understood the meaning of the word ”challenge”.

    The first three boats, the Seascape 24, Jonas Dyberg in his J/88 and J/111 Blur stayed in the archipelago to avoid the current. Short tacking south, they reached the finish late afternoon. The smaller boats had a duel where the Seascape had to give in to the J/88 after leading the way for almost 30 hours. Blur crossed the line within the hour to post the fastest time around the course with 27 hours 35 minutes and 3 seconds.  Second was Dyberg’s J/88.

    But that didn’t really matter. No winner was announced; no awards were handed out and the important thing was to prove to yourself that you could do it. And naturally to receive the t-shirts with ”FINISHER” printed at the back.

    The three finishers had dinner, wondering if anyone else would make it. The wind had slowly died and many boats were parked with the finish in sight. Another bunch where anchored or drifting at Måseskär, as every attempt to get past just resulted in being pushed back by the current.

    Would the skippers have the patience and endurance to hang in there and wait for the morning breeze? Later Saturday night, a few boats trickled in, managing to cross the line.  Early morning, a few more, and after 46 hours Staffan Cederlöf closed the gate in his red Compis 28 Retro Balloon.

    All in all, 15 boats of the 48 that started, managed to complete the Midsummer Solo Challenge. And as always, it came down to grit and sheer will. It wouldn’t be surprising to see all of them, and quite a few more, back next year to challenge themselves again.

    Enjoy this entertaining J/88 sailing video from Jonas Dyberg
    https://youtu.be/GSTO0kPmqUU

    The story and results in Swedish: http://www.blur.se/2018/06/11/midsummer-solo-challenge-2018/

    For more information about the Midsummer Challenge Race- please contact Peter Gustafsson- M: +46 733 304000 / E: peter@blur.se
     

    WV Uitdam Tops Dutch J/70 Sailing League- Act II
    (Roermond, The Netherlands)- The first match of the Dutch J/70 Sailing League sailed in Roermond resulted in a number of surprising teams in the top of the ranking. Under difficult conditions with little wind, Watersportvereniging Uitdam performed the most consistently to win the weekend event after sailing just six races for each of the fifteens sailing club teams on Saturday.

    Day One
    The sailors from WV Uitdam showed their class and immediately took the lead in the rankings on the first day.  Under the guidance of their new and talented skipper, Guido Buwalda, they reached a point total of only 8 points after five flights. Remarkable, because it is only his third time sailing the J/70 and the first time as skipper during an event. Said Buwalda at the end of racing, “this is fun, it is really good racing".

    Wietze Zetzema, one of the founders of Team WV Uitdam, adds, ”this is exactly what we stand for as Uitdam, giving a mix of experience and young talent the chance and opportunity to sail in such high level competition. That it works out so well, is only beautiful."

    The hosts of the regatta, RR&ZV Maas and Roer were certainly hoping to be in contention for the lead after a strong day of sailing. A penalty in race four meant they did not take the lead after day one. Max Visser, skipper of Maas and Roer, does not hide his enthusiasm for the racing in Roermond, “it is really nice to sail here. The atmosphere is good and it is well organized. It is also nice to put Limburg on the map as a water sport province. There is a lot of nice water in Limburg, but not many people know that. Winning this stage is our goal. We sailed well in Almere, so we be near the top of the league."

    WV Almere Centraal, two-time National Champion and winner of the first round at Almere Centraal, had a slightly harder time. After a day of racing they were in fifth place.

    Day Two
    On Saturday, WV Uitdam took the only victory in the only race they sailed. A 1st place in the 6th flight turned out to be the key to win the regatta; little did anyone anticipate that would be the case. After that flight of races, the wind died completely for the rest of the day.

    Day Three
    An attempt was made to run two races in the early morning breeze of up to 7 kts.  However, it was impossible to complete the full flight before the wind died off completely.  As a result, WV Uitdam was declared victor of Act II.  Second was the RR&ZV Maas & Roer team, followed by the VW De Twee Provincien club in third.

    Team WV Uitdam had a completely new team optimized for the light wind conditions.

    "On Friday, we chose to attack with our flyweight crew and immediately took the lead. On Saturday, we had to sail against a number of our direct competitors in the first race and therefore opted for more conservative tactics,” said an elated skipper Jan van Wengerden. A tactic that obviously worked out well for Uitdam.

    "It's nice to surprise everyone again. Sometimes, we are not so good at an event and we do not perform well. But, if we do, we are really good enough to compete for victory. We think we had one of the lightest crews this weekend, every downwind run we would gain a few critical meters for tactical advantage at mark roundings. Honestly, if there were over 15 knots of wind we probably would not have won here."

    RR&ZV Maas & Roer New Series Leader
    As they had in Almere Centraal, the Maas & Roer team again took second place. Thanks to their consistent results, they now took over the overall series lead with a 2-2 tally. They now lead the reigning national champion WV Almere Centraal that has posted a 1-8. Third overall are Jachtclub Scheveningen with a 3-5.
      Follow the Dutch J/70 Sailing League here on Facebook  For more Dutch J/70 Sailing League information
     

    WV Hemelingen Lead German J/70 Sailing League
    (Tutzing, Germany)- The German J/70 Sailing League (DSBL) returned to the place where everything began five years ago- Tutzing on Lake Starnberg, hosted by the Deutscher Touring YC (DTYC)- for the season opener that was sailed from June 8th to 10th on the incredibly picturesque lake.

    Exactly five years ago (June 7, 2013), 18 clubs joined the Deutsche Touring YC for the first time in the history of yacht racing, competing in a club competition. Sailors, clubs and the media were so excited by the idea that the league has continued with great success. Much has happened in the meantime, from the initial 18 clubs in the DSBL, to today’s 36 clubs that participate in two leagues. The league is no longer just a pastime, because whoever participates here wants to win. But, the DSBL itself has also undergone a major development process: the number of well-known sponsors is increasing, as well as the number of employees and the number of European countries adapting to the league format.

    "The league is back to its roots and a lot has changed since then. We are pleased that we were able to participate in this development and are now organizing an event for the fourth time. No league club can handle such a league event alone, so DTYC, together with the Munich Yacht Club (MYC) and the Chiemsee Yacht Club (CYC), cooperated together to host the event. We therefore, thank the associations of the region and, in particular, the MYC and the CYC for the support " said Wolfgang Stückl from DTYC.

    To the surprise of most leading teams on the circuit, it was a newcomer to the DSBL that took the win on Lake Starnberg.  The Wassersport-Verein Hemelingen won the second round of the DSL at Tutzing.  The 36 sailing clubs participating were able to complete a total of 63 very close and exciting races.

    "We had a great event here in Tutzing and are very happy that we could achieve the victory here. A big thank you goes to the race committee, who did a great job," said Eike Martens of the WV Hemelingen. Their team consisted of Carsten Kemmling, Eike Martens, Markus Maisenbacher and Tjorben Wittor. The Chiemsee Yacht Club and the Segelkameradschaft Das Wappen von Bremen placed second and third, respectively.

    The host club, the Deutscher Touring YC, could not use its supposed home advantage. The team, based around champion helmsman Julian Stückl, did not seem to find the right way around the racetrack and, therefore, finished the event in 14th place- a bit of a shocker for the defending DSBL champions.

    Overall, the sailors had to prove they had nerves of steel. The three-day weekend threw everything at them in terms of weather that you could possibly imagine: extremely shift winds, light winds, no wind, sun, thunderstorms, tropical downpours, and on Sunday afternoon, winds up to 13 kts or more.  Tutzing “threw the book” at the sailors in terms of wildly disparate sailing conditions to determine whether they had the diversity and tenacity to sail to prevail and win.

    The third DSBL event will take place from July 21st to 23rd, as part of the Travemünde Week in Travemünde, Germany.  Sailing photo credits- Lars Wehrmann. For tracking, results, and analytics, please visit SAP Sailing  For more Deutsche J/70 Segel-Bundesliga sailing information
     

    TINTO Crowned Australian J/24 Midwinter Champion
    (Cronulla, Sydney, Australia)- The 2018 Australian J/24 Midwinter Championship had fourteen hot, talented crews ready to do battle to be crowned Midwinter Champion over the June 8th to 10th weekend.  The event was hosted by the Cronulla Sailing Club, racing in the waters of Bate Bay on Saturday and the Port Hacking Estuary on Sunday.

    Saturday began in a light 4-8 knot breeze. Dave Mclachlan, the Cronulla SC PRO and his team on the start boat, got proceedings underway on time.

    David West and his crew on ACE were using this regatta in their lead up to representing Australia at the J/24 World Championships in Lago di Garda, Italy later this year. They won the start and won the first race ahead of NSW J24 President, John Crawford, on INNAMINCKA in second, and Bryce Edwards driving WOOD DUCK in third.

    Second race saw the forever-young David McKay in STAMPED URGENT rise to the top, with INNAMINCKA in second and again newcomer to the class, WOOD DUCK third.

    The PRO kept things moving in a dying breeze and race three got underway. Stephen Wright’s TINTO took first.  West’s ACE was second, with McKay’s STAMPED URGENT again making an appearance in third.

    The fourth, and what ended up being the final race, for the day saw TINTO again take first with WOOD DUCK in second and Janette Syme’s WILDFIRE arriving in third. Sails were then dropped, and each J/24 mounted there 3.5 hp engines of fury, for the motor back to Cronulla Sailing Club for an evening BBQ with the sun disappearing on the horizon.

    Day 2 and someone ordered wind right?  With the southerly gear-buster (as forecast) hitting early Sunday morning, there was no question wind for racing was a non-issue.  A steady 20 knots, with 30-knot busters, made for some interesting times and some equipment failure.  Can anyone gybe without broaching?

    Race 5 saw the girls from Sandringham YC, with Kirsty Harris driving HYPERACTIVE; win pole position followed by Mr Consistency TINTO and WOOD DUCK in third. Race 6 saw WOOD DUCK popping to the top, followed again by TINTO, with INNAMINCKA in third. Race 7 saw WOOD DUCK again hit first, TINTO in second and STAMPED URGENT in third. Cool! Cronulla Boats 1-2-3!!

    This is where the PRO decided enough was enough and racing was concluded. However, the crowd on Bass and Flinders Point had enjoyed watching the colorful sails and inspecting the clean hull of VERTIGO “keel-flapping” away after one wild broach.  Such is life on J/24s.

    Final results, congratulations to Stephen Wright and TINTO first on scratch and handicap. Second on scratch was Class newcomer Bryce Edwards in his dad’s J/24 WOOD DUCK; could be an interesting discussion leading into the States in November. Bryce also achieved 3rd on handicap. Second on handicap was J/24 Southern Sydney Fleet President, John Zagame driving JARGON with third overall going to the forever-young David McKay on STAMPED URGENT.

    The Organizing Committee would like to thank all of the events sponsors- Infinity Rigging, Wet Tech Rigging, AUSSEA Sailing School, Cronulla Marina, SPOT-A-YACHT Photography, Sail Connect, Ocean Sports and Newton Real Estate.

    Lastly, events like this are only as successful as the unpaid volunteers- “Thank you” to all who contributed on BBQs, driving support boats, dock duties, and just generally being there. This list of volunteers is too long to mention them all by name, however, special mention goes to Jared Macquart, supporting this event since its inception through his professional advice on boat set up, maintenance assistance including supply of tools to effect emergency repairs to INNAMINCKA on Friday afternoon. Cheers Jared and thanks for the ongoing support!  Sailing photo credits- SPOT-A-YACHT.com. For more Australian J/24 Midwinters sailing information
     

    J/Crews Raise Big $$ For Annapolis Leukemia Cup
    (Annapolis, MD)- An enormously successful 26th Annual Leukemia Cup was held on Saturday, June 2nd, 2018, to support the Leukemia Foundation, hosted jointly by Annapolis YC and Eastport YC.  As a leukemia survivor, Annapolis’ own famous and legendary sailor, Gary Jobson, was a proud host for the event that raised thousands of dollars to support research and support for the Leukemia Foundation.

    Dozens of J/Sailors participated in the event, sailing in a combination of one-design classes and PHRF handicap classes.  Focused on having fun and raising funds for a worthy cause, J/classes included J/30s, J/35s, J/80s, J/105s and PHRF classes.

    In the five-boat J/30 class, it was Tristan & Sheila Keen’s INFECTION SMILE taking class honors.  Topping the four-boat J/35 class was Bruce Artman’s T-BONE.  Leading home the six-boat J/80 fleet was Ken Mangano’s MANGO.  The eleven-boat J/105 class, the biggest contributors class-wise, saw John White’s USA 113 take the honors.  In PHRF N Class, Steve Grimm’s PANDORA was 3rd. And, in CRCA-ORR division, it was Dan Leonard’s pretty J/100 FLASHPOINT winning class.  For more Annapolis Leukemia Cup sailing information
     

    LA SUPERBA Dominates Italian J/24 Championship
    (Riva del Garda, Italy)- The 38th Italian Open J/24 Championship finished after eight races in the waters of Garda Trentino.  At the end of August, the same course will host the J/24 World Championship where more than 80 boats have already registered.

    For Ignacio Bonanno, skipper of Italian Navy ITA 416 LA SUPERBA, this was their fifth Italian title in the J/24 Class- the previous ones were 2011, 2012, 2015 and 2017 (in addition to the J/24 Europeans title). It was a gratifying win for Bonanno and his crew- Simone Scontrino, Vincenzo Vano, Francesco Picaro and Alfredo Branciforte.  "We would like to thank the Italian Navy and, in particular the Sport and Sailing Office, for allowing us to be present at this Championship,” commented Bonanno. “We are very happy, especially, for having won for the first time the Italian J/24 Championship on a lake!”

    Second in the Open classification, as last year, was the American J/24 star from Seattle, Washington- Keith Whittemore’s FURIO with crew of Kevin Downey, Brian Thomas, Mark Rogers, Shelley Milne.

    Third overall, and second Italian on the podium, was the crew of ARIA from Sardinia. The crew consisted of skipper Marco Frulio, Mattia Meloni, Fabrizio Masu, Grazia Maria Savona and GianVito Di Stefano.

    "We are very happy with this result and we want to thank our Club,” commented Marco Frulio. “We are obviously used to other conditions and also, those found in these days on the Garda were not what we would have expected. We had to settle a bit and study the lake, the wind, and the weather. In the end, we learned to interpret the new conditions, the wind shifts and to choose (unlike many crews, even local ones) the center of the lake, a choice that eventually proved to be a winner. We are really happy. "

    Bronze medal in the National ranking and fifth overall was NOTIFYME-PILGRIM owned by Lario Mauro Benfatto and helmed by Fabio Mazzoni (with crew of Lorenzo Airoldi, Alberto Benedetti, & Pietro Kostner). "It was a great championship and I really enjoyed it," commented Mauro Benfatto. "We had the opportunity to race with really good people, very good. Overall a very positive and fun Championship that made us stay on pace until the last race.”

    The Italian J/24 Championship was an excellent opportunity for the teams to test the competition and learn the waters of Lago di Garda prior to the J/24 World Championship scheduled in Riva del Garda from 23 to 31 August.  For more Italian J/24 Class sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
    * J/24 Women’s Sea Bags Sailing Team District 1 Championship Report- from Erica Beck Spencer

    “We wrapped a wonderful District 1 Championship with twelve teams racing in quaint and historical New Castle, NH just next to Portsmouth.

    The regatta qualified one berth for the 2019 J/24 World Championship in Miami, Florida. Mental Floss from Long Island joined the competition, but the majority of the competitors were local or from Maine.

    On Saturday the conditions were light, almost too light to race, but the race committee was able to get off 2 races.

    In the first race, local knowledge paid and the two locals who went left toward shore rounded the windward mark way in front of those who went right (the majority of the fleet). Andrius Keturakis with Bad Dog finished first and Caleb Sloan with Blue Scoop finished second. In the next and last extremely light air races, three boats from Maine took the 1-2-3 spots.  Carter White’s team YouRegatta pulled off a bullet, followed by Erica Beck Spencer’s team, the Sea Bags Women’s Sailing Team, followed closely by Andrew Carey’s Mr Hankey.

    Knowing that we were only going to get one good day of racing in and had to be off the water by 1530 on Sunday, the race committee made the decision to start us at 1000 hrs on Sunday.

    Sunday morning arrived and the chilly breezes made many of us think about wool socks and winter hats. The forecast was for a high of 58 F, the breeze was on, and so were the waves.

    The breeze ranged from about 12-16 knots and the waves were as large as 6-8’ but averaged around 4’. This made it super challenging to drive the boats upwind, even by the most experienced drivers struggled…

    The race committee was able to get off SIX races on Sunday!  Amazing! Some of them short, like dinghy courses. And, for those of us who couldn’t get off the starting line, sometimes seemed too short!!  Six races with little time in between each race, made it seem a bit like a blur to the competitors.  But, Carter White’s team, YouRegatta hammered the fleet all day. With 8 races they had a total of 11 points after the drop— 5 bullets!  Aidan Glackin’s team from Lloyd Harbor on Long Island, finished in second place. The Sea Bags Women’s Sailing Team finished in third and qualified for Worlds, as the top two teams had already qualified!! Finn Hadlock’s BOREAS team and Andrew Carey’s team tied for fourth, but Finn won the tiebreaker.

    To give you a sense for what the conditions were like when the breeze and waves were on, we spoke to Aidan Glackin about driving upwind. Aidan is consistently one of the top Corinthian sailors at events.

    He said, “We experienced some of the toughest driving conditions on Sunday. The large seas and diminishing wind made it incredibly difficult to drive. It took us most of the day to realize the genoa would backwind when you were coming down the wave and load up going up the wave, you really had to concentrate on driving straight and not chasing the telltales.” Tough driving conditions for sure.

    Overall, Rob Pruyn, Lenny Cushing, Peter Follansbeeand and the rest of the team of volunteers did an amazing job pulling off a great event. From the looks on people’s faces and the number of teams that stuck around for the awards ceremony, it is clear that all are looking forward to going back to race there again another day!”

    *  Steve Henderson, Mike Mayer and Karl Brummel were partners in a J/105 many years ago, but when the J/111 came to the scene, they made the leap immediately and have since continued to be one of the best and most polished teams in the class. Much of the their success has little to do with speed—although they have plenty of it—but rather the chemistry of the squad and their collective focus on efficiency all the way around the racecourse.

    “It’s one of those things where we love each other and it’s worked out well for everybody,” says Brummel of the partnership. “When things need to be bought or break, it’s 33 cents on the dollar. Good guys, good sailors and we get more use out of the boat.”

    When the races are more casual, the three owners move around the boat into different positions, but for serious regattas like the NOOD, Mayer drives. “In conditions like we had this weekend where it’s light and lumpy, he’s just really fast,” says Brummel.

    Henderson trims mainsail or jib while Brummel will either command the bow or the pit. The Helly Hansen NOOD Regatta Chicago, he admits, was the first time he worked the pit in a major regatta. “It worked out fine,” he says with a laugh, and later admits a few errors lead to mistakes in his department.

    Boat prep also falls on Brummel and while Kashmir looks perfect today, there’s still a long list of small improvements on his worklist. “We’ve had it for eight years and are comfortable with where we are,” he says. “The running rigging gets tired and things like that, but there’s nothing major. The boat is in good shape and we just need to sail it better.

    “I thought we were fast downwind and our speed upwind was OK on Friday but not great,” says Brummel. “We had some boathandling problems that we were able to fix, so Friday was OK [with a second and third] and then Saturday, in the first race, we just got launched. Fortunately, the other top three or four boats somehow got buried.”

    Race after race, the team’s speed improvements were noticeable as they honed the rig tune and trim of their new jibs. Boathandling issues were resolved, particularly with the spinnaker work, and the difference was obvious. “Mike commented on Friday that there was some running around and more urgency, but as things get smoother and the crew moves together there’s less pounding on the deck,” says Brummel. “You can really feel when everyone’s settled in and in the right spot. The boat just goes better. Quiet boats are fast boats.”

    Brummel attributed Kashmir’s downwind speed to the coordination of Mayer on the helm and trimmer Zach Hernandez. “He’s a rockstar,” says Brummel. “Mike and Zach work really well together and working the boat as hard as we can. It showed this weekend.”

    Come Sunday morning, Kashmir held the overall lead, but barely, over this highly competitive fleet. Their game plan going into the one and final race was to get a clean start and cover the competition, said Brummel. All they had to do was sail their boat well.

    “But we failed to execute that plan,” he says. “We got a horrific start. We were second row, we tacked out to port and went right. It turns out there was a nice lane of pressure on the right that wasn’t on the left and we rounded the mark first.”

    Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good, he adds, but what also helped was that the second-place boat was over the starting line early and had to restart. “That took some pressure off of us, but the third-place boat got a good start so we were not thrilled with the first 30 seconds of the race,” says Brummel. “We were flat out lucky.”

    That luck earned Kashmir the class win and the Helly Hansen NOOD Regatta Chicago’s overall title, which nets them a spot at the NOOD Caribbean Championship in October. Before then, they have the big J/111 class championship and a host of other events on Lake Michigan so there’s a lot of sailing yet to come.  Sailing photo credit- Paul Todd/ Outside Images.

    * J/34 IOR KNEE DEEP is at it again!  Will they ever slow down??  

    Knee Deep continues to sail its way back home, via the Mills Trophy Race. After a fast start to the season in Detroit, racing the Detroit YC Memorial Day & Bayview One Design Regattas Katie and Brett Langolf headed south to Lake Erie's North Cape Yacht Club, then to Toledo for the annual night race across Lake Erie. You do not only round marks on this race, you factor shoals, islands and even a military shooting range into the course! But, regardless of the obstacle that night, it was upwind and more upwind - something the J/34IOR loves. They hammered out a 3rd in Class on the President's Trophy Course.

    Next Up Cleveland Race Week Women's Race and then the CRW Offshore Regatta. Add to Flipboard Magazine.

    Read more...
  • J/Newsletter- June 6th, 2018 J/70 Europeans Preview
    (Vigo, Spain)- Seventy-eight teams from 15 countries will contest the 2018 J/70 Class European Championship, organized by the Real Club Náutico de Vigo.

    13 races are scheduled over five days, racing in the stunning Ria de Vigo on the Atlantic coast of Northwest Spain. The Real Club Náutico de Vigo is providing a warm welcome to competitors with social occasions throughout the regatta.

    USA, USA, USA!
    Reigning J/70 World Champion, Peter Duncan's RELATIVE OBSCURITY team (Willem van Waay, Victor Diaz de Leon, and Max Hutcheson) will be representing the USA. “I decided to race in Europe this season because the competition is great. The European teams sail the J/70s very well,” commented Peter.  “Last year in England and Italy, the hospitality was fantastic, everybody was very helpful, and the events were very well put together. I have never sailed in Vigo, but I have heard some great things about the conditions and the venue, so is a great opportunity. The intensity and level of racing in Europe is definitely on the up, and there are 78 boats signed up for Vigo, which is terrific. I hope they race us on one line, that would be really interesting.”

    Viva Espana!
    The host nation Spain has the largest entry by country with 22 teams entered. Gonzalo Araujo's LaGuardia & Moreira was crowned Spanish National Champion in the run up to the main event, and will be representing the host club for the J/70 European Championships. Jose María Torcida's NOTICIA was runner up for the 2017 J/70 European Championships, and is a two-time winner of the J/80 Worlds. J/70 Spanish Class President, Willy Alonso will be racing ENERSYS in his home waters, the highly experienced sailor from Vigo will be hard to beat.

    Made in Brazil
    Faria Renato's TO NESSA has made the long journey from the Rio de Janeiro Yacht Club in Brazil. At the 2018 Bacardi Cup, in a hot fleet of 47 J'70s, TONESSA came 8th carrying a DSQ from Day One. Horacio Carabelli will be sailing with all family members on URUBU. Horacio has won the Snipe Worlds twice, competed at the Olympic Games, and been part of numerous teams for the America's Cup and Volvo Ocean Race.

    British Armada Invasion
    Twelve teams from Great Britain form the largest group from overseas. Olympic sailors and World Champions will be racing with owner-drivers including Graham Clapp's JEEPSTER, with reigning Nacra 17 World Champion Ben Saxton, and Olympic 49er sailor Sophie Ainsworth. Simon Ling's TEAM SPITFIRE, 2015 Corinthian J/70 World Champions, will also be in the thick of the action.

    Viva d’Italia
    Eleven teams are entered from Italy. Claudia Rossi's PETITE TERRIBLE will be gunning for a hat-trick of European titles, having won the event for the last two years. Claudia's father, Alberto Rossi, will be racing ENFANT TERRIBLE. Alberto is a past Farr 40 World Champion and three times ORC World Champion. Reigning J/70 Corinthian Class World Champion, Gianfranco Noe's WHITE HAWK will be racing. Vincenzo Onorato will be racing for the Yacht Club de Monaco under the name of his well know America's Cup Syndicate MASCALZONE LATINO.

    From Russia With Love
    Valeria Kovalenko will be competing, hoping to take the prize for the top women helm. Melges 24 World Champion, Fabio Gridelli will be amongst her crew on ARTTUBE RUS-1. Another notable Russian entry is 2013 J/80 World Champion, Alexey Semenov and Hugo Rocha racing NEW TERRITORIES.

    From Turkey, Ahmet Eker's team EKER KAYMAK, includes 2012 Melges 24 World Champion, Enrico Fonda. Fredrik Hedlund's Swiss team racing AGERA3 includes Christoph Berger, past Swiss National Finn Champion and 5.5 Metre World Champion.

    Vigo is an ancient fishing city on Spain’s northwest Atlantic coast in Galicia. The mouth of the nearby Vigo Estuary is sheltered by the Cíes Islands, which form part of the Atlantic Islands National Park. The Cíes are known for their bird life and crescent-shaped Rodas Beach. The Ria de Vigo forms a superb natural location for the J/70 European Championships, and the city of Vigo has a renowned old quarter, home to plazas with towering ancient houses, which have been homes to fishermen for hundreds of years.
    A J/70 European Championship preview can be viewed here on Facebook  Follow and share the J/70 Europeans here on Facebook  For more J/70 European Championship sailing information
     


    IRC Europeans Preview
    (Cowes, England)- The Royal Ocean Racing Club will be hosting a stellar fleet of thirty-three teams from nine countries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Great Britain, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Turkey, USA) at their Cowes, Isle of Wight facility this coming weekend for the 2018 IRC European Championship, incorporating the famous Commodore’s Cup.  The event will be a great “test” event for many of Europe’s top offshore teams that are also planning to participate in the IRC/ ORC World Championship that will be taking place in The Hague, The Netherlands in a few weeks time.

    Several J/crews are participating. The British J/122E team on JUNO will be led by her owner/skipper Chris Daniel in the twelve-boat IRC 2 class.  Also, sailing against them will be the USA crew on Andy Middleton’s J/120 SUNSET.

    The twelve-boat IRC 3 Class includes two J/Crews; Fred Bouvier’s hot French crew on the J/112E J-LANCE 12 and the British team on John Smart’s J/109 JUKEBOX.

    So far, J-LANCE 12 has proven to be a consistent winner, having won her class in the enormously popular SPI OUEST France Regatta earlier in the spring. J-LANCE 12 skipper is Didier Le Moal, Managing Director of J/Composites.

    “We are sure it will be a great competition," says Commercial Manager Frédéric Bouvier, J/LANCE 12’s captain. “We are participating in the event to prove that you can still win races with a pure cruiser-racer."

    This is the third J/112E they have campaigned, but J-LANCE 12, launched in March, is the first fitted with a “grand prix” package including a carbon fiber mast, fin (rather than bulb) keel and other race boat features. "We are trying new systems, which might be useful on future boats," explains Bouvier.

    The team has been highly successful racing on France's Atlantic coast, winning all they entered in 2017. On board J-LANCE 12 for the IRC Europeans is reigning Solitaire du Figaro winner and Volvo Ocean Race navigator- Nicolas Lunven.  For more IRC European Championship sailing information
     

    Chicago NOOD Regatta Preview
    (Chicago, IL)- The highly popular Helly Hansen Chicago NOOD Regatta is again being hosted by the amazing volunteers and club members at Chicago YC, with crews sailing on the fresh waters of Lake Michigan, with the spectacular Chicago city-front as their backdrop.

    The weather forecast is a bit sketchy for the weekend. However, it can change rapidly based on the crazy weather patterns the Midwest has been experiencing the last few weeks.  Today, it’s baseball-sized hail (75mm dia.), lightning, tornados, and tropical downpours, blowing “dogs off chains” type stuff.  Friday’s forecast is light easterlies, partly cloudy. Then a front passes through, producing ENE winds shifting ESE over the next two days blowing 15-20 kts with patchy rain and lots of cloudy.  Not exactly a “shorts & shades” type of weekend!

    Over the years, the regatta has ultimately evolved into one of the largest J/Boats regattas on the calendar anywhere in the world, with the Annapolis NOOD, perhaps being the largest.  The Chicago event includes one-design classes for J/70s, J/105s, J/109s, J/111s, and J/88s. In addition, there will be the North Sails Rally with ORR/PHRF divisions for a J/100, J/105, J/120, J/130, J/133, J/112E, and J/44. Of the 144 keelboats registered, 58 are J/Crews (40% of the fleet).

    The thirteen-boat J/70 class features four women’s skippers in their ranks, including the runner-up J/70 North American Corinthian team- Sarah Renz’s BERTEAU GROUP.  The other three are Molly Hayes’ BOMBORA, Amy Neill’s NITEMARE and Ava Wilson’s CONVERGENCE.

    The nine-boat J/105 class will again see most of the same boats that sailed the previous weekend in the COLORS Regatta.  Will Sam Powers’ GRYPHON repeat their amazing success?  Or, will the other two teams on that podium, Clark Pellett’s SEALARK and Jon Weglarz’s THE ASYLUM, exact revenge on the white wash from the previous weekend?

    With eight boats, the J/109s have a good turnout for the Chicago fleet, three more than last weekend at the COLORS Regatta.  Like their 105 colleagues, a similar scenario may play out.  Will Bob Evan’s GOAT RODEO maintain pace and put pressure on their fellow 109’ers?  Perhaps Jim Murray’s CALLISTO and Peter Priede’s FULL TILT will overcome their inconsistent performance and podium every race; both are capable of doing just that.

    As the COLORS Regatta goes, same for Chicago NOOD for the eight-boat J/88 class?  Time will tell.  Watch out for a battle between the top three boats from last weekend; Ben Marden’s BANTER, Andy Graff’s EXILE, and Tim Wade’s WINDSONG.

    At an even dozen boats, the Great Lakes J/111 Fleet has shown up in force.  The big question on everyone’s mind will be whether Jeff Davis’ SHAMROCK from Cleveland, OH can top their regatta-winning efforts at the J/111 Midwinters in St. Petersburg, FL earlier in the season.  Chasing them hard will be several teams that also sailed the weekend before in the COLORS Regatta; such as Rich Witzel’s ROWDY (2nd) and the trio of Brummel/ Henderson/ Mayer on KASHMIR (3rd).

    In the PHRF handicap world, there will be three-days of racing for the PHRF ToT Fleet of fifteen boats.  In the mix should be the two J/35s- Dan Leslie’s NOMATA and Rick Stage’s ALPHA PUPPY.

    The Saturday-only offshore race, the North Sails Rally- ORR handicap fleet, there are quite a few J/crews peppered amongst the twenty-two teams registered.  Hoping to repeat their first race win will be Sam Veilleux’s new J/112E MARY GAIL.  Chasing them hard will be Dave Hughes’ J/100 BARRACUSA, Mike Hettel’s J/105 GLOBAL NOMADS, Frank Giampoli’s J/120 JAHAZI, Tom Papoutsis’ J/133 RENEGADE, and Jay Butler’s J/44 CHEEP’N’DEEP II.  For more Helly Hansen Chicago NOOD Regatta sailing information
     

    New York YC 164th Annual Regatta Preview
    (Newport, RI)- The 164th New York YC Annual Regatta will feature a race around Conanicut Island on Friday, June 8, and then two days of buoy racing for the IRC classes, and point-to-point racing for the ORR & PHRF navigator classes. The weather forecast looks promising, with a classic setup for Friday’s Round Island, sunny, SW winds at 8-15 kts.  Then, a bit of rain, but with light southerly winds on Saturday, followed by sun but lightish easterlies swinging right all day on Sunday.

    The race track for Friday’s circumnavigation of Conanicut Island is just 19nm long. But, it delivers a full menu of tactical challenges, from the enigmatic tidal flows in the West and East Passages of Lower Narragansett Bay; the tricky ocean swells off Beavertail and the numerous geographically influenced windshifts, which are unique to each wind direction. It requires constant focus from the trimming and tactical teams and a good dose of local knowledge.

    This year, the regatta will award an overall trophy for the best-corrected time under the three handicap rules that will have more than one division in the race; including IRC, ORR, and PHRF.

    “We’re very excited to offer overall trophies for Friday’s Around-the-Island Race for the three biggest rating rules in use during the Annual Regatta,” said David Bush-Brown, the event chairperson. “With each boat sailing the same course, this is a rare opportunity for local family-based programs to go head-to-head with some of the top professional sailing teams in the United States.”

    While most of the yachts competing hail from within a day’s sail, there are a more than few road warriors willing to pull the rig, put their beloved yacht on a trailer, hitch it to a large truck and head out on the highway, all in the name of superlative sailing.

    “The New York Yacht Club puts on a great regatta,” says Tom Sutton of Houston, Texas, who will sail his J/109 LEADING EDGE in the Annual Regatta. “This is a sailing mecca as far as we are concerned. My crew loves coming up here.”

    Sutton and his team first competed in the Annual Regatta in 2015, towing their trusty J/35 from Galveston Bay to Newport. They haven’t missed a year since. This year, Sutton switched boats, bringing his J/109 north while leaving the J/35 at home for local events. The team’s summer campaign is broken into two parts, four regattas during the first half of the summer, including the Annual Regatta and July’s Race Week at Newport presented by Rolex, and then a pair of events in October on Western Long Island Sound, including the J/109 2018 North American Championship.

    “It’s really exciting for us,” says Sutton. “My wife and I, and my son, will stay here for two months. And then we’ll head back to Houston. Then we’ll come back [in October] for those two events, one at American Yacht Club and then the J/109 championship.”

    Competing against a fleet overflowing with local sailors is a challenge for any out-of-towner. But Sutton and his team have had more than their share of success at the Annual Regatta. Two years ago, they claimed overall honors in IRC for the Around the Island Race, beating 44 other yachts. Last summer, the Leading Edge crew took second in IRC 3 in the weekend portion of the Regatta.

    “We try to learn quickly,” he says with a chuckle. “We have a good navigator, really good crew. Most of these races have legs that are 1.5 or 1.25 miles long, so you do have to pay attention to the current.”

    Sailing in the IRC Division will be four J/109s, including Carl Olsson’s MORNING GLORY, Bill Sweetser’s RUSH, Albrecht Goethe’s HAMBURG, and Tom Sutton’s LEADING EDGE.  Twin J/122s will be going for class honors, Paul Milo’s ORION and Jack Gregg’s TARAHUMARA.  A pair of J/44s will be in the hunt as long-time veterans of the regatta, NYYC Vice Commodore Bill Ketcham’s MAXINE and Chris Lewis’ KENAI.

    In the ORR Navigator division will be Howie Hodgson’s J/160 TRUE and Bob Manchester’s J/120 VAMOOSE.  Sailing similar random-leg courses inside Narragansett Bay is the PHRF Navigator division.  Racing will be Steve Levy’s J/121 EAGLE, Doug Curtiss’ J/111 WICKED 2.0, Abhijeet Lele’s J/111 VARUNA, Brian Kiley’s J/109 GAMBIT, EC Helme’s J/92S SPIRIT, and Dan Stone’s J/80 HOT STREAK.   For more NYYC Annual Regatta sailing information
     

    Farallones Island Race Preview
    (San Francisco, CA)- “The Big One” of the season for the offshore racing crowd on San Francisco Bay is now upon us- the fabled Farallones Island Race- fully-crewed teams.  San Francisco YC in Belvedere is hosting the event for the eighty-one entries.  At this stage, it looks like the sailors will be treated to a classic, epic race, with 15-25 kts from the WNW on Saturday.  With the start on an ebb-tide, the outgoing flows through the gate and over the “Potato Patch” will produce enormous breaking waves against the big breeze, challenging the crews on their way out.  By 2:30pm, the tide switches and with it flowing back into the bay, the smoother water should make for an amazingly fast “planing mode” ride back into the Bay!

    A veritable navy of J/teams have entered this one-day, but very challenging race that starts just off Alcatraz Island, heads west through the Golden Gate Bridge, round the Farallones rocks, then back into the bay to the start/finish line.  Most boats generally finish by sunset, although in some years that has not been the case.  For the fast boats, it’s a “race to happy hour” at the yacht club bar!

    The J/crews range from the classic J/30s up to the magnificent J/44, and from the speedy J/88s up to the J/125 offshore machine.

    In the full-crewed division are five of the top J/120s in the Bay area that will be keeping everyone honest with the competitive crews, such as Barry Lewis’ CHANCE, Steve Madeira’s MR MAGOO, Timo Bruck’s TWIST, Ton Grennan’s KOOKABURRA, and Sean Mulvihill’s JAMANI.  In addition, Jim Goldberg’s notorious J/109 JUNKYARD DOG’ers will be loving the big slog in big waves out to the rocks, so will Reuben Rocci’s J/111 SWIFT NESS, and Rich Pipkin’s J/125 CAN’T TOUCH THIS.  Hoping for more benign conditions will be Tom Borgstrom’s J/92 HIJINKS, Kevin Mills’ J/36 DAWNS EARLY LIGHT, and the two J/30s entered, Tony Castruccio’s WIND SPEED and Jenny Thompson’s FRICTION LOSS.

    In the Doublehanded Division, two J/88’s will be hoping for planing mode on the return leg, Jim Hopp’s WHITE SHADOW and Chris Cartwright’s VENTUS. Another Doublehanded team will be Rick Leute’s J/44 ACEY DEUCY.  For Farallones Race sailing information and results  For Farallones Race event information at San Francisco YC
     

    J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    The first week of June for sailing around the world saw the extremes of weather, from perfect sunny days in Europe, to violent squalls laden with hail, torrential rain and gale force winds on Long Island Sound.

    Starting with Europe, we find the U.K. Women’s Open Keelboat Championship was hosted by the Hamble River Sailing Club for a mixed IRC handicap fleet that included a J/80, J/92, J/97, J/109, J/111, J/112E and J/122E.  Up in Skagen, Sweden, the Skagen Race had taken place with a J/111 having an amazing outcome.  In La Rochelle, France, the French J/80 Open Regatta was the third event to take place in the summer-long France J/80 Cup, hosted by Societe Regate Rochelaises.

    Down in the Mediterranean, the 151 Miglia Race- Trofeo Cetilar- saw some excellent performances from a J/112E, J/122, and J/111.

    Then, there were over a half-dozen J/70 related regattas all over Europe.  For starters, the BOSCH Spanish J/70 National Championship took place in Vigo, Spain, hosted by Real Club Nautico de Vigo; a precursor for the upcoming J/70 European Championship in the same place.  Similarly, the J/70 Southern Areas Championship were hosted by Royal Thames YC off their Cowes, England facility.

    The J/70 sailing leagues have taken off like a hurricane blanketing Europe.  The principal event was the SAILING Champions League- Semi-finals hosted by YC Costa Smeralda in Porto Cervo, Sardinia, Italy for a fleet of 22 sailing clubs.  Then, fifteen sailing clubs sailed the third event in the Swiss J/70 Sailing League in Romanshorn, Switzerland.  Eighteen sailing clubs were involved sailing their second event in the Norwegian J/70 Sailing League in Bodo, Norway.  In Russia, twenty-four sailing clubs participated in the Russian J/70 Sailing League- Premiere Division- sailing at the Konakovo River Club, NW of Moscow, Russia.  Over in Sweden, there were eighteen sailing clubs involved in the Swedish J/70 Sailing League racing off Ekero, Sweden near their capital of Stockholm.  Then, there was the J/70 Moscow Summer Series- sponsored by Ulysses Nardin- sailed on their “water stadium” just SW of Moscow.

    Over in the Americas, it was no less busy. For starters, there was the umpteenth J/30 North American Championship hosted by Cedar Point YC in Westport, CT on Long Island Sound. Up on Lake Ontario, the Susan Hood Trophy Race was hosted by the Port Credit YC, a 75nm course around Lake Ontario that included a J/33, J/35, J/105, J/109, J/120, and J/122- lots of silver won by this group! Also, out east, the stormy Cedar Point One-Design Regatta was hosted by Cedar Point YC in Westport, CT for one-design classes for J/70s, J/88s, J/30s, J/105s, and J/109s. Then, down at the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay, was the Southern Bay Race Week hosted by Hampton YC, with PHRF classes and J/24 one-design class. Out in the Midwest, it was the occasion for the Columbia YC’s COLORS Regatta, the season opener on the Chicago waterfront for five J/one design classes- J/70s, J/105s, J/88s, J/109s, J/111s.  In Detroit, Bayview YC held their annual Bayview One-Design Regatta for fleets of J/70s, J/35, and J/120s.

    Read on! The J/Community and Cruising section below has many entertaining stories and news about J/Sailors as well as cruising blogs about those who continue to enjoy the Caribbean and the South Pacific, staying warm while others are trying to stay warm up north.  Check them out!  More importantly, if you have more J/Regatta News, please email it or  upload onto our J/Boats Facebook pag  Below are the summaries.

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    Jun 8-10- Helly Hansen NOOD Regatta Chicago- Chicago, IL
    Jun 8-16- IRC European Championship- Cowes, England
    Jun 8-10- New York YC Annual Regatta- Newport, RI
    Jun 9-10- Australian J/24 Midwinter Championship- Cronulla, NSW, Australia
    Jun 9- Farallones Islands Race- Belvedere, CA
    Jun 9-16- J/70 European Championship- Vigo, Spain
    Jun 15-17- Cleveland Race Week- Cleveland, OH
    Jun 15- Newport to Bermuda Race- Newport, RI
    Jun 16-24- Kiel Week/ Kieler Woche- Kiel, Germany
    Jun 16-18- Women’s SAILING Champions League- Kiel, Germany
    Jun 16-17- Three Buoy Fiasco- Seattle, WA
    Jun 17-22- Block Island Race Week- Block Island, RI
    Jun 20-23- J/22 North American Championship- Wayzata, MN
    Jun 22-24- J/FEST Seattle- Seattle, WA
    Jun 22- RORC Morgan Cup Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    Jun 22-24- Long Beach Race Week- Long Beach, CA
    Jun 23-25- J/70 EURO CUP V- Riva del Garda, Italy
    Jun 28- Jul 1- Norwegian J/70 National Championship- Hanko, Norway
    Jun 29- Jul 1- New York YC One-Design Regatta- Newport, RI
    Jun 30- Vic-Maui International Yacht Race- Victoria, BC, Canada
    Jul 7-14- J/80 World Championship- Les Sables d’Olonne, France
    Jul 7- Round the Island Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    Jul 7-8- Sail Newport Regatta- Newport, RI

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

    J/Women Win Dubarry Women’s Open Keelboat Championship!
    (Hamble, England)- The 10th Dubarry Women's Open Keelboat Championship took place in the Solent on 2nd & 3rd of June 2018, hosted once again by the Hamble River Sailing Club.

    For the second year running twenty boats came to the start line, but they were bigger boats so a record number of 170 women sailors attended the 10th Anniversary event. As usual, the Friday night briefing contained a number of entertaining presentations. First was progress report on the "new" Maiden project. This was followed by Saskia Clark, tactician on the J/111 JOURNEYMAKER 11 for the weekend, detailing the trials and tribulations of her medal-winning Olympic campaigns. Josie Gliddon then bravely took on the responsibility of the weather forecast for the weekend. "There are no isobars anywhere in Europe,” she stated looking at the synoptic charts for the next two days. She then advised competitors, to don cheap sunglasses and look out of the boat for any sign of moving air pollution. This would give a clue to where the new wind would come from. Best guess from the East!!

    Kathy Smalley and her race team need not have worried. There were no foghorns in evidence overnight and as they approached the start area, a steady 14 knots from the South West, proved once again that the Solent does not necessarily need an isobar to have wind. As the Nobel Prize winner for Literature, Robert Allan Zimmerman, once said, "You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows!!”

    The RC Committee Boat hook was dropped near Royal Southern (4S) and with a windward mark of East Knoll (4H) proceedings got underway on time. In Class 1, the J/112E DAVANTI DREAM TEAM (Marie-Claude Heys and Becky Walford), the J/122E R&W (Christine Allen) and the J/111 JOURNEYMAKER II (Laura Dillon and Louise Makin) battled it out for the first spot. They finished in that order. In Class 2, the J/109 JYBE TALKIN (Chloe Slater and Cressida Robson) came in first with the J/80 WILDCAT III (Lucy Burn) second and the J/109 JOLLY JACK TAR (Laura Blagden) in third.

    The breeze stiffened slowly until, by Race 3, a good 20 knots was blowing against the ebb tide. There were a number of lessons learned about getting spinnakers down in plenty of time when approaching the leeward mark at speed. Even after the finish, it pays to remove the kite quickly. At the end of day one, Marie-Claude Heys/ Becky Walford’s J/112E DAVANTI DREAM TEAM took three 1st places in Class 1. Lucy Burn’s J/80 WILDCAT III was leading Josie Gliddon’s J/80 BOYSTEROUS in Class 2.

    Owing to the increase in numbers, the Saturday night “Frocks & Flip-Flops” party was moved to the Hamble Memorial Hall, which was suitably dressed and pom-pommed for the evening. The annual raffle raised over £1,000 for Breast Cancer Care and The Hamble Lifeboat. If there were a prize for partying, the ladies from Voodoo, Verity Rouse and the RORC U35 Team, would have won it by a nautical mile. They were still going strong when your correspondent had long since retired for the night!

    On Sunday morning, the River Hamble and the Solent were like glass. Not a ripple. The committee boat went on station at hamblewinterseries.com (4J) and waited. One by one, the yachts appeared and anchored. Not surprisingly, Voodoo appeared last but the AP saved her. Cheap sunglasses were now deployed in earnest, but to no avail. The Hamble River SC PRO, so calm in the wind on Saturday, now became twitchy, rushing here and there muttering to herself. "Relax Kathy,” an old wag on the boat said, "There's no rush to make a cock up.”  Those crews who had gone to bed early now began to show the energy they had saved. The ladies on the J/109 JOLLY JACK TAR started things off with a rendition of “YMCA”!! But, they were soon out gunned by Thunderbird with the whole crew doing “the Macarena” in perfect unison, whilst motoring in a circle. BGT, auditions next, I think.

    Eventually, a light light breeze from just east of south crept towards the fleet. Slowly it built to 6 knots from the SE and a windward mark was dropped 0.5nm to windward. The line was set and all was well for day two racing. All that is, apart from Uproar, Mellissa Chapman, who found herself in the middle of the start line unable to retrieve her anchor. Undeterred Class 1 started managing to avoid the bright orange Impala. Gradually, the breeze built and for the second race the windward mark went out to 0.9nm. The racing was much closer in the lighter conditions with bunched groups rounding the leeward mark.

    In Class 1, the J/112E DAVANTI DREAM TEAM scored two more bullets, to take the class.  But, they were less comfortable bullets than the day before. The J/122 R&W with three-second places came second overall with the defending champions, the J/111 JOURNEYMAKER II in third. In Class 2, the J/80 WILD CAT III with 8 points, beat the J/80 BOYSTEROUS with 9 points.

    Marie-Claude and Becky on their J/112E DAVANTI DREAM TEAM drew up the crew relatively late in the day; five weeks before racing, with a wide range of experience from virtual novices to very experienced management. With an age span of 20 to 60, the team comprised of four J/Boat owners, two youth from the RYA keelboat squad, and local sailors. Competition was tough, namely, the very well sailed J/122 R&W with Lucy McGregor doing tactics, and Louise Makin’s J/111 JourneyMaker run by Laura Dillon, and helped by Olympic gold medalist Saskia Clark!

    Marie-Claude said, “I am proud of our result, and very happy to have finally won the event after finishing in second place five times! We had more wind than expected, and on Saturday, the Hamble River SC PRO Kathy Smalley managed to give us three races with different courses, as the breeze built to reach 15 kts. On Sunday, we had to tie on to a buoy for a couple of hours waiting for the breeze to kick in, and when it did Kathy (the HRSC PRO) managed to send us on two good windward-leeward courses. A beautiful weekend in champagne sailing conditions, in great company and a win. I could not be happier!”

    J/112E DAVANTI TYRES has an excellent race record since her delivery last summer, winning her class at Round the Island, Dartmouth, two J-Cups, and the Warsash Spring Series.

    Becky commented, “With many of the crew being experienced J/Boat sailors it was easy to settle into the J/112E. This J is a pleasure to sail, being stable and forgiving. However, she is also very rewarding, as working the boat with fine adjustments meant we got the best out of her. Our competition included Olympians and previous WOKC winners, which meant we had our work cut out right from the off. The 5 races were held in perfect condition of bright sunshine with 8 to 15kts of breeze and bright sunshine. Having been chief bridesmaid on too many occasions it was great to finally win the 10th Dubarry Open Keelboat championships. Thank you to all involved!”  Sailing photo credits- Trevor Pountain/ Yachts & Yachting  Sailing video highlights of Dubarry Women’s Open Keelboat Championship  For more Dubarry Women’s Open Keelboat Championship sailing information  For more information about the J/112E sport cruiser
     

    Circolo Della Vela Bari Top AUDI SAILING Champions League Qualifier
    (Porto Cervo, Sardinia, Italy)- Teams from 22 clubs representing 13 nations were battling over four intense days of competition at Semifinal 1 of SAILING Champions League (SCL) in Porto Cervo for a ticket to the SAILING Champions League Final in St. Moritz coming up at the end of August.

    The first 14 sailing clubs qualified in Sardinia for the final event in Switzerland. The Italian yacht club, Circolo Della Vela Bari, won the opening round organized by Yacht Club Costa Smeralda with the support of title sponsor AUDI, after a commanding performance in Sardinia. In the beginning of August, 16 other sailing clubs qualify at Semifinal 2 in St. Petersburg, Russia, to complete the list of 32 participants besides host club Segel-Club St. Moritz and SCL Champion Yacht Club Costa Smeralda.

    Day One- Danish Women’s Team First Leader
    Perfect weather conditions welcomed the sailors competing on the first day. The first of two semifinal legs got underway with a mild Mistral wind between 9 and 12 knots; ideal conditions for the YCCS fleet of J/70s. Heading the provisional classification was the all-women’s team from the Royal Danish Yacht Club followed by the Finns of AAS and Germany's SMCU.

    Participating crews have travelled to Porto Cervo from every corner of Europe: Slovenia is represented for the first time by JK Aurora, while the largest contingent hails from Nordic and Central European countries.

    Each flight consists of a full round of short windward-leeward races, with each leg approximately a third of a mile and teams alternating on board the J/70 fleet. Smooth organization allows crew changes to take place in just 3-4 minutes, allowing flights to depart in quick succession.

    During the Welcome Cocktail on the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda terrace, YCCS Commodore Riccardo Bonadeo declared, "We are delighted to welcome the SAILING Champions League back to Porto Cervo, approximately 100 sailors from across Europe began racing today in excellent weather conditions with a formula that allows yacht clubs to compete in a fun way and on an equal footing. On behalf of the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, I would like to thank our long-term partner AUDI for their support over the past 11 years. Fair winds to all the participants!"

    Day Two- New Leaders Take Control
    Competitors and the Race Committee had a long and productive day at sea. No less than five flights were concluded, with a total of 15 races run, shaking up the top of the leaderboard. The Austrians of Yacht Club Bregenz now sat in the lead with consistently good performances, followed just one point behind by Circolo Della Vela Bari on level points with the Germans of SMCU.

    The day began at 9 a.m. with the usual briefing in Piazza Azzurra, and the first races started on time at 10 a.m. with northerly winds of about 10 knots, which lessened and rotated eastward throughout the day. After two stoppages for lack of breeze, in the late afternoon a southeasterly breeze picked up allowing two more flights to be completed.

    "We had great conditions here and we managed to sail consistently well,” said Jodok Küng of Yacht Club Bregenz. "The racing is pretty tight, all the clubs are performing at a really high level, so we don't want to overrate our leading position. We want to qualify for the SAILING Champions League Final in St. Moritz. So, our plan for the next few days is not to think too much, to sail well and in the end we will get a result."

    Simone Ferrarese, skipper of Circolo Della Vela Bari, commented, "Thanks to three bullets today we were able to recover from yesterday's OCS! We hope to continue like that over the coming days and end up with a good result. I'd like to thank my team mates who sailed really well, the wind was very shifty and the support on tactics by Valerio Galati, our mainsail trimmer and my crew in the 49er Olympic campaign, was fundamental to our success.”

    The teams concluded the day with the social highlight of the competition, a team barbecue on the terrace of the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda.

    Day Three- Italians Take Lead
    The third day saw the team representing Circolo Della Vela Bari move to the top of the classification, followed by the Austrians of the Yacht Club Bregenz. Just four flights remained to be held in the final day of the event.

    The wind filled in at around 11 a.m. and the first race got underway soon after, accompanied by an easterly wind of approximately 6 knots which progressively built up to 10 knots and moved to south-easterly. The races took place in quick succession and were broadcast in live streaming on the SAILING Champions League YouTube channel.

    Once again, the race course was not easy to read, with shifty wind and unexpected holes in the breeze. In such a closely ranked fleet, it was important to make as few mistakes as possible. Many penalties- a 360° turn- were imposed by the umpires on the tightly-bunched fleet.

    The team from Circolo Della Vela Bari posted four 1sts, one 2nd and one 5th to lead the provisional standings just one point ahead of yesterday's leaders, the Austrians of the Yacht Club Bregenz. The French team representing Club de Voile St. Aubin Elbeuf moved up to third place at the expense of the German team of Segel-und Motorboot Club Überlingen.

    Simone Ferrarese, skipper of CVB, said, "It was an excellent day and the crew worked especially well, we expected more wind, but luckily we managed to perform well in today's conditions. We are all very close, tomorrow is the decisive day! The forecast gives more wind and we will see who makes it in the end."

    Cédric Chateau, skipper of Club de Voile St. Aubin Elbeuf, commented, "We were able to manage the day well, avoiding big mistakes and especially those penalties that had initially brought our scores down. We are very close to our opponents and, generally, very pleased with the day."

    Day Four- Finale, Italians Win!
    Excellent starting skills and clear-headed tactical racing delivered victory for the crew representing Circolo Della Vela Bari (CVB), one of two Italian teams competing on the sparkling waters of the Costa Smeralda. Simone Ferrarese’s team went into the final day just in front of Austrian rivals Yacht Club Bregenz, with Club de Voile Saint-Aubin Elbeuf also in contention. However, neither the Austrians nor French could match the blinding consistency of the CVB crew, who won all three of their races on the final day to win the 22-team contest with a race to spare.

    Ferrarese was delighted to win in such dominant fashion, commenting that, “We had an amazing day today. It’s great to come out with a race victory and it’s fantastic to win in Italian waters! We love Porto Cervo and we love this event. It was tough until the end, especially in our last race to keep our eyes on the French team from Club de Voile Saint-Aubin Elbeuf, who was our direct rival. Thanks to my crew, they did an amazing job!”

    Although they may not have won in Porto Cervo, the Austrians were still very satisfied with second overall. Compared with the Mediterranean heat of Northern Sardinia, skipper Max Trippolt will perhaps enjoy the cooler climes of Switzerland in just under three months from now. “Sailing so many races in four days, the sun in Sardinia kills your brain, and keeping the concentration up is not easy at all! So, we’re very happy to have qualified for the SAILING Champions League Final. But the competition is going to be even harder in St. Moritz, when the best clubs from the semifinals come together. We’ll give our best and see what’s possible.”

    Aside from winning the event, the other battle in the middle of the fleet was to secure one of the 14 places available for the final in St. Moritz. APCC Nantes sailed well in their final heat to take second place behind the winners from CVB, the French doing enough to secure qualification for Switzerland. Last of the qualifiers was Jachtclub Scheveningen from the Netherlands, with their Dutch compatriots WSV Giesbeek finishing just one place and three points behind, but meaning they just missed out on a ticket to St Moritz.

    The Yacht Club Costa Smeralda (YCCS) ran an exemplary regatta, proving why this venue continues to be one of the clearest choices for hosting world-class sailing contests. YCCS Commodore, Riccardo Bonadeo, commented, “the club became famous for hosting Maxi yachts but we also want to welcome the young sailors to compete at events like SAILING Champions League. We are happy that this new challenge for the club is achieving great results for sailing. We make every effort to create the same spirit of sport for young people in the smaller boats – because this is the future of our sport.”

    The YCCS regatta was the first of two semifinals, with the second semifinal due to be hosted by St. Petersburg Yacht Club in Russia from August 3rd to 6th, just a few weeks before the 2018 Final which will be hosted for the first time by Segel-Club St. Moritz, high up in the Swiss Alps from August 30th to September 2nd.

    Live broadcasting by SAP
    Did you miss the races of SAILING Champions League? Just visit http://www.sapsailing.com and click through the SAP Sailing Analytics for replays of all races and different and interesting statistics about the action on water.

    The qualified clubs for the Final in St. Moritz are:

    1     Italy- Circolo Della Vela Bari- Bari, Italy
    2     Austria- Yacht Club Bregenz- Bregenz, Austria
    3     France- Club de Voile Saint-Aubin Elbeuf- Saint-Aubin Elbeuf, France
    4     Switzerland- Regattaclub Bodensee- St. Gallen, Switzerland
    5     Germany- Segel-und Motorboot Club Überlingen- Überlingen, Germany
    6     Monaco- Yacht Club Monaco- Monte Carlo, Monaco
    7     Switzerland- Regattaclub Oberhofen- Oberhofen, Switzerland
    8     Denmark- Kongelig Dansk Yachtklub- Copenhagen, Denmark
    9     Italy- Società Canottieri Garda Salò- Salò, Italy
    10     Finland- Åländska Segelsällskapet- Åland Islands, Finland
    11     Germany- Wassersportverein Hemelingen- Bremen, Germany
    12     Sweden- Cape Crow Yacht Club- Gothenburg, Sweden
    13     France- APCC Nantes- Nantes, France
    14     Netherlands- Jachtclub Scheveningen- The Hague, Netherlands

    Sailing photo credits- SCL/Lars Wehrmann   SAILING Champions League highlights video on Facebook   For more SAILING Champions League regatta information
     

    A Wild J/30 North American Championship
    WILDCAT Wins Storm-tossed Series
    (Westport, CT)- For the 2018 edition of the J/30 North American Championship, it will go down as one of the wildest events on record in the long history of the class that started back in 1983.  Nine boats braved the weekend event hosted by Cedar Point Yacht Club in Westport, CT.  The fleet enjoyed somewhat benign conditions on Saturday, but the tables turned quite dramatically on Sunday as a menacing front swung through producing big breezes, rain, and hail just west of the race course area.

    After eight races, Russ Atkinson’s J/30 WILDCAT won the event based on their blistering record on the first day, posting a 1-2-1-1 on Saturday followed by a 2-2-4-2 in the big breeze Sunday to take the event with 11 pts net (after a discard).  The balance of the podium was determined by a thrilling tie-breaker between Steve Buzbee’s famously fast BLUE MEANIE and Carl Sherter’s equally notorious FAT CITY; each team finished with 16 pts net, the countback going in favor to Buzbee’s BLUE MEANIE to take the silver.  The balance of the top five included Seth Shepard IV’s DOW JONES in 4th and Sumner Parker’s BLUE JACKET in 5th.  Sailing photo credits- Daniel Forster For more J/30 North American Championship sailing information
     

    Araujo Crowned BOSCH Spanish J/70 Champion!
    (Vigo, Spain)- The Real Club Nautico de Vigo has been preparing for the 2018 edition of the J/70 European Championship for months.  As part of their preparation and training for their club members and Race Committee volunteers, they hosted the Vigo J/70 Winter & Spring Series for two dozen boats.  In addition, as the penultimate test of their team, they also hosted this year’s BOSCH Spanish J/70 Nationals as the precursor-training program for both Spanish crews as well as their European visitors wishing to learn more about the waters off Vigo.

    Thirty-one teams participated in the BOSCH Spanish J/70 Nationals and five races were run over the weekend event.  The event had tremendous support from Galician institutions, including the Concello de Vigo, the Diputación de Pontevedra, the Port of Vigo, and the Xunta de Galicia.

    In the end, it was Gonzalo Araujo and his team from LAGUARDIA & MOREIRA-LAUFEN was crowned the champions after posting a very consistent scoreline of 2-1-8-7-5 for 23 pts total.  It was big win for the local favorites as they were carrying the flag for the host- Real Club Nautico de Vigo!

    Taking the silver was the duo of Alfredo Gonzalez and Federico Morales on MARINA RUBICON, sailing for the Real Club Nautico de Arrecife.  They started fast, but faded in the end, recording a tally of 1-2-10-6-7 for 26 pts.

    Sitting just one point lower to take the bronze was the two-time J/80 World Champion, Jose Maria “Pichu” Torcida on NOTICIA, posting the most consistent scores of 6-7-6-4-4 for 27 pts.  His team from Real Club Maritimo de Santander has been a force in the Spanish J/80 class for over a decade and has now taken to the J/70 class like ducks to water.  Notably, they took 2nd in the blustery, windy 2017 J/70 Europeans sailed on the Solent in the United Kingdom.  They will be a force to be reckoned with in the J/70 Europeans next week!

    Rounding out the top five were Luis Bugallo Arriola’s MARNATURA in 4th (also a RCN Vigo team) and the top Russian crew- Denis Cherevatenko’s JOYFUL.  Notably, the Russians won the last race, had three podium finishes, and were 2nd in the Corinthians Division- huge progress since last year!  Sailing Photo Credits: Angel Touròn   Watch the nice BOSCH Spanish J/70 Nationals sailing video highlights on Facebook  For more BOSCH Spanish J/70 National Championship sailing information
     

    J/112E Wins Class @ 151 Miglia Race- Trofeo Cetilar!
    (Pisa, Italy)- The 9th 151 Miglia Race- Trofeo Cetilar- has been described as a new, true classic, by it’s regatta organizers- a Committee formed by YC Punta Ala, YC Maritime Republic of Pisa and YC Livorno.

    According to their race circular, “it’s a race open to all, designed to enhance the strategic qualities of the participating crews.  But also, and above all, to experience emotions that only passion, sport and the sea can generate.  A regatta designed by sailors, for sailors, which brings with it all the power of the sea and the wind.

    The race starts in the waters between Livorno and Marina di Pisa, then round the famous Giraglia Rock and navigate through the islands of the Tuscan Archipelago. A route with two choices for courses around the islands, perfect for those who have not yet experienced a great race, and at the same time, intriguing and stimulating for all the experts of longer offshore navigations.  Then, finish off the point in Punta Ala.

    At the end of the regatta, the final appointment, from 2000 hrs on Saturday 2nd June, was the magnificent Yacht Club Punta Ala Dinner Party, a magnificent closing event that has no equal, made by protagonists for the protagonists, who each year are colored with smiles and enthusiasm!”  Lovely hyperbole, isn’t it?  But, it’s true, according to the sailors who’ve done the race over the years. It may be the awards ceremony/ dinner in Punta Ala that keeps them coming back- a concert, fireworks, dinner on the lawn overlooking the water, what’s not to love about it?!

    There were a half-dozen J/Teams that sailed the event, loving every minute of it, some more than others.

    In the IRC Class of sixty-eight boats, it was the breathtaking performance of a “sport cruiser”, the J/112E JACARE that astounded the cognoscenti of Italian racers.  Sailed by her owner Sabrina Chibbaro and friend Dario Badalamenti, they not only won IRC 2 Class by a comfortable margin, but also took 5th IRC Overall in the race.

    According to Sabrina, “as our first serious race, last weekend we took part to one of the most popular coastal races in Italy, the 151 Miglia.  We were first in IRC 2 and fifth IRC overall. We fought hard with the JPK 10.80 with the Russian crew that won the Rolex Middle Sea Race! But, eventually, we arrived 1 hour before them to win easily.  It was very exciting for us! Many people came to see the boat at the dock, they couldn’t believe a ‘sport cruiser” won!”

    In addition to their outstanding performance, there was an ORC Class with 129 boats racing.  In ORC 1 Class, the J/122 VAI MO sailed by Vincenzo de Falco took 6th in class and 19th ORC Overall.  And, in the ORC Doublehanded Class, the famous J/111 J-STORM, with brothers Guido & Enrico Tabellini from Club Nautico Varrazze aboard, took 4th in DH Class, 29th Overall against all full-crewed boats!   Follow the 151 Miglia- Trofeo Cetilar on Facebook here  For more 151 Miglia Race- Trofeo Cetilar sailing information
     

    PHAN Flies @ J/70 Southern Area Championship
    (Cowes, Isle of Wight, England)- The J/70 Southern Area Championships, hosted by the Royal Thames Yacht Club, attracted nineteen J/70 teams for two days of thrilling racing in sparkling early summer weather. Seven races were held in classic Solent sea breeze conditions, with the wind speed piping up to a glorious 18 knots in bright sunshine. Jeremy Thorp's Phan (RsrnYC) was the overall winner, scoring four race wins, and discarded a fifth to win the regatta by a considerable margin. John Greenland's JDog (RTYC) was runner up, and Patrick Liardet's Cosmic (RSrnYC) was third.

    Eight teams scored podium race scores including; Clive Bush's Darcey (CYC), Fiona Hampshire's Elizabeth (RTYC), Ossie Stewart's Alfie (RORC), Andrew Barraclough's Jenga8, Doug Struth's DSP (RsrnYC), and David McLeman's Offbeat (RsrnYC).

    “This is our first regatta since the 2017 Worlds, we did a lot of testing with the current world champion, Peter Duncan, and we knew at the worlds we are quick, but things didn't go terribly well for us there. For the Southern Area Championships things just seemed to go right for us, and when it does, that gives you so much more time to think things through. Two of the crew were racing for the first time, and we had perfect conditions to work up the team, and once you are in front, life is much easier. Phan will not be going to the J/70 European Championships, as we do not have time to compete there and to qualify for the 2019 World Championships. However, Phan will be racing at the J/70 National Championships next month,” commented Jeremy Thorp.

    Having chartered one of the J/70s owned and race prepared by the Royal Thames Yacht Club, John Greenland's JDog was racing in the J/70 Class for the first time. Greenland has tasted success in numerous keelboat events, representing the Royal Thames, but the J/70 is a new concept for him. Greenland's Corinthian team recovered from a poor start to post 1-2-2 on the last day, taking second for the regatta, just two points ahead of Patrick Liardet's Cosmic.

    “As the results show, we didn't start too well, but as we came accustomed to the boat and spent time on the water, our performance and results improved. It was great to win a race, and we should have won the last, but we lost it on the very last run. Performing well on the race course is always important, but it is also nice to enjoy the social side of sailing, and there is a great crowd in the J/70 Class,” commented John Greenland.

    The next event for the 2018 J/70 UK Class will be the J/70 European Championships, in Vigo, Spain 12-16 June. 12 British teams will be part of the 78-boat fleet.

    Round Five of the 2018 J/70 UK 2018 Grand Slam Series will be the J/70 National Championships, organized by the Royal Southern Yacht Club,  20-22 July.  Full results here.   For more information about the J/70 UK Class   Also via Facebook here.
     

    J/Navy Sweeps Podium @ Susan Hood Trophy Race
    (Port Credit, Ontario)- What an amazing start to the offshore racing season on Lake Ontario. This year’s Susan Hood Trophy Race left everyone on the course exhausted from a continuous wind throughout the night and into the morning. This year’s race will go down as one of the fastest overall SHTR in history.

    The course this year was the reverse of recent years.  The 75nm course started at Port Credit Yacht Club, going straight SSE across Lake Ontario to the Niagara Mark on the New York shoreline, then westerly to the Burlington Weather mark on the NY/ONT border, and then back to PCYC on an ENE course to the finish.

    From the start there was a mix of spinnakers and close reach sails going across the lake to the Niagara R2 mark with some of the lead boats topping over 14 knots boat speed. At Niagara, there was a quick douse of the spinnaker and a close reach all the way to the Burlington Mark where winds held, for the most part, over 13 kts. The Burlington Hole seemed to be feared by all racers after rounding Niagara, because it has become a part of this race.  The final leg from Burlington to Port Credit Yacht Club was dead upwind and held steady throughout most of the day making for an unusual finish that didn’t involve drifting around the turning mark. Without any rain and cool but not cold temperatures, this year’s Susan Hood Trophy Race was one to remember. One memory may be the fast moving freighter heading south just inside the Niagara weather mark, sounding it’s horn and causing more than a few boats to detour from course.

    With most boats riding the course at top speed and rail in the water, special congratulations to all our Solo Division participants. This year’s winner of the “Rigging Shoppe Trophy” for overall Solo division is LIVE WIRE, the J/109 skippered by Kim Pillar from PCYC.

    Since 1955, fully crewed yachts have been taking the challenge of this spring offshore race- the Susan Hood Trophy Race. The Susan Hood has always been treated as a great race to shake down your boat and crew and start the summer sailing season.

    The 2018 Susan Hood Trophy Race presented by driveHG.ca was run by the Port Credit Yacht Club and started on Friday, June 1, 2018 at PCYC. Typically, boats are back at the PCYC bar during the afternoon of the following day. And, for sure, this year that was the case!  Here was the breakdown by the various divisions.

    In the IRC-FS-FC1 Class, it was the J/122 HOOLIGAN skippered by Bruce Pierce that took 3rd place, just 10 minutes corrected time off from winning!

    There was a huge PHRF ToT division.  In the PHRF-FS-SH (solo), as mentioned above, it was the J/109 LIVEWIRE sailed by Kim Piller that won by 15 minutes on corrected time.

    In the PHRF-FS-FC1 Class, taking 2nd was the J/120 THE CAT CAME BACK sailed by Graham Toms, and 3rd was the J/120 RED LEAF sailed by Matt Emerson.

    The PHRF-FS-FC2 Class had three great performances.  Taking the silver was the J/35 SHORTHANDED helmed by Mike Pietz. Third was the J/109 LIVELY guided by a previous race-winner- Murray Gainer- just 4 seconds back!!  As if that was not close enough, in 5th place was the J/109 CARPE VENTUS sailed by Denys Jones only   1-minute further back!! The spread was basically a slow tack, slow chute set, or slow spinnaker takedown from 1st to 5th place!  Ouch!

    Sweeping the PHRF-FS-FC4 Class were all J/crews.  1st was the J/105 CASUAL ELEGANCE (Geoff Clarke), 2nd was J/33 WEE BEASTIE III (Sean Matthews) just 1 minute back, and 3rd was J/105 ANOTHER HAZARD (Peter Wolniak) only another 5 minutes back!  Fast, tight race for these three boats!  Follow the LOOR (Lake Ontario Offshore Racing) events on Facebook here  For the Susan Hood Trophy Race full sailing results  For more LOOR Susan Hood Trophy Race sailing information
     

    Blustery, Storm-tossed Cedar Point OD Regatta
    FUN for J/Crews in 70s, 30s, 109s, 105s, 88s!
    (Westport, CT)- The 2018th edition of Cedar Point YC’s annual One Design Regatta this past weekend may well be remembered forever for the most amazing, spectacular storm cloud/ squall that formed off to the west in Long Island Sound and slowly made its way east to envelope the fleet off Westport on Saturday afternoon.

    More than 100 boats took off from the harbor Saturday morning and raced on the Long Island Sound for one of the biggest regattas in the club’s history. Organizers say over 500 sailors were out racing for the day.  Of the seventy-one keelboats participating in the regatta, fifty-eight were J/teams (82% of the regatta) sailing in one-design classes for J/70s, J/88s, J/30s, J/105s, and J/109s.

    According to J/88 WINGS owner, Mike Bruno, “it was a crazy regatta. We had six 88’s signed up.  Iris Vogel’s DEVIATION transmission blew on their delivery up Long Island Sound and could not make it and Laura Weyler’s HIJINKS was a no-show.

    Saturday’s race 1 was very light air.  Then, the second race was sent off in a rapidly approaching squall... two boats would not race.  We did, as did ALBONDIGAS, and we won an insane race with squalls, thunder, three lightning strikes and close to zero visibility in torrential rain...then almost no breeze after the squall!

    Sunday was incredibly challenging. Big breeze and very big and steep waves. Elizabeth Barry’s ESCAPE were unhappy with the RC PRO decision to sail the second race Saturday with an impending squall, so retired from racing on Saturday to protect their brand new sails.  However, with more heavy winds on Sunday, they decided not to race at all.

    We sailed ourselves and kept it all together for the three races on Sunday, deciding not to sail the last race.  Ken & Drew Hall toughed it out and took the win in the last race to secure the silver on the podium.  Third was Al Minella’s ALBONDIGAS with 11 pts.”

    In the J/105 class, it was Joe Scarpulla’s TRIFECTA that sailed all aces & deuces to win with 6 pts net. Second was the class veteran Duncan Hennes and Za & Lib Jelliffe on ARETE with 8 pts net. Third was the duo of Harald Edegran & Jeremy Henderson on CONUNDRUM with 11 pts net.

    The huge eighteen-boat J/109 class saw one of the few, if any, complete and utter whitewashes of a fleet ever in the history of the class.  When one considers the high-level of talent and competition in the class, David Rosow’s team on LOKI managed what few crews ever accomplish, six straight bullets to win with just 5 pts net in a six race series!  Was that a spanking, schooling?  Call it what you wish, heads were spinning after the regatta; needless to say, it was a Popeye-like case of breaking out the can of spinach “whup-ass” and decimating the fleet.  Behind them, it was a case of survival of the fittest, as the rest of the top five was defined by a spread of only five points!  Taking the silver was Carl Olsson’s MORNING GLORY with 20 pts. net.  Then, third and fourth was determined by a tie-breaker on 22 pts net, with the countback going to Bengt & Marie Johansson’s ZIG ZAG over Bill Sweetser’s famous RUSH team.  Just two points back in fifth place was Dan Corcoran’s STRIDER.

    The J/70s had a supremely talented fleet amongst the eighteen boats that participated over the weekend. Loving the big breezes and big waves, the J/70 sailors were ecstatic to see “planing mode” become a feature of the weekend. Not surprisingly, perhaps the fastest J/70 sailor in the world downwind- Brian Keane’s SAVASANA- reveled in the conditions and won the last two races to win the regatta on a tie-breaker at 6 pt apiece over a J/70 World Champion- Joel Ronning’s accomplished crew on CATAPULT. Insanely, they shared identical records- two 1sts, two 2nds! Third was a Davis Island Winter Series Champion, John & Molly Baxter’s TEAM VINEYARD VINES with 15 pts.  The balance of the top five saw the Corinthians Division winner- Andrew & Melissa Fisher’s BUTTON FLY- take 4th overall on a tie-breaker, again, at 17 pts each over Josh Goldman’s BUILDING A.  Second in Corinthians division was Brian Elliot’s B-SQUARED and third was Trevor Roach’s SEMI-CHARMED.  Follow the Cedar Point YC’s Facebook page here  For more Cedar Point One-Design Regatta sailing information
     

    Revolutionary Swiss J/70 Sailing League Grows Faster
    (Romanshorn, Switzerland)- The second round of the Swiss Sailing Promotion League took place from June 2nd to 3rd off Romanshorn.  The event brought together sailing clubs from all four corners of Switzerland.  In fact, the newly launched “third” sailing league also created more ties among the sailors from across the country. The teams come from Lake Maggiore, Lago di Lugano, Lake Geneva, Lake Neuchâtel, Lake Lucerne, Lake Hallwil, Lake Zurich, Lake Constance and from Basel, where the Basel sailing club trains on the Rhine River.  In total, Switzerland now has three levels of participation in their leagues for 12 sailing clubs each, bringing the total participation to 36 clubs in the Swiss Alps!

    For this particular event, by far the most popular crew was the local junior team from the YC Romanshorn. Junior captain and skipper Lara Heuberger was sailing with the youngest crew at the regatta- Rashad Bisseger (16 yrs old), Julian Egli (16 yrs old), Finn Josat (14 yrs old) and Leonie Fink (15 yrs old). The YC Romanshorn deliberately renounced its starting position in the highest Challenge League to give the youngsters a chance to build their team and encourage youth participation in the club. The season's goal is to participate in the Swiss Sailing League Youth Cup in the autumn at the National Youth Sport Center Tenero on Lake Maggiore.

    An important feature for all Swiss J/70 Sailing League regattas has been the YC Romanshorn innovation - the RoboBojen (RoboBuoy). These buoys move independently and hold their position by means of a satellite navigation (GPS) based control- an Android-base app on a mobile phone controls the entire race course. This makes course planning quicker and more accurate, and the laborious and labor-intensive anchoring of buoys in very deep waters is eliminated- Swiss lakes, like other mountain lakes in Chile can reach 1,000 ft-plus! A “green” solution instead of using thousands of feet of twine and rocks!

    As for the racing, unbeaten with four race wins, the team of the Circolo Velico Lago di Lugano (Sacha de Micheli, Andrea Rossi, Cesare de Marchi and Matteo Colombo) took the victory in the second round of the Swiss Sailing Promotion League in Romanshorn. With this victory, Lugano also moves up to second place on the series leaderboard.

    After a wonderful training day on Friday with nice wind conditions, Saturday was a disappointment. Just two races were sailed in light winds. Lugano laid their foundation stone for success with a first race win. The win in the second race was taken by the YC Tivoli Lucerne, which finished second in the end. After that, the circulating winds did not allow any more racing for the day- swimming was required!

    At Sunday’s morning briefing, the wish for wind was fulfilled- somewhat.  A nice morning breeze blew across the lake. However, the wind disappeared during the first starting sequence and the subsequent waiting demanded the patience of the sailors. At 1230pm the west wind finally appeared! With steady 6-10 kt breeze, the Romanshorn PRO was able to quickly dash off 6 races (3 flights).

    The sailors from Lago di Lugano decided win all their races and had a clear lead for themselves. The competition had nothing to overcome the speed of the Luganoans!

    The Lucerne Yacht Club sailed a consistent series in the top 3 and was unchallenged for second place. Behind them in third was the SC Oberer Zürichsee skippered by Christa Kuster.  For more Swiss J/70 Sailing League information
     

    Florø Leads Norway J/70 Sailing League 1st Division
    (Bodo, Norway)- "We had a good start, tried to sail easily and we used our routine," says Frode Stavang, skipper of the Florø team, that won the series opener in the Norwegian Sailing League 1st Division.

    Frode Stavang, Even Onstad, Kjetil Karstensen Innerhus and Vegard Reksten Årebrot comprised the team for Florø Seilforening. They were fast, sailing “lights out” and winning five of seven races quite handily! And, took seconds in the other two races!

    "We were a bit too early at the start in one of the races and had to go back to restart. But, because we were blocked by boats on both sides of us, we did not get turned around immediately, and eventually ended up over a hundred meters behind the others. But, still we managed to sail ourselves back into second place!” commented Stavang.  "We tried to sail calmly and confidently, and after two seasons in the elite series we have worked up a certain routine that works.”

    Florø Seilforening retired from the elite series after the end of the 2017 season. But, after the first round in the 1st Division they have no intention of staying in the 1st Division. Stavang believes that the level is a notch lower in the 1st division than in the elite series.

    "Now that we have sailed a round in the 1st Division, we have already set ourselves the goal that we will be fighting to be the top four to qualify for the Elite Series next year! We should have a good chance,” said Stavang.

    The biggest challenges to the Florø team were made from Bodø Seilforening, sailing in their home waters helped them, taking 2nd place for the regatta. Then, following in third position was the Ålesund Seilforening.  For more Norwegian J/70 Sailing League information
     

    ZID Art Team Leads Russia J/70 Sailing League- Premiere Division
    (Konakovo (Moscow), Russia)- The third act of the Russian J/70 Sailing League- Premiere Division took place at the beautiful Konakovo River Club, northwest of Moscow.  The sixteen teams were treated to a wide variety of winds over the three-day weekend, from a complete glass-out at times to over 20 kts in full-on planing mode conditions!

    After a total of forty-two races, so each team had 18 or 19 races, it was the ZID Art Sailing Team skippered Zoran Paunovich that won by a total of 13.6 points over a top woman skipper- Natalia Kravets- sailing for the MATROYSHKA Team.

    Day 1- Perfect Sunny Start!
    It was a long first day of racing for the sixteen teams.  The regatta PRO managed to run twelve races, at least 5 to 6 for each team.  The wind started off at a steady 6 kts and continued to strengthen into the high teens by late afternoon.  No question the crews were exhausted despite having the ability to relax and refresh between each sequence of races.

    The sailors will remember the third race since ALL boats were called over the line in a massive false start! Apparently, everyone's nerves were strained to the limit!

    Leading at the end of the day was the GRANIT-INVEST Team skippered by Albert Gorkunov. Just one point back was the ZID Art Sailing team skippered by Zoran Paunovich, and laying in third was the RBF Sailing Team helmed by Andrei Eliseev.

    Day 2- MATRYOSHKA and ZID Art Tied for Lead
    If Friday’s sailing was tiring, then Saturday’s seven hours of racing might have finished everyone off!  Eighteen races were completed in perfect weather- sunny, warm, gusts over 20 kts!

    Two teams seemed to revel in the conditions and ended up tied on points.  The biggest and fastest ascent up the leaderboard was Natalia Kravets’ MATROYSHKA Team, now tied on points for the lead with Paunovich’s ZID Art crew. Then, yet another top Russian woman skipper also loved the breeze-on racing and now sat in third place- Karina Teliants’ 7-YACHTS Sailing Team!

    Day 3- ZID Art Wins!
    On the final day, twelve more races were held, so each team held 18 or 19 races. For those who had less starts, the average points of the team in the races was added to the total number of points.

    Vladimir Khomenko, Chief Judge, commented on what transpired on Sunday, “Today, the wind conditions in the morning were very difficult.  The wind whirled around in a complete circle, we had to rearrange the marks three times before the first race, and during the day, we also had to correct it again. Sunday afternoon was relatively calm, there were few false starts, but the fleet suffered today- serious clashes took place. I would like to note that the rivals on the final day generally behaved more aggressively on the water, the starts in particular!

    This aggressiveness was evident in the number of collisions between the top boats, it was obvious skippers were taking chances to get a better score.  Most of the time it did not pay off, as the judges flagged them for penalties.”

    In the end, there was no equal to Paunovich's ZID Art Sailing team, winning four of the five races on their last day to clinch the overall win.

    Paunovich commented on their performance, “For the last month, we now have raced three times in Konakovo.  In the first two regattas, we became much better acquainted with the waters and the difficult, lake-type sailing conditions- it is very puffy and shifty on the river! We are very satisfied with our results! The last day was especially successful, when everything worked out for us. I want to note that our competitors are getting much better, and this is very encouraging for the league.  We now look forward to sailing in St. Petersburg and Moscow for more training.”

    Natalia Kravets’ MATRYOSHKA team from Ekaterinburg took second, their first time on the podium and her best performance so far.  Finishing third, and also their first time on the podium, was the SAIL&SEA Team skippered by Vasily Kharabardin.

    Dropping to fourth place was Karina Teliants’ crew on 7-YACHTS.  As a result, she is still leading the overall Premiere League standings after three events.

    After a two months “break”, all the teams will head west to St. Petersburg to go sailing on the Baltic Sea.
    For more Russian J/70 Sailing League information
     

    KSSS Win Swedish J/70 Sailing League @ Ekero
    (Ekero, Sweden)- The second of four events that constitute the 2018 Swedish Sailing League series took place in Ekero, a pretty town just outside of Stockholm.  The fleet of eighteen sailing clubs from across Sweden was having a difficult time with the sailing conditions and, as a result, only ten of the scheduled fifteen races were sailed by each team.

    Despite having a European match-racing champion as their skipper- Björn Hansen- the KSSS (Royal Swedish YC) were struggling to stay ahead of the GKSS Youth squad!

    "It has been fun sailing in weak and nasty conditions. We were very pleased with our sailing, winning seven wins and a second and third place before we got match race in the last race; it was against the GKSS kids, the only ones who had the chance to pass us overall. A fourth place in the final race with GKSS behind us secured victory for our KSSS team,” said skipper Bjorn Hansen.

    Hansen has been one of the world's elite in match racing for the past 25 years.  But, despite an average age of about 40 years and great experience on their KSSS team, it was tough for them to beat the GKSS Youth team with an average age of 18 yrs old! In the end, it was experience and consistency that trumped youthful enthusiasm.

    The KSSS team consisted of Björn Hansen, Mathias Hermansson, Mathias Bredin, Pontus Meijer and Liv Gyllfors - an 18-year-old Laser Radial girl that greatly contributed to the victory.

    The GKSS Youths were comprised of Hannes Westberg, Hugo Westberg, Oscar Engström and Hedvig Hedström. They certainly got the attention of the other seventeen teams on Friday when they won all three races and were tied with KSSS for the lead at the end of the day!  An impressive debut for “the kids” and they will certainly be a force to reckon with for the rest of the season.

    Taking third in Ekero was the Sotefjordens SS and the same position in the overall series.  After the two events, KSSS have now taken over first place in the series over Cape Crow YC (whose top team was at the SAILING Champions League Semi-final down in Porto Cervo, Italy).    For more Swedish J/70 Sailing League information
     

    J’s Dominate Chicago  COLORS Regatta
    (Chicago, IL)- Summer sailing on Lake Michigan was kicked off with J/Teams dominating the results of the Columbia YC Skyway Yacht Works COLORS regatta. Forty-three J’s sailed in the regatta.  Saturday was overcast with moderate air and lumpy seas. It was a good start to the summer. However, Sunday brought clear skies and wind that started at 12 kts and increased to 25 kts by midday- awesome spring-like weather off the picturesque Chicago skyline along the waterfront.

    In the PHRF long distance big boat section race, Ben Lumpkin’s J/112E MARY GAIL placed first and Mike Haney and Tracy Hixon’s J/112E AXOLOTL placed 4th.  Amazingly, in between the two J/112E’s were two of the hottest offshore boats from Chicago- the J/V 66 DEFIANCE and the 1D35 Turbo DIRE WOLF.  In short, a fantastic performance for the inaugural races for the two Chicago-based 112E’s!   In the PHRF single-handed section, Mark Gannon’s J/105 GANGBUSTER placed first.

    Then, there were the five J/one design sections- J/70s, J/105s, J/88s, J/109s, J/111s.

    In the J/70 class, Mark and Sarah Renz took the honors, followed by Adam Bowen’s BLACK PEARL in second, and John Heaton’s well-traveled crew on EMPEIRIA in third.

    In the hotly contested seven-boat J/111 class, it was current World Champion, Peter Wagner, sailing his San Francisco-based SKELETON KEY to the class win.  In the last two races, Rich Witzel’s Chicago-crew on ROWDY traded 1st and 2nd with Wagner’s team to take the silver.  Then, past COLORS Regatta winners, the three Musketeers on KAHSMIR (Karl Brummel, Steve Henderson, Mike Mayer) took the third position.

    Also having strong, close racing was the eight-boat J/88 class.  Winning their first major event in the 88s was Ben Marden’s BANTER.  Andy Graff’s EXILE team started off on the wrong foot, a 6th in the first race, but closed fast on the BANTER crew to take the silver just two points back.  Third was Tim Wade’s WINDSONG, their first time on the podium in the 88s, too.

    The J/105’s had one super boat and eight regular boats!  St. Francis J/105 skipper Bruce Stone journeyed to Chicago for the season opener hosted by Columbia YC and crushed the competition with a perfect five bullets in five races on the chartered J/105 GRYPHON #29 with owner Sam Powers on board at pit.  The SF-based team is using the COLORS Regatta and next weekend’s Chicago NOOD as a warm-up for the J/105 North American’s in Harbor Springs in July.  Stone’s team included David Kelly, Ryan Simmons, Sam Powers, Bruce Stone, Phil Berner, and Aliki Navajas (L to R).

    Clark Pellett’s SEALARK #349 finished second with 12 points and Jon Weglarz’s THE ASYKLUM #673 finished third with 14 points.

    Finally, the J/109’s had six boats with Robert Evans’ GOAT RODEO winning the class.  Jim Murray’s CALLISTO started off fast with two bullets, suffered a huge brain fade in races 3 & 4 with a 3-5, then won the last race; enough to grab the silver.  Sailing consistently with three 3rds and 1-4 to take the bronze was Peter Priede’s FULL TILT.  For more Skyway Yachtworks COLORS Regatta sailing information
     

    J/111 BLUR Wins Skagen Offshore Race
    (Skagen, Sweden)- Here is the report from Peter Gustafsson racing on his J/111 BLUR.SE.

    “It is the first race of the season, and it can be anything from a hell of strong breeze of 14 m/s and frost at night to an amazing race with great sunsets and sunrises. This year we were definitely closer to the latter option ...

    Above all, the pre-race dinner was fine. In 2015, we tried to make the dinner the night before the race to get together a coordinated training session where we can determine our watches and get into offshore mode.

    We have three watches, with 2 hours on, 2 hours standby and two hours in the bunk. With only five on board, I became my own watch. Not optimal, but we still want to sail this way.

    After a nice wind from Stora Pölsan to Færder lighthouse, the wind turned north and diminished. We were given a chance to look at our Code 1, which we bought used for Fastnet and has been unused since then. In the IRC, the half width must be at least 75%, so it becomes an ugly kinky shape compared to a "correct" Code 0.

    In Åsgårdsstrand, he we had lunch at the hotel, prepared the boat, and slept for a few hours before it was time again to race.

    We got off well, like another boat at the left and could head east up the fjord. We had difficulty keeping up with the First 40 and X41, which is normal for us in these circumstances.

    It had been good wind for all previous starts before us.  But, according to the forecasts, the wind started to decline when we started at 20:40. In the end, it all died!  Ouch!

    There appeared to be consensus that the eastern side of the fjord was better. Both in the fjord and later during the race. Maybe we went south too early. But, we took off like a train when the wind came back in.  A few that lay further west did OK, so we had some luck there.

    Flash Tango and Magic had gone better than us, many talented sailors who are still in the top.

    Here, I became a little negative and felt that we had missed the train. In 2010 + 2015 we had succeeded in taking early initiative and leading the class out of the fjord. Now, we were forced to hunt our competitors.

    After the Pisces turning mark, there was a big wind shift, and we were discussing different options. It would be one option to stay on layline and wait for the lift. Or, we could go east to get it first and maximize the effect.

    The routing software indicated going east would take 20 minutes longer.  So, we stood by for about half an hour before the wind started to lift us. We looked inside for the boats we saw on AIS to the east of us, not moving so well. So, we battle south again.

    After a few minutes, Flash did the same thing. No real split, but we now had a better position than those that made us go some extra distance away. Phew.

    The new instruments worked well. Especially in light weather, they are different from Nexus, but it is probably the most common cause. Then it's a difficult time of year to fine-tune numbers. Big differences at different altitudes over the water, and lots of wind-shear. But, overall we are where we had hoped. Fun!

    One of the things that is difficult is to sail actively when it is dark and cold. We handle most things well, but for long periods, we are passive in both trim and steering. Due in part to the fact that we were only 5 crew, we need to find better routines to operate 100% under all conditions.

    Pretty dramatic going down the Weather Islands, where we met the boats that started from Stenungsund. Here it was also clear that the boats that came from the west, like Pixeline, had a hard time. We tested using the Code 1 just after Skålholmen, but realized quickly that we could not bear off to fly it and went back to the jib. We tested at least ... nothing ventured, nothing gained, right?

    It turned out that the early boats had good pressure all the way, and on the overall scores, you see that the boats that were over the finish line before 13:00 were best placed. It was only the really fast and the faster shorthanded boats that started at 19:20 that got in that early. We were over an hour behind them at sea and struggled with diminishing winds.

    But, at least we could chase the First 40 Flash, as we watched them constantly following on the AIS. From over 1 nm behind to 0.7nm to 0.4nm, we kept narrowing the gap with them. We tried to see which angles were most efficient for us, and where they might have been having difficulties. In the end, we passed them while they were trying hard to defend themselves by changing to another sail.

    Now, I looked a little closer on the scores, and we found that we would be finished in about 10 minutes. It was hard to get there, but we did what we could in the declining wind. Good change between A3, Code and then A3 again. And, finally, we were almost 15 minutes ahead of them on elapsed time, good for the corrected time overall win!  A great win for us, and amazing teamwork!”  For more Skagen Race sailing information.
     

    J/70 Moscow Summer Series Growing In Popularity!
    (Moscow, Russia)- PRO Yachting, in conjunction with the Royal Yacht Club (Moscow), have started their increasingly popular Summer Series on the “Water Stadium” in a park on the southwest outskirts of Moscow.  Sailing in a fleet of supplied J/70s, teams can choose at which level they wish to sail: the Tuesday Warm-Up Race Series for inexperienced sailors or the Wednesday Night Race Series sponsored by Ulysse Nardin.

    On Tuesday, May 29th, the third weekly regatta of the Tuesday Warm-Up Race series was held. This year, the winners of the season will get a free trip to Germany from the main sponsor of this series- the premium mineral water company- Gerolsteiner.

    Forty-five sailors on ten boats showed up for this Tuesday event.  After five quick races before sunset, the winners and podium was the following:
    1. Team MOSCOW 24 (Denis Elahovsky, Eugene Sutyrin, Nikita Pimenov, Valentin Uvarkin)
    2. Team BIG FISH (Inna Ozhogina, Ivan Bodyagin, Stanislav Melinger, Igor Puzanov)
    3. Team BONJORNO TUTTI (Sergey Kudrin, Nikolay Khlystov, Dmitry Afendikov, Andrey Novikov)
    “Our plans for the season is to take a place in the top three," said Sergei Kudrin, a regular member of the team BONJORNO TUTTI. “Last year we were the fourth, so this we want to raise the stakes higher. We did not train in the winter, but now we plan to go out on Saturdays on the Lasers at the Water Stadium, it adds to the understanding of how the winds shift, which we hope will help us!"

    Then, on Wednesday, May 30th, the Royal Yacht Club hosted the second weekly regatta for the Wednesday Night Race series.  The winner will get the main prize- the Marine Torpilleur chronometer watch from the legendary Swiss watchmaker Ulysse Nardin.

    "Today was a moment like in a movie- we made a turn amid a large number of boats and, somehow, emerged beautifully from a dangerous situation. Of course, we were proud of ourselves! Yachting is interesting, I liked everything very much, I will recommend it to my friends," shared Yevgeny Ryaschenko in her first experience sailing in the close racing.

    The winners after four races were the following:
    1. DREAM TEAM (Elena Pushkareva, Julia Buchkovskaya, Alena Shchukina, Inna Ozhogina, Igor Puzanov)
    2. Team 7-YACHT (Karina Teliants, Dmitriy Tarba, Alexey Frolov, Bukin Vyacheslav)
    3. NO PASARAN Team (Ekaterina Sychev, Nikolay Khlystov, Mikhail Loskov, Igor Manshin, Valentin Uvarkin).
    PROyachting congratulates the winners and prize-winners of the evening regattas.  For more Moscow J/70 Summer Series sailing information- call +7 499 393 31 33 (from 10.00 to 21.00) or write to email- info@pro-yachting.ru.
     

    Challenging Bayview One-Design Regatta
    (Detroit, MI)- This past weekend, the Bayview YC hosted their popular Bayview One-Design Regatta on Lake St. Clair, just north of the Detroit River and downtown “Motor City”.  The largest classes included the J/70s, J/35s, and the omni-present J/120s.

    The J/70s continue to grow significantly in the Detroit area, with fifteen boats participating in this year’s event.  After four races, it was Lee Sackett’s and Dave Kerr’s team on USA 364 that won the even with three 1sts in four races.  Second was fellow family member Tod Sackett on FM taking the tie-breaker on 14 pts each over Jake Christy’s PALE HORSE.  The balance of the top five were Don Glover’s MISS KILLER also taking a tie-breaker on 21 pts each over Ted Pinkerton’s LITTLE SIDE HUSTLE.

    In the enormous J/120 class of eleven boats, it was a titanic struggle between the top three teams all weekend long.  Ultimately, staying out of trouble and winning the class was Mike & Bob Kirkman’s HOT TICKET with a 2-1-5-1 tally for 9 pts.  Winning the class after three races was Mike Fozo & Robin Kendrick’s PROOF, but their 7th in the last race nearly killed their chances to be on the podium.  What happened is they ended up tied on points with Ken Brown’s notoriously fun crew on J-HAWKER, but their two 1sts in a 1-3-1-7 tally earned them the silver.  Fourth was Tim Yanda’s VIVA LA VIDA and fifth, yet again on a tie-breaker, was Chuck Hess’ FUNTECH RACING.

    The eight-boat J/35 class saw Ed Bayer’s FALCON sail a consistent series with a 2-1-3-2 tally for 8 pts to easily take the crown.  Third was Greg Valez’s AMANTE.  For more Bayview YC One-Design regatta information
     

    J/Crews Love Southern Bay Race Week
    (Hampton, VA)- Every year the Hampton YC hosts the popular Southern Bay Race Week for a combination of one-design and PHRF handicap classes.  It is a popular event for sailors across Chesapeake Bay since it coincides with a highly popular “pirates weekend” in downtown Hampton.

    In the J/24 class, it was Alan Bomar’s ROUNDABOUT taking the class win after seven races, accumulating three 1sts and three 2nds to win with 9 pts net.  Second was Mike Veraldi’s QUICKY with four 1sts, but having to eat a last in two races to end up with 11 pts net. Taking the bronze on the podium was Ray Nugent’s ROCKET J with 16 pts net.

    The nine-boat PHRF Super A Class saw Jim Connelly’s crew on the J/111 SLUSH FUND take the silver after an uncharacteristic slow start, posting a 5-2-1- for 8 pts.

    Winning in a sweep of the top spots were two J/36s in PHRF A1 Class; Phil Briggs’ FEATHER with a 5-1-1 for 7 pts taking the gold and Will Roberts’ REMEDY the silver after a 4-3-2 for 9 pts.

    The PHRF B1 Class was won by Ben Weeks & Michele Cochran’s J/29 RUMBE with a 2-4-2 for 8 pts.  Third was Doug Bird’s J/70 GET MY BOAT.COM with a 4-1-5 for 10 pts.

    In PHRF B2, Rusty Burshell’s J/30 COOL CHANGE took the silver with a consistent 2-3-2 for 7 pts.  For more Southern Bay Race Week sailing information
     

    ARMEN HABITAT Dominates J/80 Open La Rochelle
    (La Rochelle, France)- As part of the season-long France J/80 Cup Series, the crews participate in some of the more picturesque seaside towns along the French coastline.  The J/80 La Rochelle event was hosted by Societe Regate La Rochelle for a fleet of fifteen J/80 crews from across France.

    After an eight race series over two days, long-time J/80 veterans, Simon Moriceau’s crew on ARMEN HABITAT, won the regatta by winning five straight races for a total 7 pts net.  An old nemesis of their’s, Patrick Bot’s ECOLE NAVALE CGEC sailed well but could not match the remarkable performance of their colleagues, finishing with 12 pts net.  Taking third was Sylvain Pellisier’s INTUITIVE SAILS with 16 pts net.  Top woman skipper, Anne Phelipon on NAVIGATLANTIQUE took fourth with 19 pts net to also lead the overall women’s division for the season series.  For more J/80 La Rochelle sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
    * J/88 Race 2 Alaska!?  Scott Grealish has provided his J/88 BLUE FLASH to his son Sean and friends to do the epic “green” race from Port Townsend (Seattle), WA to Ketchikan, Alaska- the epic 750nm Race 2 Alaska that starts on June 15th, 2018.  Sails, oars, and pedal power are all permitted to propel your boat.  The inside passage to Alaska has been paddled by native canoes since time immemorial, sailing craft for centuries, and after someone found gold in the Klondike the route was jammed with steamboats full of prospectors elbowing each other out of the way for the promise of fortune.

    It’s in the spirit of tradition, exploration, and the lawless self-reliance of the gold rush that Race to Alaska was born. R2AK is the first of its kind and North America’s longest human and wind powered race, and currently the largest cash prize for a race of its kind. $10,000 if you finish first, a set of steak knives if you’re second. Cathartic elation if you can simply complete the course. R2AK is a self-supported race with no supply drops and no safety net. Any boat without an engine can enter.

    Here is Scott’s commentary on their mission:

    “My son Sean is leading an all youth team (William-Patrick Blouin-Comeau, Maisie Bryant, Grant Gridley, Jack Holbrook) on our J/88 BLUE FLASH in the crazy race to Alaska. He's going to write up some stuff for their sponsors and would be happy to share. I think they are the first J/Boat to do R2AK.

    Their incredibly amusing bio for the J/88 BLUE FLASH "kids" is here.

    They have some photos showing the pedal drive (see here), solar power, and craziest of all, pulling out the engine on their Instagram here.

    I'm personally doing the delivery back (with engine), which is downwind!  Thank goodness!”

    * Jean Rheault’s J/41 SOUAY 1 recently raced the 17th Samui Regatta off the Centara Grand Beach Resort Samui in Thailand.

    They sailed as a "shorthanded" crew, with Jean Rheault, Cedric Rimaud, Guido Wedekind and Ray Waldron.  They won all three days! Amazing! Go to these links!

    https://www.facebook.com/Souay1.J41/
    https://www.facebook.com/SamuiRegatta/

    * Don DeLoatch’s J/70 GET MY BOAT was recently featured on FOX News “Fox & Friends” morning show in downtown New York City.  Here is an amusing video update of their travels around downtown Manhattan with their truck and trailer on the busy streets of the city.

    https://youtu.be/Dg2fiIKgqiU

    Stu Johnstone reflects on a similar experience with his brother Drake regards moving J/24s around downtown Manhattan.  Described Stu, “I will never forget doing something similar with our J/24.  My brother and I had just sailed the J/24 East Coasts down in Annapolis.  After finishing Sunday, we grabbed a big box of soft shell crab and that awesome spicy stuff, three cases of beer, and drove into downtown NYC with our Chevy Suburban and J/24 in tow on Sunday evening.  We parked it right in the middle of Sutton Square on the Upper East Side.  We stayed at a friend’s house there in Sutton Square overnight and enjoyed Russian "moonshine" vodka straight from Moscow- frozen to -30 F!!  Still liquid, of course, had a hint of mint in it. Needless to say, vodka, beer chasers and soft shell crabs was a huge hit!  Driving in city traffic the next morning was hilarious! No one seemed to have ever seen a sailboat on a trailer in mid-town Manhattan!” Add to Flipboard Magazine.

    Read more...
  • J/Newsletter- May 30th, 2018 J/121 Racing Update
    (Newport, RI)- This past weekend, it was a beehive of activity for newly launched J/121s.  All are preparing for the upcoming Newport to Bermuda Race. Joe Brito’s team on INCOGNITO did their first offshore “shakedown” cruise, going around an offshore mark 60nm SSE of Brenton Reef, sailing in up to 40 kts of wind!  Yet another- Steve Levy’s EAGLE- was sailing in the Storm Trysail Club’s famous Block Island Race, a 186nm “practice race” for Bermuda- a great training exercise.  And, one more- David Southwell’s ALCHEMY- was sailing the fun-loving 30nm FIGAWI Race from Hyannis to Nantucket on a random leg course.

    For current and prospective J/121 owners, here is an updated schedule of events many J/121 teams are focused on for summer 2018, the fall, and, in particular, the Winter Circuit in 2019.

    2018

    2019
    Follow the J/121 Class on Facebook here  For more J/121 offshore speedster sailing information
     

    SAILING Champions League- Porto Cervo Preview
    (Porto Cervo, Sardinia, Italy)- The SAILING Champions League 2018 kicks off on Thursday with a semifinal contest in Porto Cervo, Sardinia. Teams from twenty-four clubs representing thirteen nations will be competing in Porto Cervo (31 May to 3 June) for one of fifteen spots for the big SAILING Champions League Final in St. Moritz, Switzerland, at the end of August.

    Teams are coming from all corners of Europe, including Slovenia for the first time. There will be a strong contingent from the Nordic and central European countries.

    Among the strongest contenders with a proven track record in Porto Cervo is the club from Switzerland, Regattaclub Bodensee;  runner-up at the SAILING Champions League Final last season. Former Olympic 470 sailor Julian Flessati brings a strong crew to see if they can win this time on the gorgeous azure waters surrounding Sardinia.

    Among those taking part in SAILING Champions League for the first time are the Royal Yacht Club Monaco, which is putting out an extremely accomplished team skippered by François Brenac, whose CV is peppered with victories in major championships. The three-time Olympic campaigner for France has won world titles in the J/22 and J/80 keelboats and two campaigns for France in the America’s Cup. The front of his boat is no less impressive, including two of France’s greatest 49er Olympic skiff competitors, Stephane Christidis on tactics and Yann Rocherieux on mainsail trim. Newcomers they may be, but a crew of this pedigree has every chance of winning on its first attempt.

    Representing Norway is Moss Seilforening, with accomplished multihull sailor, Formula 18 competitor Karl-Einar Jensen; proving in recent years that he’s also very well adapted to the short-course keelboat competition format of League sailing.  In addition, Finland’s Åländska Segelsällskapet is a serious contender for victory in Sardinia. Among Daniel Mattsson’s Finnish crew is Staffan Lindberg, one of the best match racers in the world and well-qualified to call tactics for the Finnish team.

    According to Edoardo Recchi, Sports Director from the YC Costa Smeralda, “there are no secret ingredients to success in the SAILING Champions League. Just a lot of training and good teamwork. One of the most important things is starting at full throttle. You have to be awake from the very start and be ready to win the moment the first gun sounds. Since the beginning, the YCCS has been a big supporter of SAILING Champions League and the league concept. We organized the SAILING Champions League event in Italy in 2015 because we believe in the format. We felt that a serious challenge between clubs from all over the world was missing from our calendar at that time”.

    The YCCS regatta is the first of two semifinals, with the second semifinal due to be hosted by St. Petersburg Yacht Club in Russia from August 3rd to 6th, just a few weeks before the 2018 Finale, which will be hosted for the first time by Segel-Club St. Moritz, high up in the Swiss Alps from 30th August to 2nd September.

    LIVE broadcasting by SAP
    As with all SAILING Champions League events, the semifinal in Porto Cervo will be “live” broadcasted by SAP and SailTracks for the final two days of competition. You can follow the racing live on Saturday and Sunday at 12:00hrs (CEST) on sailing-championsleague.com. The SAP Sailing Analytics provide 24/7 additional statistics and data for sailors, fans, spectators and media like GPS tracking, real-time analysis, live leaderboard combined with 3D visualization. You find all results on sapsailing.com!   SAILING Champions League Promo video on Facebook   For more SAILING Champions League regatta information
     

    Women's SAILING Champions League Update
    (Kiel, Germany)- The preparations for the first Women’s SAILING Champions League are in full swing. From June 16 to 18, the best women European sailing teams will compete at Kiel Week in Germany. A number of women’s teams representing clubs from across Europe have already registered.

    At this innovative sailing event presented by Audi, each National Sailing League can appoint two clubs that will be invited to the event. Additionally, there will be wild cards for other yacht clubs assigned by the SAILING Champions League Steering Committee.

    Laura Fischer, member of the Deutscher Touring Yacht Club from Germany, told us how excited their team is to sail at this special event:

    “We are happy to be part of the first-ever Women’s SAILING Champions League. With Anna Seidl, Mareike Weber, Monika Linder, Linda Weber, and myself, we put together a young, but at the same time very experienced team. We are curious about the other women crews from our European competitors and we are looking forward to exciting races in Kiel!”

    Each team will compete with a four to five-person crew. The event will be sailed in matched J/70 one-design sailboats and the racing area will be in the famous Kiel Bay in the Baltic Sea.

    For fans without the opportunity to visit the event, there will be a livestream for one whole day of racing available on Facebook, YouTube, and also here on our website.  For more Women’s SAILING Champions League regatta information
     

    Danish YOUNGSTERS J/70 Sailing Camp Launched!
    (Horsens Havn, Denmark)- Sailing, big smiles and lots of community! With over 70 youngsters sailing on ten J/70s!  Add in expert coaching on land and sea and there was something for everyone!

    Horsens Sailing Club held the first YOUNGSTERS sailing camp for 15-23 year old kids from April 27-29 in a supplied fleet of ten matched J/70 one-design sailboats.  The event was an incredible success and the kids learned how to sail the J/70s quickly, thanks to the experts guiding them on sail trim, tuning, and boathandling.

    "We had great participation from youth sailors across Denmark, in fact a full camp! We can be satisfied with the fact that exploring new and unknown territory with the YOUNGSTERS program paid off tremendously. The kids were incredibly enthusiastic and want to continue participating in more camps this summer,” says YOUNGSTERS Project Manager Peter Wolsing.

    The focus of the YOUNGSTERS program is to create experiences, learning, and social networks that can fill the young people with new inspiration and enthusiasm when they go back to their home clubs.

    Wolsing continued to elaborate, "For us, it's about breaking down barriers and opening new opportunities for youth sailors. We need more young people to sail, we need to think in new and creative ways to engage the youth and get them on the water. We believe that YOUNGSTERS sailing on J/70s can be one of those outlets.  The kids loved the J/70s, it was easy for them to handle in all winds, and it’s fun and social for them to have five kids on board.”

    Wolsing also mentioned that one of the big carrots is that two YOUNGSTERS teams will be selected, sponsored, and be allowed to participate in the Danish J/70 Sailing League Second Division this summer!
    Sailing photos credit- Per Heegaard

    Watch and “share” these videos of happy kids having fun sailing J/70s in Denmark!
    https://www.facebook.com/youngsterssailer/videos/165187774164164/
    https://www.facebook.com/youngsterssailer/videos/155386961810912/
    https://www.facebook.com/youngsterssailer/videos/164753574207584/

    Follow the J/70 Youngsters on Instagram or Facebook.
    https://www.facebook.com/youngsterssailer/
    https://www.instagram.com/youngsterssailor/
    For more Danish J/70 YOUNGSTERS sailing program information
     

    Race for Prostate Cancer Awareness!
    Come'on Man, Help Fellow Sailors!
    (Chicago, IL)- It’s the thing guys don’t talk about but, 1-in-9 men will get prostate cancer and 1-in-40 will die from it! Most men don’t even know what the prostate does. This is not just a sailboat race, but a race for you! Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for men in America behind lung cancer!

    Richie Stearns, the Chicago/ Midwest J/Boats dealer commented on his personal experience:

    “Two years ago I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. I would have thought there were only one or two options for treatment when you are diagnosed. Well, it turns out there are all kinds of options available and no one seems to know which is best. It ends up being a very personal decision, on which treatment is right for you. I went to University of Chicago on the recommendation of a fellow sailor.

    I am doing this race to raise funds so the University of Chicago can better explain the options available to you if it happens to you or a loved one. In addition, after the treatment or surgery there is very little information on what to expect and what to do to get back to normal. I have struggled with what to do post-surgery and have done all kinds of research on my own. It is disheartening when much of the information is old, and not just old, but plainly wrong. I hope we can raise funds so more men can understand options available to them and what they can or have to do to live a normal life.

    This sailing event will raise money so you will be able to get the knowledge you will need if it happens to you. Cancer is not something that always happens to someone else.

    Please give so we can help everyone make knowledgeable decisions that will affect their future.”

    Please donate here on University of Chicago/ Medicine & Biological Sciences site- https://bit.ly/2IYe2xs

    Richie is racing the J/88 HOLY SMOKES in the 22nd running of the Solo Chicago Mackinac Challenge that starts on June 22, 2018.  It is a 289nm non-stop race across Lake Michigan, from Chicago to Mackinac Island.  It usually takes between 55 and 80 hours of racing for the twenty-seven boats currently registered.  If you wish to contact Rich Stearns about the race or his experience- cell# 847-404-2209 or email- rich@stearnsboating.com   Learn more about Richie’s Prostate Cancer Race challenge here
    For more Single-handed Chicago to Mackinac Island race information, sponsored by the Great Lakes Singlehanded Society.
     

    J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    The Memorial Day Weekend in America is a celebration to honor those that served in the military and are no longer with us.  In addition, for the sailing community it was also a time to celebrate what amounts to the official start of the summer sailing season.  A number of major offshore races from the east coast to the west coast and even in the southeast took place that saw some amazing outcomes, and cause for major celebrations, by many J/Crews!

    For starters, on the East Coast, there were three events.  The “big one” was the classic 186nm Block Island Race run by the Storm Trysail Club, with J/Teams sailing everything from J/30s up to J/122s and J/133s took part and collected lots of silver.  Adding to the trophy shelf were several J’s in the equally famous “race to the party”, the fabled FIGAWI Race from Hyannis, MA to Nantucket Island. Dozens of J/teams took part, including a fast J/121.  Down in the southeast, the biennial 226nm Gulf Streamer Race was sailed from Daytona Beach, FL to Charleston, SC- it was an epic storm-tossed race with a fast J/120 involved, the event was hosted by the Halifax River YC and Charleston YC.

    Off to the west coast, lots of racing was taking place along the Pacific coastline.  Up in the northwest, it was the famous, classic Swiftsure International Yacht Race, hosted by the Royal Victoria YC in Victoria, BC, Canada.  A fleet of J’s had a remarkable outcome in the popular Cape Flattery Race (101.9nm), there was a J/160 in the Hein Bank Race  (118.1nm), and J/30s and J/35s in the Juan de Fuca Race (78.7nm).  South of them, a dozen J’s sailed in the start of the California Offshore series, it was the Spinnaker Cup Race- an 88.0nm sprint from San Francisco Bay down the Pacific coast to Monterey Bay.

    Hopping across the “big pond”, the holiday weekend marked the occasion for the wonderfully popular J/CUP Regatta hosted by the Island Sailing Club in Cowes, England, with racing taking place on the magnificent, enigmatic, perplexing Solent. The regatta served as the National Championship for J/88s, J/97s, J/109s, and J/111s and also included an IRC handicap class. Further down the coast to the west country, it was a great weekend for the annual Poole Regatta, hosted by Poole YC; the event was also classified as the UK J/24 Nationals, a strong 21-boat fleet endured three gorgeous days of racing.

    Over the ditch and on to Continental Europe, we find Danish sailors loving sailing the first event in the Danish J/70 Sailing League in Frederikshavn, Denmark hosted by the Frederikshavn Sailing Club for eighteen teams, racing six boats. Jumping across the Baltic Sea to the north, the Norwegian sailors also had a blast racing in the first Norwegian J/70 Sailing League event in Bodø, Norway for fifteen teams on six boats, hosted by the Bodø Sailing Association.

    Read on! The J/Community and Cruising section below has many entertaining stories and news about J/Sailors as well as cruising blogs about those who continue to enjoy the Caribbean and the South Pacific, staying warm while others are trying to stay warm up north.  Check them out!  More importantly, if you have more J/Regatta News, please email it or  upload onto our J/Boats Facebook pag  Below are the summaries.

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    May 31-Jun 3- SAILING Champions League- Act I- Porto Cervo, Sardinia, Italy
    May 31-Jun 3- Southern Bay Race Week- Hampton, VA
    Jun 1-3- J/30 North American Championship- Westport, CT
    Jun 1-3- Bayview One-Design Regatta- Detroit, MI
    Jun 1-3- J/80 Open La Rochelle- La Rochelle, France
    Jun 1-3- Spanish J/70 National Championship- Vigo, Spain
    Jun 1-3- Susan Hood Trophy Race- Port Credit, Ontario
    Jun 2-3- Cedar Point One-Design Regatta- Westport, CT
    Jun 2-3- COLORS Regatta- Chicago, IL
    Jun 2- Delta Ditch Run- Stockton, CA
    Jun 8-10- Helly Hansen NOOD Regatta Chicago- Chicago, IL
    Jun 8-16- IRC European Championship- Cowes, England
    Jun 8-10- New York YC Annual Regatta- Newport, RI
    Jun 9-10- Australian J/24 Midwinter Championship- Cronulla, NSW, Australia
    Jun 9- Farallones Islands Race- Belvedere, CA
    Jun 9-16- J/70 European Championship- Vigo, Spain
    Jun 15-17- Cleveland Race Week- Cleveland, OH
    Jun 15- Newport to Bermuda Race- Newport, RI
    Jun 16-24- Kiel Week/ Kieler Woche- Kiel, Germany
    Jun 16-18- Women’s SAILING Champions League- Kiel, Germany
    Jun 16-17- Three Buoy Fiasco- Seattle, WA
    Jun 17-22- Block Island Race Week- Block Island, RI
    Jun 20-23- J/22 North American Championship- Wayzata, MN
    Jun 22-24- J/FEST Seattle- Seattle, WA
    Jun 22- RORC Morgan Cup Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    Jun 22-24- Long Beach Race Week- Long Beach, CA
    Jun 23-25- J/70 EURO CUP V- Riva del Garda, Italy
    Jun 28- Jul 1- Norwegian J/70 National Championship- Hanko, Norway
    Jun 29- Jul 1- New York YC One-Design Regatta- Newport, RI
    Jun 30- Vic-Maui International Yacht Race- Victoria, BC, Canada
    Jul 7-14- J/80 World Championship- Les Sables d’Olonne, France
    Jul 7- Round the Island Race- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    Jul 7-8- Sail Newport Regatta- Newport, RI

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

    J/Crews Dominate STC Block Island Race
    J/44 KENAI Tops IRC, J/105 & J/120 Top PHRF Classes
    (Larchmont, NY)- The Memorial Day classic for Long Island Sound sailors, the 186nm Block Island Race, started on Friday afternoon with a parade of spinnakers off the starting line in a fresh 15-20 kts southwest breeze.  Hosted by the Storm Trysail Club, the event drew eighty-five boats, seventeen of them J/Crews (20% of the fleet) from New York, Connecticut, Texas, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island.

    It was a dominating performance for some of the J/teams entered in the race.  First J/Boat to finish was Chris Lewis’ J/44 KENAI at 16:06:30 Saturday afternoon, not only winning IRC 3 Class, but being awarded the Harvey Conover Memorial Overall Trophy for the “Best Overall Performance” by the Storm Trysail Club Flag and Race officers.  Their team led a near sweep of the top five in class.  Following them in third was Jack Gregg’s J/122 TARAHUMARA, fourth was Len Sitar’s J/44 VAMP, and fifth was John Donovan’s J/111 LIBERTAS.

    In IRC 4 Class, Dale and Mike McIvor’s J/133 MATADOR finished fifth.  And, in IRC 5 Class, Brian Prinz’s J/125 SPECTRE took fourth.

    In PHRF 3 and PHRF 5 classes, Frank Conway’s J/105 RAPTOR and Rick Oricchio’s J/120 ROCKET SCIENCE both won their respective classes and also finished 1-2 overall!  Then, in PHRF 5 Class, Brian Spears’ J/120 MADISON took third and Bill Ingraham’s J/124 TENEBRAE finished fourth.

    At the prize-giving, hosted by Storm Trysail Club at Stamford YC, Commodore Len Sitar (J/44 sailor) held a moment of silence in remembrance of America’s fallen heroes who fought for the freedoms Americans now enjoy. Afterwards, Chris Lewis (owner of the J/44 KENAI) explained how they achieved their epic performance:

    “This was our earliest finish ever. We are used to creeping in at night with no breeze. Generally, the rich got richer in this race as the fastest boats finished in pressure; especially the TP52 Spookie that finished at 9:05 am. We had 15 miles of very light pressure to the finish line in the late afternoon.

    The race started in a fresh southwest breeze blowing 15-20 kts. The broad reach turned into a power reach halfway to The Race at the eastern end of Long Island Sound. We went from the A2 to A3 asymmetric. Some went to their Code Zeros or flying jibs.

    We exited at the southern edge of the Races in a strong ebb tide, hitting 12-15 knots under A3 and staysail at 130 TWA and 18-24 TWS.

    After a run to the “1-BI” red bell turning mark off the northern end of Block Island in 8-12 knots and sloppy seas, the tough part of the race began. 25 knots from the SW was reported at the Block Island airstrip, so we set a heavy #1 and soon saw cold 20 knot blasts. After a bare-headed change to a #3 and reefed main (still managing 9 kts under main only with 6 crew on the bow), we executed well around the south side of the island with all crew on the rail until we got back into the Sound through Plum Gut. With the J/125 SCEPTRE next to us and the J/133 MATADOR behind, we worked the Long Island shore, passing an XP44 (the Bermuda Race winner) with a light #1 and finally crossing Long Island Sound during midday to the Connecticut shore to pick up any afternoon thermal breeze.

    For us, the key to race was the power of a modified J/44 (1.5m fixed sprit) with a 144 sq. meter 1.3oz A3 for the last 20 miles before exiting the Sound. Then, we had excellent crew work to change gears on the backside of Block Island. We were overtaking faster over canvassed boats in 20-25 knots of breeze on the wind. Finally, the 145% light #1 gave us the power needed coming up the Sound that other boats didn’t seem to have- - remember, we do have to move a lot of furniture on our J/44!!”
    For more Storm Trysail Club Block Island Race sailing information
     

    Brilliant Landsail Tyres J/CUP Regatta!
    J/111 SWEENY Awarded J/CUP for Best Performance
    (Cowes, IOW, England)- The 19th edition of the ever popular J-Boats festival- the Landsail Tyres J/CUP Regatta- was hosted and organized by the Island Sailing Club in Cowes, England.  The regatta featured handicap racing for eleven different models in the J/range and also four National Championships for the J/88, J/97, J/109 and J/111 Classes. For the two-day weekend, the action was exciting and highly competitive, racing on tight Solent courses with lots of the legendary 1 to 4 kts of current.

    Day One- Scorching Fast, Hot Racing
    For the first day of racing, a light northeasterly breeze built during the day to provide surfing conditions for the high performance classes in the fleet. The 66 strong J-Boat armada enjoyed three races in every class, save the J/70 fleet, which got an extra helping with Race 4. The Central and Eastern Solent was a magnificent sight, blooming with the many colors of the competing J-Boats, crewed by nearly 400 sailors from all over Europe.

    In the IRC Fleet, defending J-Cup winner, Chaz Ivill's J/112 DAVANTI TYRES, scored three straight bullets, but it was far from easy. “After time correction it was seconds that counted,” commented Ivill. “One poor gybe or bad decision is all it takes to drop down the fleet. There are some very good boats and teams in this class.” Mike & Sarah Wallis' well-sailed J/122 JAHMALI was second and the smallest boat at the regatta, Mike Lewis' J/80 Jester was third.

    The J/109 National Championship produced extremely close racing, with four teams vying for the lead. Simon Perry's JIRAFFE scored a bullet in Race 2 to finish the day in fourth position. John Smart's JUKEBOX scored three podium finishes to claim third. Joe Henry's JOLLY JACK TAR won the last race of the day, but it wasn't enough to take the lead. Neil Angel's DIAMOND JEM won the first race of the day, and followed that with a 2-3 to lead the J/109 Fleet after three races.

    Michiel van der Meulen's Swiss J/111 LALLEKONIG scored two race wins and led the class after three races. J/111 Class President, Chris Jones on JOURNEYMAKER II, had an excellent day on the water, scoring a race win and two third places to finish the day second, to lead the class for the UK National Title. Paul van Driel & Hans Zwijnenburg's Dutch team racing SWEENY finished the day in third. The J/111 Northern European Class has enjoyed great racing this season, and with 11 teams on the start line, it has provided a tremendous regatta for the J/111 fleet.

    “It was really close right through the fleet, very competitive starts and mark roundings, and by the third race, we were planing downwind, just amazing racing,” commented Chris Jones. “We have a young team on Journeymaker and they put in a lot of energy and enthusiasm. Just three points separate the top three, so tomorrow, we will have to be top of our game to stand a chance of winning.”

    In the 22-strong J/70 Class, five teams made the podium in the four races held. Graham Clapp's JEEPSTER scored a 2-4-3-1 to lead a class, bristling with talent. Rob Larke at the helm of MJOLNIR finished the day on a high, surfing downwind to a second place, and second for the regatta. Paul Ward's EAT SLEEP J REPEAT scored a fist-pumping win in Race 3, but finished the day in third after getting caught in the crush at a mark rounding. Doug Struth's DSP with Geoff Carveth on the stick, had a great day on the water, but a poor result in the last race put the team down to fourth. Clive Bush's DARCEY flew out of the blocks winning the first to races but an OCS in Race 3 dropped the team to fifth.

    “We managed to hold it together today,” explained J/70 Class leader Graham Clapp. “We had our moments when things didn't go according to plan, as did lots of people, but we managed to limit the damage, and then come back to take a few places to get a decent result. In the last race, Ben Saxton made a great call to stay left, which got us the win.”

    The J/88 National Championship produced an epic battle between the top contenders, Kirsty & David Apthorp's J-DREAM led on countback after three races from Gavin Howe's TIGRIS. Tim Tolcher's RAGING BULL was third. In two of day’s races, TIGRIS and RAGING BULL had a photo-finish for the line. Dirk and Dianne van Beek's SABRIEL JR finished the day in style, taking a second in the last race.

    Four teams in the J/97 National Championship made the podium on the first day of racing. Defending J/97 National Champions, Andy & Annie Howe's BLACKJACK II won the first race. Bob and Jon Baker's JAYWALKER the second and Mike Sellers & Chris Miles' HIGH JINKS the third. Robert & Rachel Hunt's JUMBLESAIL 2 scored three podium finishes to end the day in third. BLACKJACK II was second, but a 2-1-1 from JAYWALKER had the team leading the class for the championship.

    “Really close exciting racing,” commented JAYWALKER’s tactician Roger Barber. “We have had some great racing in recent years and tomorrow to get a good performance, we will have to sail really well.”

    In the J/92 Class, Robin Stevenson's UPSTART scored a 2-1-2 to take the lead by a single point from David Greenhalgh's J’RONIMO. Jack Bank's JABBERWOCK started the day with a race win, and two further podium results puts his team in third. “We take a little while to get going!” smiled David Greenhalgh. “We won the last race, so we will continue that tomorrow!”

    After racing the North Sails Video debrief was well attended by a captivated audience. Frank Gerber, Jeremy Smart, Dave Swete, and Charlie Cumbley were present from North Sails, giving tips and advice to the J-Boat fleet, using drone footage from the day's action. After the North Sails Daily Prize Giving, a crew supper was held at the Island Sailing Club.

    Day 2- Dramatic, Anxiety-ridden Finales!
    On the last day of the regatta, no one expected the standings to be so jumbled in the various fleets. In fact, in all four of the championships, the ultimate winners were decided in the very last race.

    Paul van Driel & Hans Zwijnenburg's Dutch J/111 SWEENY was awarded the J-Cup, the first overseas team to win the overall prize in the history of the event. SWEENY also won the 11-strong J/111 Class, winning the last two races, to come from behind.

    “Winning the J-Cup comes as quite a surprise,” smiled Paul van Driel at the Final Prize Giving. “I would really like to thank the organizers, they did a really good job, producing outstanding racing. We love coming to this event because we get such a warm welcome and everybody is so helpful, especially the Key Yachting team led by Paul Heys. We love racing in the J-Cup and that is why we will definitely come back.”   Sailing Video Action from the 2018 Landsail Tyres J-Cup

    J/97 National Champion – Bob & Jon Baker’s JAYWALKER
    JAYWALKER won the last race of the series to clinch the title, just a point ahead of 2017 National Champions; Annie and Andy Howe's BLACKJACK II. Mike Sellars & Chris Miles' HIGH JINKS was third. Rachel & Robert Hunt's JUMBLESAIL II made the podium in three races to finish fourth.

    “Really close exciting racing,” commented JAYWALKER’s tactician Roger Barber. “We have had some great racing in recent years, to get a good performance in this class, we have had to sail really well.”

    J/88 National Champion– Kirsty & David Apthorp's J-DREAM
    The J/88s produced a photo finish with J-DREAM winning on countback from Gavin Howe's TIGRIS. Tim Tolcher's RAGING BULL was third, and Richard Cooper's JONGLEUR made the podium in two races to finish fourth.

    “We have been second a couple of times, and we really should have won last year.  So, it feels good to finally win it after knocking on the door,” commented David Apthorp. “This regatta has been really good, with close racing and pretty much the whole fleet at the same boat speed. Winning races comes down to tactics and boat handling. It would be nice to have more teams racing in the class, but of all the classes we have raced in, the J/88 is probably the most competitive, and consistency has been the key.”

    J/109 National Champion – Joe Henry's JOLLY JACK TAR
    Five teams made the podium in the J/109 championship, won by JOLLY JACK TAR in the final leg of the final race. John Smart's JUKEBOX made the podium in every race to finish a worthy runner-up, and Neil Angel's DIAMOND JEM was third, just two points ahead of Simon Perry's JIRAFE. Chris Preston's JUBILEE scored a podium finish to end the regatta in fifth.

    “This is a different team from 2016, just two of us remain,” commented Joe Henry. “Never give up; perseverance is the key to winning. Going into the last race, we were about fourth in the last 100 metres, and we managed to squeeze in and take second, which was just enough to win the championship!”

    J/111 National Champion – Chris Jones & Louise Makin’s JOURNEYMAKER II
    SWEENY was top of the podium for the J/111 Class, but the Dutch team is not eligible for the UK National Championship. JOURNEYMAKER II was the top UK boat, finishing in second place for the class, with Sjaak Haakman's Dutch team on RED HERRING claiming third, just a point ahead of Michiel v/d Meulen's Swiss LALLEKONIG. Sebastian de Liedekerke's DJINN and Paul Griffiths' JAGERBOMB also scored podium race finishes.

    “Wasn't that great?  We are very happy,” smiled Chris Jones. “This has been a fantastic regatta, and most of all, we are delighted with the number of teams that travelled over from Northern Europe. I guess they want to test themselves before the J/111 Worlds this September, and the fleet for this regatta has been awesome.”

    J/70 Class Winner – Graham Clapp's JEEPSTER
    The 20-strong J/70 Class was hotly contested with seven teams making the podium over the six race series; it also marked the third event of the J/70 Grand Slam Series.

    Graham Clapp's JEEPSTER scored two race wins and discarded a fourth. Consistency was the name of the game, aided by world-class talent including NACRA 17 World Champion Ben Saxton, and Olympic 49er sailor Sophie Ainsworth. Geoff Carveth & Doug Struth's DSP was second, and Clive Bush's DARCEY was third (with 49er sailor John Pink calling tactics). Patrick Liardet's COSMIC finished the regatta with a 2-2 to place fourth and Paul Ward's EAT SLEEP J REPEAT scored a race win to finish fifth.

    “For years I was a 'trailer-dad' to my children Max and Sally, and 20 years after racing Darts, my wife told me I needed to get out of the garage, so she asked Max which boat to buy and he said a J/70,” commented Graham Clapp. “The team for this weekend have been coaching or racing with my children for many years, so we already have a good relationship. We made a few errors which did not cost us too badly, but to win in this field was amazing.”

    “We didn't have a very good first day, the top mark was very busy and, like other teams, we got caught in the pile up and in our discard race we didn't get a good start,” admitted Cosmic's Patrick Liardet. “The last day was really good with two second places, which we are very pleased with. Setting up the boat and how you steer it is very important and that takes lots of practice and application. The other element is trying to sail with the same crew to minimize mistakes, as the worst result tends to determine the outcome of a series.  Myself, Andy Page and Mike Johnson have been sailing together since 2010 in the J/80 and J/70 Class. Joining us this season is Billy Venniss-Ozanne, from Hill Head, who won the 2017 UK 29er Nationals, and has been sailing in the 49er with Olympic ambitions. I think it is great that the J/70 Class is attracting sailors like Billy.”  For more information about the J/70 UK Class.   Follow the J/70 UK Class on Facebook here  J/70 UK Sailing highlights here on YouTtube.

    IRC Class Winner – Chaz Ivill's J/112 DAVANTI TYRES
    DAVANTI TYRES won the class for the second year in a row but was pushed hard all the way by Mike & Sarah Wallis' J/122 JAHMALI, which won the last two races of the series to come runner-up. Mike Lewis' J/80 JESTER was on the podium for all but one race, to finish the regatta in third, and Angus Bates J/133 ASSARAIN IV also made the podium. Piotr Nahajski’s J/95 JOLLITY was fifth.

    “We had some really good teams to race against, and the variety of conditions and courses kept us on our toes the whole regatta,” commented Chaz Ivill. “I have hardly ever missed a J-Cup, because it is an outstanding event, and really well organized, which attracts a great bunch of people to come and race their team. Racing with lots of boats on the race course, was a great experience, and good practice for Cowes Week.”

    J/92 Class Winner - Robin Stevenson's UPSTART
    UPSTART held on to win the class by a single point from Jack Banks' NIGHTJAR. David Greenhalgh's J’RONIMO was always in contention but an OCS in Race 4 proved costly, with the team finishing third for the regatta. Guy Stansell's CAPTAIN SCARLETT and Ralph Mason's JABBERWOCK tied after time correction in Race 4, demonstrating the intensity of the racing in the J/92 Class.

    “You turn up, you give it a go and see what drops out the bottom, and fortunately for us we were the winners, so we are really pleased,” commented Robin Stevenson. “There is always great racing when the J/92s get together, they are not all the same but IRC tends to iron out the differences. I have to say that especially J’Ronimo and Nightjar sailed extremely well, it came down to one race in the end, and fortunately the win came our way.”

    The Regatta Supper and Final Prize Giving at the Cowes Event Centre was a fitting occasion to bring the 2018 Landsail Tyres J-Cup to a close. Key Yachting's Paul Heys was the Master of Ceremonies, and as winners came up for their prize, they were cheered on by the J-Boats family.  Party band “Groovejuice” played live on the main stage, the dance floor was spinning to tunes from the 60s right through to 2018, with some unorthodox maneuvers at the prize giving, which was a sell-out.”

    “The J-Cup is a marvelous way to enjoy very competitive racing with a lively crowd, and we always like a good knees-up after we pack the boats away,” commented Paul Heys. “Many of the teams come back year after year, and their enthusiasm is infectious with more teams joining us every year on their recommendation.”

    With thanks to the sponsors; Landsail Tyres, North Sails, B&G, Fusion, Fastnet Insurance, Grapefruit Graphics, Rigit, Harken, Wight Vodka, Dolphin Covers, Liquimoly, Frontline Image and MMC Divers.   Sailing photo credits- Tim Wright/ PhotoAction.com   For more Landsail Tyres J-Cup sailing information
     

    Fast, Windy FIGAWI Race
    J/121 ALCHEMY Takes the Silver!
    (Hyannisport, MA)- On Saturday morning, the 500+ sailors on the 180 boats participating in the 2018 edition of the FIGAWI Race were greeted by a solid 15-20 southwest breeze, making for a mostly starboard close reach/ fetch from Hyannis, MA on Cape Cod down to Nantucket Harbor.  The smaller boats did the “straight shot” course of 23nm and the big boats did the “long course” around enough buoys to make it 30+nm and included beats and reaching under spinnakers.  As has been tradition, a fair number of J/Teams collected some silverware in the famously huge prize-giving gala presentation on Sunday that seemingly takes all afternoon!

    The largest fleet of “J’s” were sailing PHRF Division S1; eight of the ten boats were J/Crews!  Loving the conditions was the newly launched J/121 ALCHEMY sailed by David Southwell; their team took 2nd place behind a TP52.  Here’s what David had to say about their experience:

    “The Figawi race from Hyannis to Nantucket was ALCHEMY’s first race to prepare for the Newport-Bermuda race, in fog and 15-20 knots of wind from the southwest.  Normally this would favor heavier boats, but ALCHEMY tracked beautifully both upwind for most of the race, and on the downwind leg using our A2/A4.  We took advantage of the rating benefit of not using the water ballast, and she handled well with eight crew.  After a good start using the pursuit format of Figawi, we kept overtaking the boats that had started before us, and finished second in class, out of 11.  ALCHEMY is almost dialed-in for Bermuda now, and we look forward to racing against our sisterships in two weeks!”

    ALCHEMY finished just 2:05 behind the TP52.  Taking third was Mark Verville’s J/120 ISURUS another 3:18 behind the J/121.  Fifth was Jimmy Masiero’s J/122 URSUS MARITIMUS another 4:20 behind them.

    The PHRF S2 Division was essentially a J/105 one-design class with three other boats mixed in for good measure.  Not surprisingly, the J/105s swept the top five!  Winning was Andrew Reservitz’s DARK’N’STORMY, second Mary Schmitt’s HARDTACK, third Ed Lobo’s WATERWOLF, fourth Joe Lloyd’s Nantucket High School Sailing Team on PRIMA, and fifth was Francis Dougherty’s LYRIC.

    In PHRF B Division, Kirk Brown’s J/40 JAZZ finished in fifth.  In PHRF C Division, Ira Perry’s J/29 SEEFEST got the bronze. Finally, in PHRF G Division, Bill Jones’ J/40 SMITTEN took a bronze, as well.  For more Figawi Race sailing information
     

    Super Fast Spinnaker Cup
    J/111 and J/105s Planing Downhill to Monterey!
    (Belvedere, CA)- Saturday’s 88.0nm race from San Francisco to Monterey witnessed 44 boats in 6 divisions, dancing out The Gate in heavy overcast, light winds and ample ebb. With a 40-minute delay for the 1st starters, while RC juggled a cavalcade of issues, including attempting to get the Yellow Brick Trackers to all the boats, squaring the line, and sharing the start area with a bundle of halibut fishermen hoping for fresh fish tacos to start their Memorial Day Weekend.

    When the 1st start commenced, the smaller boats with the higher ratings led the parade out of the bay and onto the brisk and lumpy Pacific. Early forecasts had insinuated steady winds in the 25+ knot range, so it appeared that the 2018 edition could be a fast one!

    For years, the Spinnaker Cup was started on a Friday to give crews ample time to enjoy the Monterey Bay and ease back into reality at a more civilized pace. In order to compress the California Offshore Race Week into a manageable 8-day affair, the Spinnaker Cup was pushed up a day and Saturday starts are the new norm. So, a quick jaunt down is just what the doctor ordered, and to help facilitate that, the tedious ride out the shipping channel to entrance Buoy 8 (Course 2) was discarded for the more direct course 1.

    Diners with window seats at the Cliff House and Beach Chalet were provided a bonus visual treat as the fleet hugged the coast around Seal Rocks, and sailed just outside the surf zone all along SF’s Ocean Beach before moving a tad offshore to clear the Montara Mountain dead air zone and setting kites off Half Moon Bay.

    Division E quickly became a dogfight with Jeff Thorpe’s J/111 MAD MEN matching jibes and tactics with the Azzura 310 Outsider, the Columbia 32 Six Brothers, and the C&C 30 Don’t Panic, the last 3 mentioned shadowing one another until a split at Pigeon Point where 6 Bros stayed offshore with Outsider and Don’t Panic chasing Velvet Hammer towards the shore seeking the increased pressure created by the Santa Cruz mountain ranges proximity to the shoreline.

    The forecast looked great going into the race, with all the models indicating that boats would set spins/ asyms past Mile Rock, gybe into Davenport, and depending on the time of day and cloud conditions, either take another hitch into Half Moon Bay, or go for the outside lane and gybe on the lay line to finish.

    For many of the top boats, offshore (8 miles or so) they found very steady winds, slowly building to about 23 knots with a moderate sea state. That made for great spinnaker conditions, with a fair amount of surfing under A2 and A4.  Towards late evening, after a few hours of sun, the wind began to wane, making for a more civilized approach to Monterey.  The wind began to die in earnest as the slower boats approached the finish.

    Sailing in PHRF E Division was Jeff Thorpe’s J/111 MAD MEN, enjoying a fast and very challenging race!  In the end, after sailing 88nm in blast reaching/ running conditions, the MAD MEN took the silver in by far the most competitive class in the race and 5th overall in fleet.  Their 9:55:36 elapsed time worked out to an 8.8 kts plus average over the race track!

    The duels in PHRF F Class were between a fleet of J/105s and Express 37s.  In the end, the Sergei Podshivalov’s J/105 JAVELIN took the bronze on the podium, just 19 minutes off winning it all!  Amazing for being the first modern asymmetric keelboat designed in 1992- 26 years ago! Classmate Chris Kim’s J/105 VUJA STAR was 4th just over 1:30 minutes behind, and Jim Goldberg’s J/109 JUNKYARD DOG was 5th another 8+ minutes back.  This group of boats covered the 88nm course at a 7.3 kts-plus average.   Thanks for contribution from Erik Simonson at Pressure-Drop.us   For more California Offshore Race Week sailing information
     

    J/Crews Sweep Swiftsure Race Divisions!
    75% of Top Sixteen- Cape Flattery Overall!
    (Victoria, BC, Canada)- Mother Nature denied spectators a spinnaker start, but it was otherwise a picture-perfect start to the 75th annual Swiftsure International Yacht Race.

    “It’s a westerly wind, so they’re going to sail into the wind. You don’t do that with a spinnaker,” explained announcer Michael Nussbaum over the radio and loudspeakers on shore.

    Hundreds of spectators gathered at Clover Point and along Dallas Road Saturday morning — some cozied up under blankets in lawn chairs, others armed with tripods supporting cameras or holding binoculars, and still others standing to watch the starts of the different races involving 198 sailboats.

    While some were regulars, others just stumbled upon the event.

    Fairfield residents Bob and Lynne McPherson, enjoying the pancake breakfast put on by the Central Saanich Lions, were simply out on their morning walk when they noticed the activity.

    “We saw the frigate out front, then we saw the trailers and decided this must be the Swiftsure. We hadn’t seen it for about 20 years, so we came down,” Bob McPherson said.

    Nussbaum said Swiftsure is a great race from a sailor’s perspective.

    “It’s very challenging— tides, currents, winds, the courses— something you don’t get on other races,” said Nussbaum, who has long volunteered with the Swiftsure committee and sailed it several times. “The other thing is that Victoria puts on a heck of a party and the social part of it is very, very strong.”

    While very different from three decades ago, when more than 400 boats would enter, the race still has almost a magical ability to draw crowds to the waterfront.

    “When I moved here in the ‘70s it was the thing to do on the Memorial Day weekend. Victoria didn’t have a lot of major events … so this was it,” Nussbaum said.

    “But, it still is the biggest weekend in Victoria. It’s the biggest tourist weekend. It’s the No. 1 weekend for the summer!! Swiftsure is a big part of that, but there’s lots of other things going on, too.”

    The races start with sailboats crossing an invisible line marked by orange flags raised on shore and on HMCS Nanaimo.

    “They want to be going full speed as they hit the line when the gun goes, without going over,” Nusbaum told spectators, adding that in a long race, the start is for the crowd.

    “In a 100-mile race, the start is actually a really small piece. It’s great for spectators. You want to do your best, but at the end of the day, it’s really going to be your tactics out there that are going to matter.”

    The Swiftsure International Yacht Race was first held in 1930 and featured only six boats. Save for a few halts for world events, the Great Depression and the Second World War, the race has continued.

    The first Swiftsure Lightship Classic was named for a lightship, a floating lighthouse once anchored by the U.S. Coast Guard at Swiftsure Bank to mark the entrance to Juan de Fuca Strait.

    The lightship was a convenient marker for yachts to use as turn-around point. That light is especially important, as the sailboat racers would be out on the Pacific after dark. The lightship has long been retired, but this year, the spot was marked by HMCS Nanaimo.

    The strait has always provided interesting winds and challenges. Pacific winds are funneled, compressed and speeded up as they move between the Olympic Mountains to the South and Vancouver Island to the north.

    Those land formations create unique thermal winds. The sun heats up the land on other side of the strait, causing air to rise and create a breeze. But Swiftsure is an overnight event, so when the sun goes down, those thermal breezes slack off and sails sag.

    Another frequent challenge arises when the boats sailing in the Lightship Classic leave Juan de Fuca Strait and venture upon the Pacific Ocean. Instead of encountering breezes sped up by the geographic tunnel effect, boats must deal with those over the sea. Sails often sag and flutter.

    Then again, maybe neither funneled winds nor thermal breezes arise, whatever the time of day. Some years, the wind just never comes, and resulting contests have been dubbed “the Driftsure.”

    Vern Burkhardt, Swiftsure event chairman, said race organizers never stopped re-examining the event and devising new challenges. Burkhardt said the first to come was the Cape Flattery Race, followed by others.

    Three years ago, the Hein Bank event was devised. It gives enough distance to offer racers some significant navigation challenges, but deletes the tricky sojourn onto the open Pacific.

    This year’s 75th edition started on May 26th off the waterfront park in beautiful Victoria, British Columbia. Several J/Crews ventured forth and came home with arms loaded with silverware to show for their hard work offshore.  Here is what happened in each of the races.

    Cape Flattery Race- 101.9nm
    By far the largest contingent of J/Crews was in this race- thirty-five J/crews participating (20% of the fleet)!  The outcome for that J/Armada was no less than spectacular, as well.  Out of the top sixteen boats Overall, twelve were J’s (75%) from across the spectrum of time and design- J/35 and J/105 to J/111 and J/122E.  A remarkable performance by the crews.  Here are the Overall Cape Flattery Race results:
    • 2nd- Scott Campbell’s J/46 RIVA
    • 3rd- Christina Wolfe’s J/120 SHEARWATER
    • 4th- John Murkowski’s J/122E JOY RIDE
    • 5th- Alex Smyth’s J/111 65 RED ROSES II
    • 8th- Jim Geros’ J/105 LAST TANGO
    • 9th- Don Leighton’s J/35 TAHLEQUAH
    • 10th- Chuck Stephens’ J/105 PANIC
    • 11th- Doug Schenk’s J/105 FREE BOWL OF SOUP
    • 12th- Chris Phoenix’s J/105 JADED
    • 13th- Jim Prentice’s J/109 DIVA
    • 15th- Tom Sitar’s J/109 SERENDIPITY
    • 16th- Mark Hansen’s J/109 MOJO
    Breaking down the various performances by division in the Cape Flattery Race, it was basically clean sweeps of L1, L2, L3 Divisions across the board, an unprecedented performance by a wide variety of boats and crews, including a “first ever” performance by a woman owner/ skipper against the top offshore teams in the Pacific Northwest!
    • H1 Division
    • 2nd- Scott Campbell’s J/46 RIVA
    • 6th- Ron MacKenzie’s J/37 FUTURE PRIMITIVE
    • 8th- Tom Keffer’s J/42 VELOCITY
       
    • L1 Division
    • 1st- Christina Wolfe’s J/120 SHEARWATER- first woman owner/skipper to win
    • 2nd- John Murkowski’s J/122E JOY RIDE
    • 3rd- Alex Smyth’s J/111 65 RED ROSES II
    • 7th- Chris Johnson’s J/120 WITH GRACE
    • 8th- Bob Brunius’ J/120 TIME BANDIT
    • 9th- Mike Picco’s J/120 WILD BLUE
    • 11th- Ron Holbrook’s J/133 CONSTELLATION
    • 12th- Tom Kelly’s ANAM CARA
       
    • L2 Division
    • 1st- Don Leighton’s J/35 TAHLEQUAH
    • 2nd- Jim Prentice’s J/109 DIVA
    • 4th- Tom Sitar’s J/109 SERENDIPITY
    • 5th- Mark Hansen’s J/109 MOJO
    • 6th- Jason Vannice’s ALTAIR
       
    • L3 Division- J/105s
    • 1st- Jim Geros’ LAST TANGO
    • 2nd- Chuck Stephen’s PANIC
    • 3rd- Doug Schenk’s FREE BOWL OF SOUP
    • 4th- Chris Phoenix’s JADED
    • 5th- Doug Pihlaja’s ABSTRACT
    Hein Bank Race- 118.1nm
    Only one J/team sailed the second longest race; that is the famous navy-blue J/160 JAM sailed by John McPhail’s race-winning crew from Seattle and Gig Harbor YC.  Grinding it out with TP52’s, they were 2nd on provisional handicap time at the first turning mark 51.65nm into the race- primarily upwind.  Then, the turbo’d TP52s took off downwind.  Despite their enormous off-wind advantage, JAM still took a 4th in class, less than 1.5 hours corrected time from the silver!  Amazing, considering all the furniture and comforts they were hauling around the course!  Note- the J/160 has a gorgeous varnished teak interior, Ultrasuede cushions, heaters, wine bar/cooler, stove/oven, two enclosed heads the envy of multi-million dollar mansions, a navigation station worthy of some superyachts, an ice-maker that can feed an army of thirsty crew hell-bent on making gallons of The Oar’s famous top-shelf “mudslide”.  The TP52’s?  Hmmm.  Carbon bunks, carbon toilet (e.g. bucket), bunsen burner, no heat, no ice, no headroom, carbon weave bunks, what nav station? Pick your poison; no wonder McPhail has no problem getting enthusiastic, talented crew on the J/160 JAM; especially in the Pacific Northwest’s notoriously cool, misty, energy-robbing conditions offshore.

    Juan de Fuca Race- 78.7nm
    This race had some of the J/classics from the beginning of time back in the early 1980’s- J/30s and J/35s.  In the end, they all had solid performances across the board.  In L1 Division, taking 3rd was Walt Meagher’s J/35 SUNSHINE GIRL. And, in the L2 Division, 3rd was Colin Bishop’s J/30 REDUX and 7th was John Collins’ J/30 SPUD.

    Here is an amusing sailing video of a J/105 rounding the Neah Bay marker- the HMSC NANAIMO.  IMHO, shouldn’t they have launched the spinnaker on starboard tack, then done a gybe around the big ship?? Just sayin’.  A useful training video on how to do mark roundings better.   Sailing photo credits- John Clarke and Jan Anderson/ JanPix   Thanks for contribution from the Victoria Times Colonist- photos by Darren Stone and story by Richard Watts   For more Swiftsure International Yacht Race sailing information
     

    Brevik SC Leads Norwegian J/70 Sailing League
    (Bodø, Norway)- "The best games ever," Juan Antonio Samaranch, said after the Lillehammer Olympics in 1994 hosted in Norway. The same words lay on many lips after the elite racing round in Bodø, Norway.

    "The cooperation with Bodø Sailing Association was a delight," says Magnus Hedemark, league manager at SailLogic.  "They really took the event's intention seriously and engaged local business, the audience and the local press. They had a huge cadre of volunteers. Wherever you turned, you saw an orange vest with Bodø Seilforening. It was simply impressive to see what they had done to support the regatta. It was fun to come to Bodø, to get involved,” Hedemark says.

    The Bodø organizers had a stadium-sized big screen down at the harbor where live broadcasts were broadcast and where SAP's graphics were displayed. In the same place, the business community had cars, banking services and samplings of local seafood- fabulous and delicious!

    "We had a lot of people that attended, good wind for the sailors and cool temperatures. The best part was that the sailboats were visible right in front of the waterfront.  And, when the Bodø Sailing team was on fire over the weekend, the audience enjoyed it," said Remi Rasmussen from Bodø Seilforening.

    After a dozen races for each of the fifteen teams participating, it was apparent that consistency was necessary to break into the top five, a mistake here or there for just one or two boats was going to be very costly for the top teams.

    In the end, it was the Brevik Seilforening team of Dag Usterud, Nils Petter Hovemoen, Oscar Widestam, Ole Martin, and Lunde Lidal that topped the leaderboard by a mere point over their nemesis- RAN Seilforening.  Finishing in third was the Tønsberg Seilforening with 25 pts.

    "There is no doubt that the level has been higher and more consistent than last year, something that Åsgårdstrand and Moss, the two dominant associations in 2017, proved to be. Now, those top two teams from last year only managed 5th and 6th place this regatta,” says Magnus Hedemark.

    The winning skipper, Dag Usterud, was particularly impressed with the youngsters from Tønsberg and Risør that finished 3rd and 4th, respectively.

    "It was fun to see how good the young sailors from Tønsberg and Risør have become. It's been a long time since I've met such good young sailors out on the track like them!  We hope to see more of them, they learn fast!  We need to support them and help them grow faster as sailors,” he said.  Follow the Norwegian J/70 Sailing League here on Facebook  For more Norwegian J/70 Sailing League scoring information on SAP SAILING.com  For more Norwegian J/70 Sailing League information
     

    Frederikshavn Leads Danish J/70 Sailing League
    (Frederikshavn, Denmark)- The 2018 Danish J/70 Sailing League kicked off last weekend in Frederikshavn.  The local Frederikshavn Sailing Club hosted the event over the May 26-27 weekend for eighteen teams from across Denmark.  The fleet was treated to two good days of sailing, enabling them to complete eleven races for the two days in the fleet of six boats, with teams rotating for every race.

    The pre-regatta favorites included the Royal Danish YC KDY Team with four-time Olympic legend Michael Hestbæk as skipper. Hestbæk had previously sailed- and won- the Champions League with KDY, but this was his first time skippering.  The Horsens Sailing Club crew was also formidable last season and their team this year was Jakob Nicolajsen, Jeppe Bregendahl, Mikkel Hougaard and Andreas Skjerning.  Then, the host club's own team were defending two-time Danish J/70 Sailing League champions; their team this year was comprised of Rasmus Damsgaard, Søren Steen, Rasmus Melsen and Captain Kris Houmann.

    After the eleven races were completed, it was apparent the epic duel brewing between KDY and Frederikshavn Sejklub would continue to grow in intensity from the very first race of the first day.  Both clubs won virtually all their races in their heats during the rotations.  Frederikshavn won seven races, took two 2nd and two 3rds, and won the event with just 17 pts total.  Not lacking for competitiveness, the KDY SHARKS won their last two races to add to their three 1sts to take second on the podium with 20 pts total.  Finally, the SEAHORSENS finished in third with 26 pts total.

    "A fantastic event and great support from our home town club members! The event has lived up to everything we could hope for and we are thankful for achieving victory at sea, at home! Amazing!,” said Rasmus Melson, crew member for Frederikshavn Sailing Club.

    New record- fifth league victory!
    It was the fifth time in the league history that Frederikshavn won a competition in the Sailing League. No one has performed better- Hellerup Sailing Club comes closest with four wins.

    KDY’s famous Danish skipper- Michael Hestbæk- sailed fast and smart but two fourth places in earlier flights ultimately cost them crucial points in their bid to overtake Frederikshavn.

    Horsens Sailing Club team improved their overall performance quite dramatically. Skipper Peter Warrer commented that their club’s recent purchase of three J/70s made an enormous difference in the team’s preparation and training for the first event of the 2018 season.   Singing Cheerleaders on-shore at Danish J/70 Sailing League!   Sailing Highlights League promo video for 2018   Follow the Danish J/70 Sailing League here on Facebook   For Danish J/70 Sailing League scores on SAP Sailing site   For more Danish J/70 Sailing League information
     

    CHAOTIC Crowned British J/24 Champion
    (Poole, United Kingdom)- An enthusiastic and incredibly strong fleet of twenty-one J/24 teams showed up at the Poole Regatta to sail for their 2018 U.K. National Championship.  The crew at Poole YC did a magnificent job of running nine races over the three days in absolutely stunning weather conditions- sun and good breeze!

    The regatta went down to the wire for the duel that started right out of the gate on the first day.  The two protagonists were Nick Phillips CHAOTIC and Duncan McCarthy’s MADELEINE, both hailing from the same Parkstone YC!  McCarthy’s MADELEINE threw down the gauntlet first, winning the first race, with CHAOTIC taking 2nd.  Then, as if sharpening their swords a bit more, CHAOTIC won the next two races in succession, with MADELEINE getting the short end of that stick with their two 2nds.  Then, things got interesting between these dueling Parkstoners for the next few races.  In the fourth race, McCarthy got black-flagged, then snapped back in ensuing races 5 to 8 with a 4-1-4-4 tally to be leading with 18 pts with a toss race (his BFD).  Meanwhile, Phillips’ crew on CHAOTIC started sailing erratically and chaotically, posting a 4-9-7-2-5 for those same five races to drop to 2nd place with 22 pts (including tossing the 9th). As a result, the final race was going to determine everything between these two teams, not the least bragging rights back at the Parkstone YC bar afterwards!  Both teams had their daggers out for each other, with Phillips’ CHAOTIC crew rising to the occasion to score an 11th (their toss race) versus McCarthy’s MADELEINE getting DSQ’d (their earlier BFD/20 pts being their toss).  CHAOTIC won with 31 pts net to MADELEINE’s 32 pts net.

    Watching this duel with breathless anticipation was Jim Torr’s MAJIC team from Saltash Sailing Club, hoping the two regatta leaders would simply self-destruct.  Amazingly, after getting only two podium finishes, the MAJIC crew leapt onto the podium, happy as can be, with 43 pts net.  Not loving that outcome was Giles Kuzyk’s crew on TEAM IMPACT U25, an under 25 yrs old youth team. They were fast, but quite erratic, posting a roller-coaster scoreline of 8-10-10-1-1-6-8-2-10 for 46 pts net- the last race knocking them out of contention for the podium, but having to settle for 4th place.  Nevertheless, there’s clearly talent on their team and they have a bright future for their sailing this summer.  Rounding out the top five was Shane Hewlett’s MOJOSI with 52 pts net.  For more UK J/24 Nationals sailing information
     

    J/120 ILLYRIA Flies in Epic Gulfstreamer Race
    (Daytona Beach, FL to Charleston, SC)- Hosted and organized by the Halifax River YC in Daytona Beach, FL, the 11th Biennial Gulfstreamer Offshore Challenge took place on Memorial Day weekend. The race, from Daytona Beach to Charleston, SC, covers 226 miles, and has been recognized as the most prestigious offshore sailing event in Central Florida and the Southeastern Atlantic Coast. What is unusual about it’s format is that it is characterized by the “Race within a Race” concept and its long range tactical difficulties.  The race from Ponce Inlet to the Main Street pier is 10nm long, the sprint “race within a race” portion, gives every crew two chances at winning.

    The weekend started off on Thursday, May 24 with the traditional Rum Party- it is a wildly popular event for the crews, according to many sailors that survived to tell the tale. It might as well been described as the Sub-Tropical Storm Alberto Party!

    The race itself started on Friday, May 25 and ended up being a fast race due to the forecasted near-gale-force winds from the southeast. NOAA’s predictions were for widespread showers and squalls on Friday, winds from the ESE to SE 19-27 kts, gusting to 40 kts.  By nightfall and going into Saturday, the winds would diminish somewhat and veer from SE to SW as a result of Alberto’s movements NNE, blowing 20-26 kts, gusting to 35 kts, with scattered showers and squalls.

    The weather was tailor-made for John Keenan’s J/120 ILLYRIA from Charleston, SC.  While taking a 3rd on the short 10nm sprint to the inlet, they simply knocked it out of the park on the offshore 216nm leg, the J/120 reveling in the rough, windy, gigantic waves, posting a corrected time of 24:02:06 to win that leg and the race overall! 

    The ILLYRIA crew led a fun and raucous awards ceremony and celebration at the Charleston Yacht Club on Sunday afternoon. Congratulations to Keenan and crew for a job well done in challenging weather conditions.  For more Gulfstreamer Race sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
    * The J/109 JUNKYARD DOG and her Dog Pound crew have another sailing video of their experience in the Spinnaker Cup Race from San Francisco Bay to Monterey Bay offshore.

    According to JUNKYARD DOG’s owner, Jim Goldberg, “It was a very pleasant & casual trip down the Pacific coast this year, with enough wind and swell to make things fun and interesting, but never too much.  Unfortunately, that doesn't offer up a whole lot of crash and burn video footage!

    We had a strong start, but dropped the ball when we choose the A6 asym spinnaker over the A4 asym spinnaker as the winds shifted aft.  Besides, it being slower than the A4, I think there just wasn't enough wind to carry the chicken chute deep enough.  I'm still recovering from my SF Bay induced PTSD where it's never a question of "if" it will blow 30+, but "when".  Our area has a way of keeping even the bravest sailors quite humble.  We had a brand new 20-minute-old kite evaporate into thin air at the end of last year’s season on the Bay when a 40-knot gust pinned us on our ear! Ouch!!  There must be some sort of support group in SF Bay for similar sailors suffering from SF Bay induced PTSD, I just need to find them! Races like this are also very good for the soul and confidence!"

    Enjoy the J/109 sailing video here on YouTube
    https://youtu.be/8w0qRvY0cEI

    * Jim Bishop, owner of the famous, Caribbean-green J/44 GOLD DIGGER passed away this week.  The Commodore of American Yacht Club, home for Jim’s fleet of boats, offered their condolences to the Bishop family and friends:

    “It is with deep sadness that I inform you Jim Bishop Sr. passed away peacefully with his family at his side Thursday, May 24th. Racing his IOD “Makai,” his J/44 “Gold Digger,” and spending time with family and friends on the “Coastal Queen” out of American YC were some of the things he cherished most. Even during his last weeks, he was looking forward to this summer’s racing, and God Willing- the Bermuda Race on his lovingly maintained J/44 GOLD DIGGER. We will all remember him for his generous spirit, perpetual storytelling and that twinkle in his eye.”

    Jim was a big fan of the J/Boats team, having worked with Bob Johnstone, in particular, on creating, fostering, and supporting the J/44 One-Design Class; it was modeled on the same principals as the International One-Design class, another fleet that he enjoyed sailing since his youth.  The concept met with great success and the multitude of J/44 owners and the J/Boats team will greatly miss Jim’s enthusiasm and support of the J/44 class.  May his spirit live on sailing the great Gold Digger in the sky.
    Add to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • J/Newsletter- May 23rd, 2018 Storm Trysail Block Island Race Preview
    (Larchmont, NY)- If it's Memorial Day, that must mean its time for two all-time classic events in the northeast, the Storm Trysail Club’s annual Block Island Race and the Hyannis YC and Nantucket YC’s annual FIGAWI Bash!

    Starting on May 25th, the STC BI Race begins in the afternoon on the Friday of Memorial Day Weekend – it is a 186nm race from Stamford, CT down Long Island Sound, around Block Island, RI and back to Stamford. A shorter, 125nm inside-the-Sound course to Plum Island for smaller/slower boats is offered as well.

    For many racing yachts and crews, the race is an annual rite of passage. For Newport Bermuda Race years (such as this one), it’s a perfect tune-up opportunity for crews to work out the kinks in their watch systems, reacquaint themselves with night racing, shake-down the rigging and learn how best to trim new (or old!) sails.  Generally, most of the fleet finishes late Saturday night or the early hours of Sunday morning.  But, of course, that all depends on the wind, the currents, the weather and the crew.

    The Block Island Race was first held in 1946 and it is a qualifier for the Northern Ocean Racing Trophy (IRC), the Double Handed Ocean Racing Trophy (IRC), the New England Lighthouse Series (PHRF), and the Gulf Stream Series (IRC). The Block Island Race is also a qualifier for the Caper, Sagola, and Windigo trophies awarded by the YRA of Long Island Sound and the 'Tuna' Trophy for the best combined IRC scores in the Edlu (40%) and the Block Island Race (60%).

    Last year, sixty-one boats finished the course which started in a light but building breeze. Despite the “nattering nabobs of negativism”, regarding forecasted wind speed, the race turned into a fairly quick and quite pleasant event.

    This year’s entry list is up quite dramatically, with eighty-five boats registered; seventeen of them are J/Crews (20% of the fleet).  Leading the charge in IRC 1 Doublehanded class is Gardner Grant’s well-traveled J/120 ALIBI from Westport, CT.

    In the nine-boat PHRF 3 Class, vying for class supremacy will be a four J/crews, Fred Allardyce’s J/40 MISTY, Carl Olsson’s J/109 MORNING GLORY, and two J/105s- Hobie Ponting’s PRIVATEER and Frank Conway’s RAPTOR.

    Three J/Crews will be gunning for the podium in PHRF 5 Class.  Two J/120s will duel (Brian Spears’ MADISON and Rick Oricchio’s ROCKET SCIENCE) with a J/124 (Bill Ingraham’s TENEBRAE from Larchmont YC.

    IRC 3 Class has five J/teams participating in what appears to be a quite competitive ten-boat fleet.  Two every experienced J/44s (Chris Lewis’ KENIA and Len Sitar’s VAMP) will fight with two fast J/122s (David Cielusniak’s J-CURVE and Jack Gregg’s TARAHUMARA) and hope the lightning quick J/111 (John Donovan’s LIBERTAS) from Southport, CT doesn’t upset their larger brethren.

    The first major race for Steve Levy’s brand new J/121 EAGLE will be in eight-boat IRC 4 Class.  They are up against a host of the top boats on Long Island Sound, including Dale & Mike McIvor’s J/133 MATADOR.

    Finally, the lone wolf flying the J/flag in IRC 5 Class will be Brian Prinz’s J/125 SPECTRE from Branford YC in East Haven, CT.  For more Storm Trysail Club Block Island Race sailing information
     


    The FIGAWI Race Preview
    (Hyannisport, MA)- The other annual right of spring for sailors in the northeast is the amazingly fabulous and fun-loving pursuit race called “the FIGAWI”.  It is serious fun, camaraderie, sailing, and most of all, charity… that is what FIGAWI is all about.

    The Race attracts over 150 boats each year. Thousands of sailors convene for the New England’s first major regatta to kickoff summer. The Figawi Charity Race is recognized as a premier sailing event not only on the east coast but is known nationally as well as internationally. The Charity Ball is held the weekend before the race. A premier event featuring a live band, great DJ, a sampling from eleven local restaurants, and a fabulous silent auction and raffle.

    The race starts on Saturday morning, May 26th, just outside of Hyannis Port harbor mouth.   The fleet of 180 sailboats (of which 20 are J/teams’s) will all have a pursuit-style start, meaning the first boat (with the slowest rated PHRF handicap) takes off promptly at 0900 hrs and about three hours after that, the last and fastest boat starts.  In years past, J/Crews have had more than their fair share of silverware in this race.  It often can be a wild and woolly fast 23.5nm reach (~ 155 deg heading) across Vineyard Sound to the finish line at the picturesque lighthouse at the opening of Nantucket Harbor.

    Eight of the ten boats in PHRF S1 Division are J/crews.  Four J/120s will be taking on their J/colleagues- Dave Follett’s GLORY, Rich Pierce’s MOOSE, Mark Verville’s ISURUS, and Coleman Brown’s RUCKUS.  Their three larger, faster members of the J/sable include Jimmy Maseiro’s J/122 URSUS MARITIMUS, Dave Southwell’s brand new J/121 ALCHEMY (her inaugural race!), and Chris Lund’s J/133 JUMP.

    The same scenario holds true for PHRF S2 Division, with six of seven boats being J/crews!  Five J/105s will be going across the starting line at the same time (!), including Joe Lloyd’s Nantucket High School Sailing Team on PRIMA, Andrew Reservitz’s DARK’N’STORMY, Mary Schmitt’s HARDTACK, Ed Lobo’s WATERWOLF, and Francis Dougherty’s LYRIC.  Fighting them off from crossing before them will be Andrew Meincke’s J/97 ADRENALINE (they will start with only a 4.75 minutes advantage).

    In the “big boat” PHRF A Division will be Dick Egan’s beautiful (and successful) J/46 WINGS.  In PHRF B Division is Mike Hersey’s J/35 RESILIENCE.  PHRF Division C will have to contend with the classic offshore speedster- Ira Perry’s J/29 masthead called SEEFEST (a past race winner).  Racing a bunch of other cruisers in PHRF G Division will be Bill Jones’ J/40 SMITTEN from Eastern YC in Marblehead, MA. Tom Ellis’ J/34C COVERAGE will be cruising fast in PHRF H Division.  Mark Barrett’s J/30 MOJO is hoping to terrorize PHRF M Division.  For more Figawi Race sailing information
     

    Spinnaker Cup Offshore Race Preview
    (Belvedere, CA)- This weekend, the 3rd running of the California Offshore Race Week will start the first of the three leg California Offshore Race Week.  The Spinnaker Cup, an 88nm sprint from San Francisco to Monterey departs May 26. Then, boats will embark on Monday May 28th for the 204nm gear busting Big Sur Tour, a.k.a. Coastal Cup that takes the fleet to Santa Barbara YC where they will relax for a short stay. The event concludes with the 245nm SoCal 300 that will lead them through the Channel Islands and down to San Diego, beginning on Thursday May 31.

    Since the CORW is comprised of 3 offshore legs with an evening beer-can race tossed in at Santa Barbara YC, the majority of the entrants will participate in just one or two of the legs. In fact, there are eight J/Teams all sailing in just the Spinnaker Cup Offshore race from San Francisco Bay down to Monterey Bay.

    Sailing in PHRF D Division will be Richard Pipkin’s J/125 CAN’T TOUCH THIS.  Sailing in PHRF E Division are Jeff Thorpe’s J/111 MAD MEN, Tracy Rogers’ J/120 HOKULANI and Timo Bruck’s J/120 TWIST.  Finally, in PHRF F Division, two J/105s (Sergei Podshivalov’s JAVELIN and Chris Kim’s VUJA STAR) will be competing with Jim Goldberg’s J/109 JUNKYARD DOG and Kevin Mills’ J/36 DAWNS EARLY LIGHT for class bragging rights.  Thanks for contribution from Erik Simonson  For more California Offshore Race Week sailing information
     

    Swiftsure International Yacht Race Preview
    (Victoria, BC, Canada)- The third Memorial Day classic has to be the premiere offshore race in the Pacific Northwest- the world-famous Swiftsure International Yacht Race!  Starting on May 26th off the waterfront park in beautiful Victoria, British Columbia, 171 yachts will be doing their best to achieve fame and fortune on one of the three races- the classic Swiftsure Lightship Race of 138.2nm, the Hein Bank Race of 118.1nm, the Cape Flattery Race of 101.9nm, and the Juan de Fuca Race of 78.7nm.

    Cape Flattery Race
    By far the most popular choice for the thirty-five J/crews participating (20% of the fleet) in the overall event is the Cape Flattery Race, twenty-six in total going the 101nm sprint around the Juan de Fuca Straits!  Six of them are J/105s, with most of the top teams sailing, such as Doug Pihlaja’s ABSTRACT, Doug Schenk’s FREE BOWL OF SOUP, Chuck Stephens’ PANIC, Jim Geros’ LAST TANGO, Chris Phoenix’s JADED, and the 2017 Fleet Champion- Erik Kristen’s MORE JUBILEE.

    Similarly, there are five J/109s racing, including Mike Picco’s WILD BLUE, Jim Prentice’s DIVA, Tolga Cezik’s LODOS, Mark Hansen’s MOJO and Tom Sitar’s SERENDIPITY.

    Sailing in one big division will be some very experienced offshore crews, such as Alex Smyth’s J/111 65 RED ROSES II, three J/120s (Bob Brunius’ famous TIME BANDIT, Justin Wolfe’s SHEARWWATER, & Chris Johnson’s WITH GRACE), two J/122’s (Tom Kelly’s ANAM CARA & John Murkowski’s JOY RIDE), Ron Holbrook’s J/133 CONSTELLATION, and Scott Campbell’s J/46 RIVA. 

    Finally, in this race will be a fleet of classic J’s, including three J/35s (George Leighton’s TAHLEQUAH, Jason Vannice’s ALTAIR, & Andrei Vassilenko’s AORANGI), Willie Wong’s J/36 HARWAR, Tom Keffer’s J/42 VELOCITY, Ron MacKenzie’s J/37 FUTURE PRIMITIVE, and Phil Wampold’s J/92 ZAFF.

    Hein Bank Race
    There is only one J/team that will be participating in the second longest race, the 118.1nm Hein Bank Race; that is the famous navy-blue J/160 JAM sailed by John McPhail’s race-winning crew from Seattle and Gig Harbor YC.

    Juan de Fuca Race
    There will be four J/crews sailing in the 78.7nm Juan de Fuca Race.  Two of them are J/30s (John Collins’ SPUD and Colin Bishop’s REDUX) and others are Adrian King-Harris’ J/33 “J” and Walt Meagher’s J/35 SUNSHINE GIRL.

    Inshore Racing
    Finally, in what amounts to some fun and frolic along the buoys that skirt the pretty Victoria Harbor waterfront will be three J/teams; Tom Kerr’s J/105 CORVO, Ed Pinkham’s J/109 JEOPARDY, and Bart Blainey’s J/30 LIMELIGHT.  For more Swiftsure Race sailing information
     

    J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    It was a busy week for both offshore and one-design round the cans J/sailors in Europe and in the Americas.  Starting in the United Kingdom, the RORC’s Vice Admiral’s Cup took place last weekend off its Cowes, Isle of Wight, clubhouse.  Sailing on the fabled Solent, one-design classes of J/109s and J/111s enjoyed three days of very competitive sailing.  Just west of London, the Royal Thames YC Cumberland Cup, a biennial event sailed in J/80s on the Queen Mary Reservoir next to the famous Heathrow International Airport, finally came to a conclusion; the event was hosted by the Queen Mary Sailing Club- a 2-on-2 team racing event that took place for four days. Just across the English Channel (La Manche), the North Sea Regatta, hosted by the Jachtclub Scheveningen and the RORC was sailed for ORC/IRC handicap fleets that included J/105, J/109s, J/122s and also one-design classes for J/22s and J/80s. Further northeast from there, the Swedish J/70 Sailing League (Allsvenskan) had eighteen teams sailing in a fleet of ten J/70s off Malmo, Sweden.  Heading further east, we find the Russian J/70 Sailing League had twenty-seven teams from all over Russia sailing off the beautiful Konakovo River Club northwest of Moscow.

    In the America’s, the J/70 North American Championship was held “south of the border” for the first time ever, sailed on a gorgeous mountain lake and hosted at Club de Vela La Peña in Valle de Bravo, Mexico for a fleet of thirty-two boats. Out West on the Pacific Ocean, the Santa Barbara YC and Pierpont YC (Ventura) held their Hardway Race, a 47nm sprint from Santa Barbara, around Anacapa Island and finish off Ventura Pier; sailing were a pair of J/111s, J/125, J/30, a pair of J/100s, and a pair of J/24s.  North of them in San Francisco Bay, it was another epic “blowing dogs off chains” weekend for the Elite Keel Regatta at San Francisco YC for J/70s and J/105s and at the J/22 U.S. Match Race Qualifier for seven teams at St Francis YC.

    Down in South America, we get a report from Chile regarding how the newly organized J/80 fleet enjoyed the “Frutillar Cup” sailed on Llanquihue Lake high in the Andes Mountains off Frutillar, Chile.

    Read on! The J/Community and Cruising section below has many entertaining stories and news about J/Sailors as well as cruising blogs about those who continue to enjoy the Caribbean and the South Pacific, staying warm while others are trying to stay warm up north.  Check them out!  More importantly, if you have more J/Regatta News, please email it or  upload onto our J/Boats Facebook pag  Below are the summaries.

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    May 24-28- J/Cup United Kingdom- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    May 25- Storm Trysail Block Island Race- Larchmont, NY
    May 25-28- The FIGAWI Race- Hyannisport, MA
    May 26- Spinnaker Cup Offshore Race- Belvedere, CA
    May 26-28- Swiftsure International Yacht Race- Victoria, BC, Canada
    May 26-28- U.K. J/24 National Championship- Poole, England
    May 28-29- Coastal Cup Race- Santa Barbara, CA
    May 31- SoCal 300 Race- San Diego, CA

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

    Challenging RORC Vice Admirals Cup
    JELVIS Jams J/111s, JIRAFFE Jumps J/109s
    (Cowes, IOW, England)- The Royal Ocean Racing Club’s first round-the-cans event each spring is the Vice Admiral’s Cup.  Hosted by their RORC Cowes clubhouse, the sailing takes place on the sunny, ferocious Solent waters, notorious for fickle winds and outrageous 2-4.5 knot currents just off the equally famous “the Castle” (home of the Royal Yacht Squadron).  This year, the J/109 and J/111 classes were invited to participate, with both showing up with strong fleets. Here is how it all went down over the three-day bank holiday weekend in England.

    Day One
    A long wait for a sea breeze gave way to a glorious afternoon of racing in sparkling sun for the opening day of the Vice Admiral’s Cup.

    It was a day of super-close racing, especially for the smaller boats. Racing for the seven classes was run from two committee boats in the central Solent. For the faster boats, PRO Stuart Childerley set windward/leeward courses starting on the southern edge of the Hill Head plateau, initially in a west southwesterly breeze of 10 knots that built to give gusts in the mid-teens.

    The second start, for the two one-design J/Classes, had the potential to be more congested, but many were line shy in the strong ebb stream that was carrying the fleet over the line. Tony Mack’s McFLY led the J/111 fleet into the first windward mark, 27 seconds ahead of Chris Jones’ JOURNEYMAKER II, who lost out through over-standing the layline. Hans Zwijnenburg’s Dutch crew on SWEENY rounded third, barely a length behind JOURNEYMAKER, neatly gybe-setting to head towards tidal relief in the shallow water of the Bramble Bank.

    While the leading group of Performance 40s judged the tricky cross-tide layline into the leeward gate accurately, the J/111s found it more difficult. McFLY again led into the mark, but approached against the tide at a low angle, giving scope for JOURNEYMAKER and SWEENY to eat into the leader’s advantage.

    By the end of the race Martin Dent’s JELVIS prevailed, ahead of SWEENY and McFLY. Dent also won the second race, ahead of Cornel Riklin’s JITTERBUG and SWEENY.

    The J/109 fleet saw, Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE win both races, with Christopher Preston’s JUBILEE second in both and David Richards’ JUMPING JELLYFISH third.

    Day Two
    After a relaxed start, the second day delivered yet more top-notch racing in bright, sunny weather. With a light east-south-easterly sea breeze established by lunchtime, the first of the day’s races got away just after 1300 hrs.

    The day was characterized by short, sharp races that proved a thorough test of both tactics and boat handling. Tight mark roundings and close finishes, including exact ties, were the order of the day.

    The J/109 fleet saw boats yo-yoing up and down the standings. In the first start Christopher Preston’s JUBILEE was well-placed mid-line, while David Richards’ JUMPING JELLYFISH and John Smart’s JUKEBOX were closer to the committee boat, with JELLYFISH hitting the line with speed and popping out ahead in clean air.

    Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE, which won all three races yesterday, was buried and tacked away onto port. Royal Navy Sailing Association’s JOLLY JACK TAR rounded the windward mark first, along with a gaggle of back markers in the J/111 fleet, with JUBILEE following close behind and JIRAFFE some six lengths back in third place. Perry continued to climb the fleet on the next lap of the course, to pull out a big lead on JOLLY TACK TAR by the second windward mark to win by an impressive margin. John Smart’s JUKEBOX took third place to gain his first podium finish of the event.

    In the next race, which was shortened at the leeward gate as the wind swung towards the south-west, saw Roger Phillips’ DESIGNSTAR 2 take the winner’s gun, fractionally ahead of JUBILEE, with JUMPING JELLYFISH taking another third.

    JIRAFFE went on to win the fifth race of the series, but at the start of the longer final race, much of the fleet misjudged the strength of the building ebb tide, with the result that a slew of boats, including JIRAFFE, were called OCS. Perry was able to discard his fourth in this race, but a win for Christopher Preston’s JUBILLE put the two boats only two points apart going into the final day. Speaking from a buoyant after-race party on the dock Preston said, “We had great racing today, in brilliant conditions,” and thanked the race team an excellent job in getting the racing away cleanly on both days.

    Martin Dent’s JELVIS, the 2016 J/111 World Champion, had a commanding start to the regatta, winning both races on the first day. Not everything went his way today, but he was generally at the front of the fleet when it mattered, winning three races and taking a second in the other. Hans Zwijnenburg’s SWEENY held a comfortable second place, with a seven-point margin on Chris Jones’ JOURNEYMAKER II.

    Day Three
    The Vice Admiral’s Cup has a long-standing reputation for providing exceptionally close competition. The final day of racing this year saw further intense racing, with most classes going to the wire, in a building southeasterly sea breeze.

    In the J/109 class Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE dominated the early part of the regatta, winning the first three races. However, Chris Preston’s JUBILEE led a strong challenge on the second day, leaving the leaders just two points apart at the start of the final day. In the first race, JUBILEE started with the upper hand and still held the lead at the end of the first lap. However, she lacked pace downwind and slipped to fifth on the final lap. JIRAFFE then went on to win the last race, finishing the series on nine points, with JUBILEE second on 15 and David Richards’ JUMPING JELLLYFISH third on 23 points.

    “It’s been a fantastic weekend in a very competitive, but friendly, fleet,” said Perry. “We first started racing against JUBILEE in Lendy Cowes Week last year– they are very quick, but we managed to stay ahead of them today, although they worried us this morning. We’ve got the boat going well, especially downwind, where we are deeper and faster. We also have a balanced crew that have sailed together for some time, which means the mechanics of maneuvers have been working really well.”

    Anyone looking at the overall results might assume that Martin Dent’s J/111 JELVIS had an easy ride to victory, thanks to his six race wins. However, the scoreboard belies the effort that went into those results. “Many of the races had multiple lead changes,” he said, “and we rounded almost every mark in company, which was really exciting. It’s a competitive fleet, with good sailors and well set-up boats, so you have to fight for every inch.  We’ve had a really enjoyable Vice Admiral’s Cup. It’s a key event in the J/111 calendar, with good courses for one-designs and great race management. They did a fantastic job in getting all eight races away with no wasted time, despite a minimal pressure gradient and spring tides.”  For more RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup sailing information
     

    J/Doublehanded Crews Sweep North Sea Regatta!
    Elsink Dominates J/80s, Holtrop Tops J/22s
    (Scheveningen, The Netherlands)- The North Sea Regatta completed the “inshore” portion of its ten-day long event.  Hosted by the Jachtclub Scheveningen, the North Sea Regatta is the largest event hosted in the Netherlands each year for a host of one-design classes (like J/22s and J/80s) and offshore ORC/IRC classes.

    The event kicked off on May 8th with the Vuurschepen Race, a North Sea Regatta Feeder Race that goes from the starting line off The Hague (Scheveningen) and goes across the North Sea to Harwich in the United Kingdom.  After a two-day layover, the fleet raced back in the RORC North Sea Race from Harwich to The Hague.  After a short breather, all keelboats including the J/22 and J/80 classes sailed from May 18th to 20th, Friday to Sunday on all inshore, round-the-buoy courses.

    Day One- May 18th
    It was a nice first race day today. The wind was stable with 10 to 12 knots. Three beautiful races could be sailed. With 60 boats on course A divided into 4 classes and 60 boats on course B also divided into 4 classes, it was great racing for all.

    Starting the 4 classes directly after each other, occasionally a general recall in between, the sailors had to pay attention not to miss their class’s turn to start. With a current that ran from North to South and the wind coming from the North, it was difficult to exactly time the starting line. In the first race of the event, all the teams had to get used to the circumstances. By the second race, you already notice that it was going a lot better, and the third it was like you had never done otherwise.

    Day Two- May 19th
    The starting boat for course A left the harbor early to get into position and to assess offshore conditions. The weather was a little gray and little wind, too little to start well and be able to lay out a good race course. The postponement flag (answering pennant) was hoisted. The first start was planned at 10:00. After a long hour of waiting, there was enough wind for to start. The IRC/ORC Two Handed Class started at 11:30 with a coastal race.

    Day Three- May 20th
    Waking up you had to check whether the boat next to you was still there because of the thick fog, usually a sign of little wind. The starting boat of course A quickly powered outside into the thick fog to assess whether the sailing yachts should go out for the races. Offshore it seemed good, but once all boats were out, it was difficult for the starting boat to find them. After an hour of waiting, a nice coastal course for the IRC/ORC Two-handed Class was laid out and their fleet started at 1100 hrs sharp.  Thereafter, it was impossible to start the other classes since you could not see the finish marks!  So, racing was canceled for the day.

    In the ORC/IRC Two-handed Class, it was a sweep of the podium by the leading all-star J/crews!  Winning class was none other than the most famous Dutch two-handed team; Robin Verhoef & John van der Starre’s J/122E AJETO. Their sistership took the silver, Chris Revelman & Pascal Bakker’s J/122 JUNIQUE/ RAYMARINE.  Completing the sweep in the bronze position was Wim van Slooten & Jochem Hamstra’s J/109 FIRESTORM!

    Afterwards, Robin Verhoef from the J/122E AJETO commented, “A wonderful closure of two weeks great sailing in the North Sea Regatta! For us, it was the 3rd time in a row to win the Dutch Two-handed Championship! In spite of today's fog, we still managed to find all the marks and our fifth race in a row! AJETO is amazing, a great boat!”

    In the ORC/IRC 2 Class, it was Alain Bornet’s J/109 JAI ALAI that took second place.  And, in the ORC Sportboats, Rikst Dijkstra’s J/70 NED 964 placed third in their fifteen-boat class.

    In the world of one-designs, it was Auke Holtrop’s NED 1223 that won the J/22 class with crew of Lotte Brasser, Sipke de Man, and Janneke Kampherbeek.  Second was NED 1514, skippered by Jesper Overbeeke with crew of Christiaan Feij, and Michelle Koopmans; it was a struggle for them to overcome a DNF and DSQ.  Third, just one point back, was NED 1295, helmed by Dirk Jan Verdoorn with crew of Rosemarijn Verdoorn, Liselotte Verdoorn, and Kim Bos.

    It was Nick Elsink’s J/80 NED 1137 that dominated their class with his crew of Jildau Horst, Pascal Meijer, and Wouter Toornstra.  Second place saw Otte Jan Golverdingen’s NED 838 crew of PP de Vries, Yves de Block, and Hans Edwin de Bruin win a tie-breaker on 17 pts each over Gerwin Jansen’s NED 8905 team of Douwe Broekens, Jolbert van Dijk, and Wouter Sonnema.  Sailing photo credits- Sander van der Borsch
    Follow the North Sea Regatta on Facebook here  For more North Sea Regatta sailing information
     

    REACH AROUND Crowned J/70 N.A. Champion!
    (Valle de Bravo, Mexico)- Thirty-two teams gathered for the J/70 North American Championship at Club de Vela La Peña in Valle de Bravo, Mexico. After four races on a spectacular first day, three American teams topped the leaderboard, commanded by Thomas Bowen’s REACH AROUND with 10 points after posting a 4-1-2-3 (onboard was 4x World Champion and College Sailor of the Year Bill Hardesty as tactician- a.k.a. the Dos Equis “world’s most interesting man”) . Oivind Lorentzen’s NINE held second place with 20 points, followed by Chris Snow’s MEXIGENICS with 23. Ignacio Perez’s ZAQUERO had the advantage in the Corinthian division.

    With sunny skies, warm temperatures and breeze around 8 knots, Ricardo Brockmann’s VINCITORRE opened the Championship with a victory, ahead of Yon Belausteguigoitia’s BULLET and Sebastian Halpern’s 707. Winds increased to about 11 knots in the next contest, when Bowen took the bullet, and Brockmann and Perez completed the top trio. Ander Belausteguigoitia’s BANDOOLA earned the race three victory as the breeze amped up again to 13 knots. Bowen and Snow followed.  Lorentzen ended the day on a positive note, while Snow and Bowen flopped second and third.

    Day Two- Another Glam Day
    It was another stellar day for Bowen’s REACH AROUND; following three consecutive bullets Thursday, Bowen added a 2-3 on Friday for a dominating 25-point lead heading into the final two races of the regatta. Bowen counts only scores in the top four of the 32-boat fleet, able to drop an eight, leaving him with 18 net points in 10 races so far. Lorentzen’s NINE maintained the silver position with 43 points, ahead of third place Belausteguigoitia’s BANDOOLA who had 55 points. Now leading the Corinthian division was Hector Guzman Gonzalez’s ESCIPION.

    Valle de Bravo delivered winds at a steady 10-14 knots and gusts to 17, with puffs and shifts keeping teams on their toes. Belausteguigoitia’s BULLET lived up to its name in the opening contest, trailed by Bowen and Diego Berho’s BBB. Fernando Stephan Gutierrez snagged the next win, with Snow’s MEXIGENICS and Bowen following.

    Day Three- Yawn! Picture Perfect, Again!
    The daily leader never changed over four days and twelve races. Bowen’s REACH AROUND commanded the 32-boat fleet and earned the privilege of returning to host Club de Vela La Peña in Valle de Bravo Mexico to watch the final race from ashore! With crew Jacolyn Wetmore, Alec Anderson and Bill Hardesty, Bowen won a third of the races and didn’t record a finish lower than 8 to end with 30 net points (discarding a DNC in race 12).

    Fellow American Lorentzen’s NINE sailed a solid series, but settled for second place with 46 points. Belausteguigoitia’s BANDOOLA displaced Snow’s MEXIGENICS to snag third place with 71 points.

    Winning the Corinthian division was Hector Guzman Gonzalez’s ESCIPION.  It was an all-Mexican affair for the podium in this division, with Perez’s ZAQUERO taking second and Manuel Vazquez’s CHAVORUCOS getting the bronze.

    Picture perfect conditions again greeted competitors on Saturday with winds at 10-14 knots. Fernando Stephan Gutierrez seized the first win of the day, with Lorentzen and Diego Berho’s BBB behind him. Lorentzen concluded the Championship on a high note winning the final race, followed by Chris Snow’s MEXIGENICS and Ignacio Perez’s ZAQUERO.  As a result, rounding out the top five on a tie-breaker at 83 pts each were Gutierrez taking the 4th on countback and Snow dropping ignominiously to 5th.  For more J/70 North American Championship sailing information and results
     

    Cape Crow YC Leads Swedish J/70 Sailing League
    (Malmo, Sweden)- The Swedish J/70 Sailing League's seasonal premiere took place in Malmö from the 18th to 20th of May. Eighteen teams from across Sweden participated in the event, the first of four competitions that include 1-3 June in Jungfrusund on Ekerö, outside of Stockholm (from June 1st to 3rd); then Örnsköldsvik from August 24th to 26th, and concluding at Gottskär (outside Gothenburg) from September 7th to 9th. The goal was to have a total of 45 races, which meant each club would sail 15 races on the water.

    KSSS (Royal Swedish YC) won the 2017 league.  However, their nemesis for the past four years has been Cape Crow YC. "Our ambition is, of course, to be on top this year again. But, we have new crews at every event this year and we are bringing in new, young talented girls onto the team. Of the 16 sailors we have been in this year, more than half have never sailed in the J/70 sailing league events,” said Niklas Edler, captain of the KSSS team.

    As was anticipated, the two protagonists were at it “hammer & tong” yet again for the 2018 season.  The first round of Allsvenskan was settled in Malmö between the two who dominated the Swedish league in recent years- KSSS (2015 & 2017) and Cape Crow YC (2016). This time, it was Cape Crow YC from Gothenburg that won with the team of Patrik Sturesson, Erik Malmberg, Herman Andersson and Elin Sturesson.

    "We have sailed really well and we are, of course, happy with the victory. We are especially pleased with Friday and Saturday sailing. On Sunday, it was a bit difficult, with a lot of shifts and reversals. So, we were sailing a little bit silly, you might say,” commented Patrik Sturesson, skipper of the CCYC team.

    Malmö offered glorious summer weather. Before the last race, Cape Crow's crew sat in the sunshine on land to see how the final round would be settled. If the KSSS were to be 1st or 2nd in that race, the victory would have gone to them.

    “It was incredibly exciting. We thought that KSSS would handle their last race, no problem.  But then, we saw that they started badly, and then we realized we could win,” said Sturesson from CCYC!

    In total, there were 15 races for each of the eighteen clubs. Cape Crow won five and was on the podium in a total of 13 out of 15 races, indicating an amazing consistency.

    KSSS finished second, while Särö Boat Club came third. And, despite the miss in the last race that cost the KSSS victory, the skipper Niklas Edler was pleased, "It has been a brilliant regatta in amazing conditions, with incredibly smooth and tight races. We sailed basically, very consistent, but with a few bad bumps in our record. We had a short lead before the final race and the total victory had been ours, if we were at worst second in the last race. Such is yacht racing!”  Follow the Swedish J/70 sailing league on Facebook here  For more Swedish J/70 sailing league information
     

    ROCKNROLLA Team Wins J/70 Russia league Act III
    (Moscow/ Konakovo, Russia)- The third act of the Russian J/70 Sailing League took place at the gorgeous, modern facilities of the Konakovo River Club on the northwest side of Moscow for the twenty-seven teams that are participating in the 2018 season series.  After a very competitive series with one of Russia’s top J/70 teams (Valerya Kovalenko’s ARTTUBE RUS1 sailing team) it was Andrei Kirilyuk’s talented crew on ROCKNROLLA Team that won the honors at Konakovo with his supremely talented crew of Dustin Baldeiva, Alina Dotsenko and Alexei Bushuev.

    Day One
    On the first day of the competition, the Race Committee managed to run only nine races, which meant that each team had only three races to sail on the day. As has been the case for the two events that were held in Sochi on the Black Sea earlier in Acts I & II, there were some pleasant surprises in the standings.  In the top six after the first day, the leading crews were ROCKNROLLA Sailing Team, DC TEAM, Black Sea Team, Konakovo River Club, Region-23 and Sail Lord-Europe.

    Day Two
    On the second day, the Race Committee crew managed to run fifteen more races for the 27 teams. At the end of the day, there were 24 races in total for eight teams. The first day leader- ROCKNROLLA Sailing Team continued sail well and confidently. Their skipper- Andrei Kirilyuk- now had 20 points (four 1sts, two 2nds, one 3rd, and 9th place).

    Day Three
    On the final day, the Race Committee managed to run twelve more races, for a regatta total of 36 races! An amazing achievement considering the tough (e.g. light) weather conditions they had to contend with.  However, only 19 teams had 12 races for the regatta. Therefore, eight teams were not lucky, and had to have an average added to their team scores.

    As a result, the “rock stars” on the ROCKNROLLA Sailing Team won- skipper Andrey Kirilyuk, Dustin Baldeiva, Alina Dotsenko and Alexei Bushuev carried the lead from start to finish. Literally - from start to finish! The team won the first race of the regatta and won its final race- a total of six 1sts! Bravo!

    In the fight for the podium, there was no question who would get the silver (as they were just two good races shy of winning!).  Valeria Kovalenko’s ARTTUBE RUS1 team of Alexandra Bozhko, Igor Lisovenko and Denis Rozhkov sailed “lights-out” on the last day. On the decisive day, they showed calmness and composure, collecting a 1-2-1-4 to nearly pull-off an overall win. Their silver only confirmed the championship level of the team and, of course, strengthened their leadership in the overall standings of the 2018 season. In the first three regattas, ARTTUBE RUS1 has finished second each time, amazing consistency, and hard to beat!

    Finishing third in the Konakovo event was the NAVIGATOR Sailing Team, skippered by Igor Rytov with crew of Anton Sergeev, Konstantin Besputin and Vyacheslav Martynov. It should be noted that the team spent the starting day of the regatta as they were in a coma; an 8-8-3-6 was nothing to write home about, as they say!  However, after that they “woke up” and accumulated five 1sts, a 2nd, and 3rd enroute to a meteoric, phoenix-like rise up the standings from 21st place to third overall in the final tally!  “Holy moon-shot,” said Robin to Batman, “where did those guys come from?!”

    Rounding out the top five only one point behind on a tie-breaker at 42 pts each were LEVIATHAN TEAM, skippered by Maxim Titarenko with crew of Vadim Yahinson, Michael and Maxim Sheremetyev and PIROGOVO Team skippered by Yezhkov, the countback going to LEVIATHAN.  Just 0.5 points back was REGION 23 Team skippered by Eugene Nikiforov.  Some great highlight videos from the Russian J/70 Sailing League marketing team on Facebook  YouTube sailing videos-  https://youtu.be/YkugyT-QFnE  and  https://youtu.be/D7u1_FWYQhs   Follow the Russian J/70 Sailing League here on Facebook.  For more Russian J/70 Sailing League information
     

    J/80’s Loving Chile’s Frutillar Cup!
    (Frutillar, Chile)- The longest running “offshore” race for keelboats on the absolutely spectacular Lago Llanquihue is the Frutillar Cup.  The regatta is sailed with handicaps and a combination of around the buoy races and random leg races up and down the gorgeous lakefront.

    Frutillar is a city in southern Chile's Lake District, with views of Osorno Volcano. It sits on the western edge of vast Llanquihue Lake, and has black sand beaches. German-style wooden buildings characterize the town, reflecting its colonial past. The German Colonial Museum explores this history and has a 19th-century mill. Ringed by five towering volcanic mountains that range from 10,000 to 14,000 ft, the lake waters are deep (up to 5,000 ft), and is 21 miles long and at least 20 miles at its widest points.

    The Frutillar YC hosted the regatta that included both J/80s and J/24s. After six races over three days, taking 2nd was Ezequias Allende’s J/24 PELICANO with a tally of 4-4-2-2-1-1 for 10 pts net.  Third was Gabriel Jordan’s J/80 BUCEFALO with a 3-3-4-4-2-2 for 14 pts net.  Fourth was yet another J/80, Alejandro Caroca’s DOMINGO 7 with a 2-2-5-5-4-4 record for 17 pts net.  And rounding out the top five was Cesar Contreras’ J/24 DRAKE with a 6-6-3-3-3-3 for 18 pts net.
     

    The Host Crushes J/80 Cumberland Cup
    (London, England)- Yacht clubs from around the world were invited to the Royal Thames YC’s biennial inter-club team racing challenge; the only international yachting event held in the Capital. Teams of eight sailors sailed matched J/80 keelboats in exciting 2 Boat Team Racing for the chance of winning the Cumberland Cup. Racing took place at the Queen Mary Sailing Club from Wednesday 9th May to Saturday 12th May.

    This year’s regatta was comprised of seven teams and their guests from across the globe- RTYC, Eastern YC (Marblehead, MA), Gamla Stans Yacht Sallskap, New York YC (Newport, RI), Royal Perth YC (Perth, Australia), Southern YC (New Orleans, LA), and Yale Corinthian YC (Branford, CT).

    Perhaps the biggest draw for the event is the famous, and very extensive, social program; a Reception at the RTYC London Clubhouse, drinks and tours of the Houses of Parliament and the Gala Dinner and Prize Giving in the Coffee Room overlooking Hyde Park!  Such an experience made for many memorable moments for the teams as they explored the city and one of the oldest seats of government in the world.

    As for the racing, the sailors experienced a good variety of winds, from less than zero to over 15 kts, making for challenging racing in the cramped quarters of the reservoir.

    Not surprisingly, when one looks at the outcome after eighteen races sailed for each team, it appeared it was the host inviting the lambs to the slaughter by the wily coyotes of the RTYC Team Racing crew!  RTYC won sixteen of those eighteen races to win by a comfortable margin.  Behind them, it was a tie on points between NYYC and YCYC, with the tie going to who-beat-who most; giving the silver to New York and the bronze to Yale Corinthian YC.   Royal Thames YC Cumberland Cup Facebook page here   Summary of the results here   For more Royal Thames YC Cumberland Cup sailing information
     

    Nicole Breault Wins US Match Race Qualifier
    (San Francisco, CA)- It was a weekend of high winds and high wins for St. Francis Yacht Club’s Nicole Breault, who won six out of seven matches at the US Match Racing Championship Qualifier at the St. Francis Yacht Club on May 19-20, 2018. Breault and her crew of Dana Riley, Karen Loutzenheiser, and Molly Carapiet will advance to the US Match Racing Championship in Chicago this October.

    San Francisco Bay breezed on strong, producing delays as well as some of the season’s most exciting racing to date. The eight competitors, which included four skippers from StFYC, two from San Diego, one from Alameda CA and one from Boston
    MA ventured out in J/22s on Saturday morning with wind speeds already in the high teens and building, accompanied by a steep two to three-foot chop driven by a strong ebb. Match racing, involving tight, rapid maneuvers, has lower limits on wind and wave conditions than fleet racing, and Race Director Jenn Lancaster and Chief Umpire Doug Sloan elected to delay the start. Flood tide diminished the wave height, however wind speeds continued to climb into the high 20s and touched 30 knots. At 3:00pm racing was called off and the sailors had to make do with dinner and libations in the Chart Room.

    Sunday’s forecast called for more of the same, so Lancaster set an 8:30am start, at which time winds were already in the mid-teens. The race committee adjusted the start/finish line and weather mark to accommodate the tide, while deciding for each flight whether to permit spinnakers. The sailors did their part by handling the challenging conditions with just a few knockdowns and collisions. The result was a full round-robin with each team racing every other team to determine the overall winner.

    The Qualifier was one of seven being held in the run-up to the Championship at Chicago Yacht Club in October 19-21. Though an Open competition, Breault had an all-women crew of Molly Carapiet, Dana Riley and Karen Loutzenheiser, and was the only female skipper in the event. Breault is a highly experienced match racer, as repeat winner of the US Women’s Championship title from 2016, and also having won the Women’s division of the Nations’ Cup in 2015.  In January, she was also named the St. Francis Yachtsman of the Year for 2017, the first time in the Club’s 91-year history that this has been awarded to a female sailor.

    When asked her thoughts about the event, Nicole commented, “This qualifier was definitely a test of boat control. Kudos to all of the teams- they played the match racing game quite well and worked hard to tame the J/22s in high winds and ebb-induced chop. My team, Molly, Karen and Dana, were rock solid and very much the reason we came out on top.”

    Race Coordinator Graham Biehl also had his work cut out to sort out the rest of the teams, as three were tied for second and another three for fifth, an indication of just how well-matched these racers were. In the end, the results were as follows, 1st Nicole Breault, 2nd Jeff Petersen and 3rd Domenic Bove. Sailing photo credits- Chris Ray  For more St Francis YC J/22 sailing information
     

    Epic Elite Keel Regatta
    (San Francisco, CA)- Sailing in similar windy, gusty weather as the J/22s along the San Francisco waterfront, the San Francisco YC hosted their annual Elite Keel Regatta along the northern side of the Bay near Sausalito for J/70s and J/105s.  The crews reveled in the epic, “blowing dogs off chains” weather, making for mind-blowing, fast rides with spray flying everywhere on the downwind legs- full-on planing mode it was, especially for the J/70s!

    Loving the breeze-on conditions was Chris Kostanecki’s San Francisco YC crew on the J/70 JENNIFER, winning the regatta with three bullets in five races!  Second was the trio of Scott Sellers, Geoff McDonald, and Harrison TU on St Francis YC-based 1FA with a 2-2-2-1-4 tally for 11 pts.  Third was Bob Milligan’s RAMPAGE team from Richmond YC.  Rounding out the top five were David Schuman’s San Francisco YC crew on BOTTLE ROCKET and Pete Woodhouse’s ZED team, 4th and 5th, respectively.

    In the eighteen-boat J/105 class, it was the first big regatta win for Tim Russell’s NE*NE, posting a 1-4-1-1-4 tally for 11 pts.  Taking the silver was Doug Bailey’s AKULA with a 4-3-3-4-1 score for 15 pts.  Third was Adam Spiegel’s JAM SESSION with a very roller-coaster scoreline of 2-1-12-6-3 for 24 pts.  The balance of the top five included Eric Stang’s JUJU in 4th and Pat Benedict’s ADVANTAGE 3 in 5th.
    For more SFYC Elite Keel Regatta sailing information
     

    J/Crews Sweep Santa Barbara Hardway Race
    (Santa Barbara, CA)- The Nineteenth Annual Island Series just completed the first of the three race series- The Hardway Race on May 19th.  Santa Barbara YC in Santa Barbara, CA and Pierpont Bay YC in Ventura, CA hosted the event.  This year the fleet did not go around Santa Cruz Island and instead the fleet was sent down the “Coastwise Spinnaker Course”- from the start line off Santa Barbara, leave Anacapa Island to port, leave the R2 Ventura entrance buoy to starboard, and finish in the Ventura Harbor entrance channel- a 47 nm course length.

    In the two Coastwise PHRF spinnaker divisions, J/Crews simply crushed the fleet, finding the fast-reaching conditions offshore in the big Pacific Ocean swells rolling down the Santa Barbara Channel much to their liking.

    In the seven-boat PHRF A class, the J/teams swept the podium.  Winning was Bernie Girod’s J/111 ROCK & ROLL, followed by Kenny Kieding’s J/111 ARGO 3, and Dr. Laura Schlessinger’s J/125 WARRIOR in third.

    PHRF B had an eight-boat class that was topped by Mike Leary’s J/30 PANGEA, winning by over 10 minutes on corrected time.  Third was Nick Nidzienko’s J/24 YOUNG FOOLS, fifth was Doug Steick’s J/100 JIB & TONIC, 6th Vincente Saborio’s J/24 PI, and 7th another J/100, George Brown’s SKOOKUM.  For more Hardway Race sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
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    * “Lessons Learned from a J/24 North American Champion”- Erica Beck Spencer has been sailing J/24s for a long time with her Portland, Maine based team on Sea Bags Women’s Sailing Team.  She offers her thoughts here on how she has continued to improve their performance over time.

    “Mike Ingham and his team just won the J/24 North American 2018 Championship. Mike is one of our mentors and we couldn’t be more proud of his team. In our 3.5 year tenure as an all-women’s team he has stood out as someone who always takes the time to lend advice and answer our many questions. For example, on day one of my first world championship as the skipper for a team at the 2017 Worlds in Toronto Canada, I questioned if I belonged at this event. I felt serious butterflies. He was the mentor I wanted to talk to. After I found him, he took time out of his pre-worlds’-morning routine to ask me just the right questions and to evaluate my nervousness. He convinced me that everyone is feeling some level of nerves and that the expert athlete needs to figure out how to compete at the highest level with those nervous feelings. Sometimes that means talking to teammates about how you’re feeling and to ask for what you need from them, sometimes that means just getting comfortable with that jittery feeling, breathing through it, and knowing what it is like to compete with them.

    At every event we’re both at, we find him and ask him questions. Inevitably paper and pens come out and we draw things and describe what we’d see on the water or boat in order to really learn—he doesn’t just answer our questions, he makes sure we understand the answers to our questions. My notebook has many “Mike Ingham Originals” as he often grabs it and draws sails, local conditions, or tactical situations. At the NA’s, Mike met with us for ten minutes as his team waited to leave for dinner, to talk about local knowledge. Currents coming through the race course from three different outlets heavily influenced local conditions—he reviewed all of this. After a thorough local knowledge talk, he challenged us with a question and didn’t give us the answer. In fact, he said, “Don’t answer now, walk away, think about it, and text me later.”

    The question was a starting line situation. He asked, if the line is square to the wind, and the wind is equal across the line, but the current is coming across the line from the boat end to the pin end, which end of the line is favored?  I’m not going to answer the question which we eventually got to, but I will say that we walked away thinking about it, talked to friends, and around 10pm we texted him our best answer. He responded with another question when we got it wrong.  (In Mike Ingham fashion, I ask you to put your answers to the question on the Facebook post in the comments and we’ll see what happens. Have fun!)

    My point in sharing all of this is to say that people like Mike are so good at this sport that they can teach you everything they know and still beat you the majority of the time on the race course. Perhaps karma played into his victory, I wouldn’t be surprised. He’s got a lot of it.  But to watch a mentor win the whole darn thing and to still have made time to share his expertise throughout the event—well that just is the true definition of sportsmanship.

    Congrats to you and your team Mike! Job well done! Thanks for being someone to emulate!”

    Stay tuned to this blog. As requested, this self-proclaimed (and competitor confirmed) regatta nerd and blogger will be digging into her notebook to share some of our biggest take aways from our fellow competitors as well as from the Quantum and North dock talks.

    Erica Beck Spencer is the skipper for the all-women's J/24 team sponsored by Sea Bags, a wonderful business recycling old sails into lovely bags and other products. She's a wanna-be rock star, learning everything she can about making these boats go as fast as possible. As a full-time working mother of two, she blogs when she can find time about all that she is learning to share with others.  Find and read her articles here  Or, follow the Sea Bags Women's Sailing Team Facebook page

    * The Chesapeake Bay J/70 GETMYBOAT.com was invited to Times Square as part of a “summer highlights” special with Fox News’s FOX & FRIENDS show in the early morning!  Here is the story by the owner of the J/70 GETMYBOAT.com- Don DeLoatch:

    “A welcome two-week break from racing sent my wife Molly and me to a quiet cabin in rural Virginia with our dogs. With spotty cell service, I did catch a call from our friends at GETMYBOAT.com asking if the Vortex crew could get our J/70 named GETMYBOAT.com to Fox Studios in New York city next week for a promotional spot on summer activities to include sailing on the popular Fox & Friends show airing on May 13th.

    I must admit my mind raced to the memory of Michael Douglas in the movie “Romancing the Stone”- a blockbuster movie (1984), pulling his sailboat down the streets of Manhattan to end the movie and get the girl. In my mind, I knew this had to happen so I put out feelers to the crew, Ryan Kozoriz our team manager was quick to volunteer for this wild and unforgettable experience. My wife had grown up outside of New York in a town called Mountain Lakes, and we had spent some time in the city over the years. As a southern boy, I was always impressed by the sheer volume of everything New York.

    As manager of the Vortex team, we know and use the GETMYBOAT app and thought this promotion would be helpful to many Bay sailors and powerboaters who may want to use the app as we have. I mentioned the quiet cabin I stayed at, this cabin was on the banks of a large lake, and I found a kayak rental on the GetMyBoat app, incredibly it was that easy. Several years back, our team planned to race the Rolex Big Boat in San Francisco on our J/105. This trip was at least a year in the making, and in our planning we found a J/105 charter available through the GETMYBOAT app that saved our team two-thirds the transportation cost and a considerable amount of time to pack and ready our boat, saving many man days of work.

    GETMYBOAT has helped our team get to many far off experiences, but driving through Times Square with our race boat was not expected. Somewhere on 49th street a cabbie pulled up revved his engine and asked, “where’s the start area?”

    Many eyes turned to gaze at the sparkling clean and sexy racer sliding down the busy streets of Manhattan. I was issued a parking permit in advance from the New York City Mayor’s office so I felt like a VIP. At Fox Studios, they treated us like VIPs. Fox Studios had a crew ready to help us move the boat onto the set. Also on the set, a fantastic Airstream camper and a vacation photographer who specializes in documenting your vacation for you-- no more selfies!

    All in all, it was a great experience for Ryan and me to share our love of sailing with a national audience in a way that may help some people get on the water more often. The Fox people knew a little about race boats, and I think they did an excellent job with the piece and several teasers featuring our J/70. I have also learned that GETMYBOAT was pleased and saw an increase in activity on the site.

    I think sailing is a great motivator to get off the couch, meet people, and maybe take your friends on a wild ride like we have been enjoying. Get out and sail; it will make a difference in you!”

    * Detroit sailors having some fun in Naptown!  According to J/34 IOR owner of KNEE DEEP, Brett Langolf, “a group of us sailors from Detroit represented Bayview Yacht Club at the Annapolis NOODs. We competed in the competitive 23-boat J/80 Fleet on the boat KOPP-OUT. The group of four had never sailed together, but knew each other from their hometown (Port Huron) and college (Michigan State). This was the owner/skipper’s (Tom Kopp) second regatta and, amazingly, our team took 2nd Place, one 1 point out of 1st after 8 races (3 days)!! We lost out to some local Pro’s that know the Bay waters well. They also led the fleet with three 1st place finishes throughout the weekend. Kudos to our crew- CJ Ruffing, Steve Young, and Tom Kopp!  We had a blast!”

    * METLIFE Veterans J/22 Regatta brings together Service Members at the SAIL NEWPORT Volvo Ocean Race stopover!

    The MetLife Veterans Regatta, a therapeutic event for veterans of active service duty, brought together 12 veterans from around the country for training and racing at the Volvo Ocean Race Newport Stopover on Monday and Tuesday- May 14 & 15. Racing in Sail Newport's fleet of J/22 sailboats, the veterans' crews also included a representative of race teams Vestas 11th Hour Racing, Team Brunel, Dongfeng Race Team, AkzoNobel and Turn the Tide on Plastic.

    Inaugurated during the 2014-’15 Volvo Ocean Race Newport stopover, it is the second time that MetLife and Sail Newport have partnered to host the regatta. Warrior Sailing, a program of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Sailing Foundation led by Ralf Steitz, Corey Kapes and Ben Poucher was also involved in recruiting and training sailors for the event.

    “MetLife is proud to work with Sail Newport to bring this exciting event to our veterans’ community,” said Kishore Ponnavolu, President, MetLife Auto & Home. “MetLife has a long legacy of supporting the veterans’ community through various programs and initiatives and we were happy to help make this racing experience truly memorable.”

    Nearly all veterans suffer some form of post-traumatic stress disorder that, in the worst cases, can lead to the veteran withdrawing from society. The Warrior Sailing program offers great opportunities for the veterans to experience life on the water despite their injuries.

    Team Brunel skipper Bouwe Bekking addressed the veterans before racing and stressed the importance of teamwork. Bekking said that his father fought for the Dutch during the Indonesian National Revolution in the late 1940s and also volunteered during the Korean Conflict. Bekking said that teamwork was as necessary for his father in conflict as it was for him as skipper of a round-the-world racing yacht.

    “That part of his life was so important to him, especially his mates and friends,” said Bekking, whose father passed away last fall. “Sailing is based on teamwork. Without the team you can’t perform.”

    “You have to stay in shape to a certain degree,” says Steitz, a co-founder of Warrior Sailing. “If you let your body go and you become a slave of your body, that’s a bad thing. The couch is not your friend.”

    The Warrior Sailing Program has graduated more than 250 veterans since its first Basic Sailing Program in 2013. Two of them, Dan Brown and Brian Stewart, took part in today’s regatta. The electricity in their eyes and the wide smiles on their faces after a day of challenging Mother Nature and their fellow veterans illustrates how well sailing works as an active sports therapy.

    Brown, 33, of Dallas, Texas, was a special ops medic with the 1st Marines Raider Battalion. Three years removed from active duty, he suffers brain trauma from repeated concussions. He had never sailed before joining Warrior Sailing, but now has a goal of completing a trans-oceanic passage.

    “I love the water. I love Warrior Sailing,” said Brown. “Due to my concussions I lose my train of thought easily if I’m reading. But, with sailing there are so many tactile functions, like grinding winches and pulling lines, that I’m able to focus. It’s great brain exercise!”

    Stewart, 36, of Boston, Mass., is a veteran of the Navy who’s been discharged since 2013. He found out about the Warrior program from Corey Kapes, a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist who joined Warrior Sailing after working with the VA. Stewart and Kapes were on a skiing trip when Kapes mentioned that he was transitioning to Warrior Sailing. Stewart had never been sailing before, but he immediately said, “I’ll try that.”

    Stewart has found sailing to be exhilarating and likes that he’s expanding his horizons. “I love the water. I like extreme weather. I love it when the boat heels over. I like learning and moving forward. It’s very aspirational.”

    Adapting to sailing is easy for the veterans because of the teamwork required for success. The old adage in sailing “you’re only as good as the guy behind you” holds true in combat. It’s that camaraderie that is especially appealing to the veterans.

    “This group learns faster than any other group,” says Hugh Freund, a 30-year-old coach of the Warrior Sailing Program. Freund was diagnosed with bone cancer and lost his leg while still a student. He competed in the 2016 Paralympic Games and won a silver medal as crew with Rick Doerr in the Sonar class.

    “The veterans are used to working in small teams,” says Freund. “They are used to problem solving and take accountability for their actions. We go out and practice for one day, come in, discuss what can be done better and the next day they go out and do it. It’s incredibly rewarding.”

    Freund and Brown were part of the winning crew along with veteran Nick Trado and Ruben Donne, a project coordinator for the Volvo Ocean Race. There were no losers on the day, however, and with events such as the MetLife Veterans Regatta, group therapy in a sporting contest goes a long way towards healing the men and women who sacrifice their lives for their country.

    * Brett Langolf, owner of the J/34 IOR KNEE DEEP has created another inspirational, entertaining sailing video for his family and friends that sail on their boat all summer.  Says Brett,

    “Happy Spring! For us sailors in the North and Midwest, we have a crazy long wait until we get above 50 degrees (you know, for all the chemicals to work)!  Then, we go like hell for 6 months and sail all over the place! The prep is intense and all hands on deck. It's May..... 'tis the season to start sailing!”
    Watch the May 18th edition of Brett’s “’tis the season” sailing video hereAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

    Read more...
  • J/Newsletter- May 16th, 2018 Successful Spring Tune-Up for J/121 Speedsters!
    (Newport, RI)- With most boatyards and boats still under shrink-wrap, and the Volvo Ocean Race just into town, J/121 owners gathered for the first J/121 Spring Tune-Up at the Newport Shipyard.  Eight owners from as far as England, Japan and Oregon sailed on four locally launched boats and enjoyed two days of coaching to kick off the 2018 sailing season. Friday afternoon’s session was led by Kimo Worthington and Chuck Allen of North Sails and included onboard coaches Alan Terhune, Reed Baldridge, Jack Orr, Kerry Klingler (Quantum Sails) and Wayne Zittel (J/World).

    As this was the first time two or more J/121's has had sailed alongside each other, the learning curve was steep.  Hulls #1 (INCOGNITO) and #2 (APOLLO) showed early speed thanks to previous time in the boat, but as the session went on hull #4 (ALCHEMY) and #6 (EAGLE) dialed right in.

    The on-the-water tuning session was followed up with refreshments and a debrief back at the dock, with each team sharing their 2-3 top take-aways.

    Watch this video of the simply “beautiful day” of sailing Friday afternoon in a classic, sunny, Narragansett Bay seabreeze from the southeast.

    Saturday’s forecast was for wet weather and variable winds – perfect for Open Course round the island style racing!    From the comforts of the MJM 50z  “ZING” (captained by Bob Johnstone), the race committee sent the fleet clockwise around Conanicut Island (a 20 mile track) with the course divided into 6 individual legs (to be scored separately as well as overall).

    In true distance race fashion, the starting line was set up square to the first mark (Beavertail Point) in an easterly wind, meaning the boats would start on a close reach on port tack. 

    David Southwell’s ALCHEMY nailed the start at the committee boat with the big A2 kite trimmed tightly in the 8 knot wind, with INCOGNITO close behind with main and jib.   APOLLO opted for the Code 0, and once things cleared, INCOGNITO unrolled the Code 0 and EAGLE hoisted the A2.   It became clear a few minutes into the race that the A2 could be carried, and with its bigger size (155m2 vs. 104m2), was a speed advantage that allowed both ALCHEMY and EAGLE to surge ahead and round Beavertail comfortably ahead.  The fleet jibed at Beavertail and proceeded north against the current on a tight starboard tack reach.   With lighter breeze in the bay, the leaders slowed, and thanks to carrying a Code 0 closer to shore, APOLLO was able to pass the leaders and win the second leg, which was shortened at the Red Bell south of Dutch Island. 

    Thanks to the flexible nature of the event, and the ability of the race committee to “reset the fleet” after any given leg, the teams were instructed to take a lunch break and proceed under engine to the northern end of the island where a steadier southeasterly was filling in. 

    Taking advantage of the MJM Yachts 50z ZING’s ability to hover in place on a precise GPS coordinate, a starting line was set up in seconds using a government marker as the port end, and the fleet was sent off on a short windward sprint to the northeast corner of Conanicut, followed by a long port tack favored beat to the Newport Bridge (featuring lots of tacking along the shore to keep out of the building flood current), and finally to the finish line just off the Volvo Race village at Fort Adams.  INCOGNITO got the early jump to win the first windward leg (Leg 3), and then after 8 miles of short tacking the Conanicut shoreline, ALCHEMY came through to win the final two legs and the first ever J/121 fleet event.  Three of the four boats won an individual leg (measured by elapsed time).  EAGLE came within 10 seconds of winning a leg, and notably finished 2nd on three out of the five legs.

    After racing, the teams were greeted dockside at Newport Shipyard with trays of Dark & Stormy’s followed by a race debrief and awards. 

    Coming up next, four J/121’s will be sailing in the 2018 Newport to Bermuda Race starting June 15th and a total of five boats will be actively sailing in the New England area this summer.

    All four boats had mobile phones equipped with the RaceQs.com tracking app that were used for both days to analyze the differences in performance.  And, on Saturday’s “open course” races, it also reflected how the teams chose sails and tactics as the fleet went around Jamestown Island.  Here are the 3D RaceQs.com replay links below.

    The “open course” race was defined for the following legs, which you can see on the RaceQs.com 3D replay:
    • Leg 1- Dumplings to Beavertail Bell
    • Leg 2- Beavertail Bell to Dutch Harbor Bell
    • Leg 3- Red Nun to Red Bell- top of Jamestown
    • Leg 4- Red Bell (NE Jamestown) to Newport Bridge
    • Leg 5- Newport Bridge to Red Nun (Fort Adams)
    For more J/121 offshore speedster sailing information
     

    J/CUP Regatta Preview
    (Cowes, IOW, England)- The Island Sailing Club will be hosting the annual J/CUP U.K. this coming weekend for an amazing fleet of fifty-eight boats from eight countries (United Kingdom, Switzerland, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany, Wales, France, Ireland).  There will be One-design racing for J/70s, J/88s, J/92s, J/97s, J/109s, J/111s, and an IRC handicap class.

    Sailing will take place on the infamous Solent, where tidal current tactics matter at least as much as playing windshifts and wind streaks on what many consider to be one of the trickiest bodies of water to sail on in the world.  In short, it’s a river that shifts tidally up to 4.5 kts with powerful wind-bending attributes off the highlands surrounding the Solent.

    As the largest class, the seventeen-boat J/70 fleet will have most of the top U.K. contenders present as they continue to marshal their resources with a view to a strong showing in the 2019 J/70 Worlds held in Weymouth, UK.  The leading contenders should be Terry O’Neill’s AQUA-J, Patrick Liardet’s COSMIC, Geoff Carveth & Doug Struth’s DSP, Paul Ward’s EAT SLEEP J REPEAT, Andrew Barraclough’s JENGA 8, Graham Clapp’s JEEPSTER, David McLeman’s OFFBEAT, and Marshall King’s SOAK RACING.

    With four teams, the J/88 class will have fierce competition amongst crews that have all won major events of one form or another over time.  The betting form on this group won’t make any sense, since they are all capable of winning.  The real question is, who’s got the complete team to make it happen for starts, tactics, and boathandling?  The contenders are David & Kirsty Apthorp’s familiar J-DREAM, Richard Cooper’s JONGLEUR, Dirk & Diane van Beek’s SABRIEL JR, and Gavin Howe’s TIGRIS.

    The six-boat J/92 class will be their largest gathering in years.  Watch for class veteran David Greenhalgh’s family on J’RONIMO to set the standard for this grouping.

    Similar to their J/88 class colleagues, there is no question that Ladbroke’s betting parlor would have a helluva hard time laying betting odds on each team in the five-boat J/97 class.  Each of the teams is formidable; it all depends on the crew/ tactics and staying out of trouble.  As such, those crews are Andy & Annie Howe’s BLACKJACK II, Mike Sellers & Chris Miles’ HIGH JINKS, Bob & Jon Baker’s JAYWALKER, Bob Hunt’s JUMBLESAIL 2, and the French crew from La Trinite sur Mer, Yann Gindre’s L’OPALE.

    With eight-boats, the J/109s are looking forward to their annual get-together at the J-CUP.  Look for these teams to factor on the leaderboard, Mike & Susie Yates’ JAGO, Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE, John Smart’s JUKEBOX, and Chris Burleigh’s JYBE TALKIN.

    As part of the J/111 Northern European Championship Series, the J/CUP was considered key, “not to miss” regatta, in the whole circuit.  With eleven boats in attendance, virtually all of the top crews of a very European contingent are participating from the U.K. (Paul Griffiths’ JAGERBOMB, Louise Makin/ Chris Jones’ JOURNEYMAKER II, Tony Mack’s McFLY, and Cornel Riklin’s JITTERBUG), Belgium (Sebastian de Liederkeke’s DJINN), Netherlands (Sjaak Haakman’s RED HERRING & Paul van Driel & Hans Zwijnenburg’s SWEENY), Germany (Norbert Burkert’s TOP JOB), and Switzerland (Michiel van de Meulen’s LALLEKONIG).

    In the IRC handicap division are Chaz Ivill’s J/112E DAVANTI TYRES, Mike & Sarah Wallis’ J/122 JAHMALI, Angus Bates’ J/133 ASSARAIN IV, and Mike Lewis’ J/80 JESTER.  For more J/CUP Regatta sailing information
     

    RORC Vice Admirals Cup Preview
    (Cowes, IOW, England)- This Solent-based inshore regatta is primarily for one-design classes or similar style of boats to enjoy three days of intense racing.  After each day's racing, competitors can enjoy the welcoming atmosphere and socials in the RORC Cowes Clubhouse.

    The regatta takes place from Friday, May 18th to Sunday, May 20th.  A mixture of windward/ leeward and “random leg” round-the-cans races are planned for the fleet with up to four races per day!

    There are over a dozen J/crews sailing the event, with a J/109 class of seven boats, a J/111 class of seven boats, and the sole J/team in IRC 1 class is Chris Daniel’s J/122E JUNO.

    The J/111s include the 2016 J/111 World Champion, Martin Dent’s JELVIS, along with a cadre of top U.K. crews like Chris Jones/ Louise Makin’s JOURNEYMAKER II, Paul Griffiths’ JAGERBOMB, Tony Mack’s McFLY, Cornel Riklin’s JITTERBUG, and the top Dutch Team- Hans Zwijnenburg’s SWEENY.

    The top J/109 crews include Simon Perry’s JIRAFFE, Dave Richards’ JUMPING JELLYFISH, John Smart’s JUKEBOX, and Roger Phillips’ DESIGNSTAR 2.  For more RORC Vice Admiral’s Cup sailing information
     

    J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    The action was flying thick and fast at a number of regattas in Europe.  For starters, fifty J/70s were doing battle in the second act of the Italian J/70 Cup in Porto Ercole, Italy.  There was more J/70 action up in Scandinavia. Hosted by Halmstad Segelsallskap in Halmstad, Sweden, it was the Swedish J/70 International Regatta that hosted thirty boats from Finland, Sweden, and Norway. Then, down in central Europe, the North Sea Regatta completed the first two legs of that event with the offshore races- the Vuurschepen Race and RORC North Sea Race.  Next on the agenda for them are the one-design and inshore races.  Finally, on the Bay of Biscay, the Grand Prix Ecole de Navale was held off Brest/ Laveoc, France in Brittany for the J/80s Championnat de France and also the J/22 European Championship.

    Over in the Americas, the Corinthian YC of Portland held its annual offshore classic that acts as a feeder race to the Swiftsure International Race, the 183nm Oregon Offshore Race from the mouth of the Columbia River in Oregon to Victoria, BC in Canada.  Then, south of the border in Mexico, the J/70 NA’s are taking place on the pretty mountain lake of Valle de Bravo, hosted by Club Vela de la Pena.

    Read on! The J/Community and Cruising section below has many entertaining stories and news about J/Sailors as well as cruising blogs about those who continue to enjoy the Caribbean and the South Pacific, staying warm while others are trying to stay warm up north.  Check them out!  More importantly, if you have more J/Regatta News, please email it or  upload onto our J/Boats Facebook pag  Below are the summaries.

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    May 14-19- J/70 North American Championship- Valle de Bravo, Mexico
    May 18-20- North Sea Regatta- The Hague, The Netherlands
    May 24-28- J/Cup United Kingdom- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    May 25- Storm Trysail Block Island Race- Larchmont, NY
    May 25-28- The FIGAWI Race- Hyannisport, MA
    May 26- Spinnaker Cup Offshore Race- Belvedere, CA
    May 26-28- Swiftsure International Yacht Race- Victoria, BC, Canada
    May 26-28- U.K. J/24 National Championship- Poole, England
    May 28-29- Coastal Cup Race- Santa Barbara, CA
    May 31- SoCal 300 Race- San Diego, CA

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

    ENFANT TERRIBLE- ADRIA FERRIES Two-Peats!
    Win Italian J/70 Cup Act II- Porto Ercole
    (Porto Ercole, Italy)- A battle for the podium until the last gybe characterized the finale of the J/70 Cup in Porto Ercole, the second act of the Open Italian J/70 Circuit. The event consisted of three-days of racing, with eight races completed in wonderful sunny conditions and with moderate breeze up to 18 kts for the fleet of fifty-one crews racing from nine countries (Austria, Great Britain, Germany, Italy, Malta, Monaco, Poland, Russia, Switzerland).

    On the last day, going into the last race, a six points gap separated the fleet leader, Alberto Rossi’s ENFANT TERRIBLE- ADRIA FERRIES from Gianfranco Noe’s CALVI NETWORK, and Claudia Rossi’s PETITE TERRIBLE (a family affair, as she is Alberto’s daughter); a race where there was a potential for a drastic change in team placements on the final podium.

    The first boat to cross the finish line for the leading trio in the final run to the finish was CALVI NETWORK in 8th position, four boats ahead of ENFANT TERRIBLE. But, the gap was not enough to gain the overall lead, despite a disastrous 24th in race 7 for Alberto Rossi’s crew that included Branko Brcin, Andrea Felci, Stefano Rizzi and Bianca Crugnola. As a result, ENFANT TERRIBLE took the gold with 33 pts net, Noe’s CALVI NETWORK just two points back to take second with 35 pts net.  Then, with an easy shot at the lead, Claudia Rossi’s PETITE TERRIBLE crew could not crack the top ten in the last race, posting a 15th to remain in third overall with 41 pts net.

    Enjoy a cool sailing video of PETITE TERRIBLE sailing team (Claudia Rossi, Michele Paoletti, Simone Spangaro, Gaia Ciacchi, & Matteo Mason) here.

    Rounding out the top five in the open division was Franco Solerio’s L’ELAGAIN in 4th and Luca Domenici’s NOTARO TEAM LEGGI D’ITALIA in 5th.

    In the Corinthian division, the winners were Alessio Marinelli’s UJI UJI, who managed to overtake Paolo Tomsic’s LA FEMME TERRIBLE, leader of their division for the first two days of racing. Second place went to Alessandro Zampori’s NOBERASCO DAS who maintained their position at the end of the races of Saturday.  Third place went to LA FEMME TERRIBLE after disastrous last day finishes of 13-39.

    In the last day of racing, the two races were won by Valerya Kovalenko’s Russian crew on ARTTUBE and Germany’s Markus Wieser on MISSION IMPOSSIBLE.

    Maurizio Belloni, Vice-President of CNV Argentario, commented, "We are honored that J/70 Italian Class chose Porto Ercole as the location of its regatta and we were blessed with great weather conditions and the excellent work of the Race Committee.”

    Leaving Porto Ercole, some of the fleet will head to Vigo, Spain, where from June 12th to 16th many crews will take part in the J/70 European Championship, sailing on the open waters of the wild Atlantic Ocean. Among these, Claudia Rossi on board PETITE TERRIBLE will be there to defend her title earned in the last two years.  However, this year may be her most challenging event yet.  Also competing will be ENFANT TERRIBLE, JENIALE EUROSYSTEM, LA FEMME TERRIBLE, NOBERASCO DAS and many other top European teams.

    The next event organized by Italian J/70 Class will be the third act of the Italian J/70 Cup in Malcesine, hosted by Fraglia Vela Malcesine on the fabulous Lago di Garda from July 12th to 15th.  For more Italian J/70 Cup sailing information
     

    Mattson Takes Swedish J/70 Nationals By A Whisker!
    (Halmstad, Sweden)- Twenty-nine boats from across Scandinavia (Sweden, Finland, Norway) participated in the J/70 International Swedish Championship, hosted by Halmstad Segelsallskap.  The racing was fast and furious and produced a lot of close racing, with every team in the top five having to discard huge double-digit finishes after seven races and not one team counted all top ten scores!

    Last year's Scandinavian Champion, Oscar Lundqvist, crewed for his brother and friends on HILDA.  Their team consisted of Jacob Lundqvist, Erik Skoting, Pelle Vickberg, and Oliver Österberg.  After missing an opportunity to win the regatta for the second straight year in a row by posting a disastrous last race 20th, Oscar commented on why they enjoy racing J/70s in Europe, "I do not think there is any class in the Nordic countries that can collect an even start-up field where all participants are well placed to win. We have also shown that the boat can sail at all ages, young and old. From our side we would have liked to see more young teams on the track. With a little will and hard work you can get a boat and get started with good conditions. When we were in Denmark recently, about half the field consisted of young crews, which was encouraging. Hopefully, this may happen here at home in Sweden as well, and in view of all the clubs that are now around the country, the conditions have never been better. Just jumping into a boat and driving is easy!”

    After the first day's four races, Mikael Lindqvist’s DYNAMANT RACING from KSSS was the leader with a 14-1-2-16!  Second was Martin Fridh’s ISBAR crew (Ylva Hofvander Trulsson, Jakob Reuterskold, Jan-Erik Jonsson) with an equally scary tally of 16-6-7-2!  Then, even more eye-opening was the third place scores for Daniel Mattson’s Finish crew from Ålandske Segelsällskapet (Mathias Dahlman, Johan Nystrom, Staffan Lindberg), with an eye-popping 2-14-15-1!

    Sunday’s three races produced even more extraordinary roller-coaster rides for everyone in the top ten.  The only boat to avoid a double-digit score was the ultimate regatta winner- Mattson’s FIN 673, posted a blistering record of 7-1-2 for a total score of 27 pts net.  The Swedish Lundqvist brothers on HILDA started the day with a 2-2 and were leading the regatta going into the final race. However, an unfortunate “digger” of a last race- a 20th- became their discard and they had to settle for the silver with 37 pts net.  Coming on strong in the last two races with a 4-3 was Henrik Lundberg’s Finish crew on ALMACO, finishing with 41 pts net.

    Rounding out the top five were Anders Kemmler’s Swedish crew on DYNAMANT RACING in 4th and Jan Nilsson’s hometown Swedish crew on NN in 5th.  The top Norwegian boat was Eivind Astrup’s NORWEGIAN STEAM in 15th place.

    A big “Thank You” to everyone in the HASS club that hosted and ran a great regatta! From the kitchen, to the secretary, and to the volunteers on the race track. Amazingly good work everyone!  Sailing photo credits- Daniel Stenholm  For more Swedish J/70 Nationals sailing information
     

    TU DELFT BROACH Wins J/22 Europeans
    Moriceau Crushes J/80 French Championship
    (Laveoc, France)- The Grand Prix Ecole de Navale in Brest/ Laveoc, France hosted their annual GPEN Championnat de France from May 10th to 12th on the choppy, windy waters of the Bay of Biscay- it’s one of Europe’s largest one-design events.  The event also marked the 2018 J/22 European Championship, where eleven teams from the Netherlands, Canada, France, and Germany managed to sail eleven races.  Concurrently, a forty-two boat J/80 class enjoyed the third event in their France J/80 Cup- a season-long series of eight regattas.

    Thursday- Gorgeous Spring Sailing
    The fleet was blessed beautiful, mild weather conditions on the first day sailing off the tip of Brittany.  The J/22s and J/80s both enjoyed three races in a weakening northwest breeze that started early in the day at 12-18 kts and slowly diminished to 8-13 kts by late afternoon.

    It was the Canadian team of Johann Koppernaes on RAISED J (Michele Cimon, Mike Marshall, Adrienne White) that took the lead in the J/22 Europeans after a 3-2-1 score for 6 pts. Perhaps the Dutch and French teams were surprised, but it certainly helped to have J/22 World Champion Mike Marshall from North Sails on board as trim/ tactician! Second on the day was Jesper Overbeeke’s Dutch crew on TU DELFT BROACH with a 1-3-4 for 8 pts.  Sitting in third was Patrick Huet’s French crew on EUROPEAN HOMES, one of the pre-regatta favorites that managed a consistent 2-5-2 for 9 pts.

    Over on the J/80 course, the forty-two boats were creating havoc, getting off the starting line was difficult and it was hard to recover if any of the top boats were deep early.  Nevertheless, avoiding those pitfalls and winning the first two races were Simon Moriceau’s ARMEN HABITAT, finishing with a scoreline of 1-1-4 and 6 pts for the day.  Second after posting a steadily improving tally of 12-2-1 for 15 pts was another top crew, Luc Nadal’s GAN’JA.  Rounding out the top three were Patrick Bot’s ECOLE NAVALE CG29 with a 4-8-5 score for 17 pts.

    Friday- Grey, Chilly, Windy!
    After enjoying a lovely day of sailing to start out the regatta, everyone knew the forecast was going to change dramatically for the second day, with grey skies, cold temperatures and 15-25 kt southwest winds producing big seas.

    Four boats stand out overall after 6 races in the J/80 class. Moriceau’s ARMEN HABITAT dominated the first day but still managed to post all top five races of 3-5-5 to end the day at the top of the leaderboard.  Luc Nadal’s GAN’JA also posted good scores of 2-9-2 to hang on to his second place from day one.  However, below them it was chaos.  Leaping up the standings was Sylvain Pellisier’s INTUITIVE SAILS with a white-hot tally of 1-3-1 to snatch the bronze position.

    Simon Moriceau from APCC Sports Sailing commented on their performance, "It was a harder day for us today. We lost some points to our opponents. We were more in trouble off the line today. We have a new crew, two of the crew members had some boathandling issues- but, fixed now! Tomorrow, it will be a battle, we will have to be focused and watch our opponents."

    Luc Nadal from NDCV Angers said, “We were very happy to sail fast and smarter today. We have sailed several times in the GPEN regatta and we dreamed of having a great day in Crozon-Morgat. And, finally, we did! We are now in second and happy with our place, despite two or three little issues slowing us down. Tomorrow will be a decisive day, if we do three races, the top five is still totally open."

    Patrick Bot from CV Ecole Navale offered his perspective, "This day went well for us. There was a lot of wind and waves, so it was fast and exciting! We are quite happy with ourselves, our speed and our sails. Yes, we dropped to fourth place with a 4-7-3, but tomorrow we will fight to be on the podium!”

    The J/22s also had four good races in the big seas and big breeze. No one was going to slow down the dominance of Overbeeke’s Dutch crew on TU DELFT BROACH.  Loving the big stuff, they smoked the competition with a 1-3-1-1 to easily take over the lead for the title of European Champion.  Dropping to second place were the Canadians on RAISED J with four 2nds!  And, moving into third was Auke Holtrop’s RSZ ROTTERDAM WORLDGATE with a 5-1-3-3.

    Saturday- Grey & Cool & Light
    After an exhausting wet and windy day on Friday, the sailors appreciated sailing more benign weather conditions. Though still grey and cool, the wind had moderated to 8-12 kts from the west.

    The battle for the title of J/22 European Champion was not decided until the end. With four more races scheduled and completed, it was anyone’s guess how the cards would drop on the table for the top three boats. In the third race of the day, the regatta leader TU DELFT BROACH got DSQ’d, adding 12 pts to their scoreline and potentially torpedoing their chances of winning.  Meanwhile, Holtrop’s RSZ ROTTERDAM WORLDGATE posted a sizzling 2-2-1 with a chance to win the crown!  Furthermore, the Canadians on RAISED J slipped a little with their 3-5-4 scores.

    As a result, the three boats were essentially tied, with the outcome riding on the final race.  It must have been a wake-up call for Overbeeke’s crew to get tossed in race 10, as they simply sailed fast and smart to win the last race and be crowned the 2018 J/22 European Champions by just 3 pts!  Doing their best to close the gap, but never quite succeeding was Holtrop’s crew, taking 2nd in the finale to grasp the silver.  Meanwhile, the Canadian’s on RAISED J slipped yet again, finishing with a 6th to hold on for the bronze.

    The rest of the top five had Patrick Huet’s EUROPEAN HOMES in 4th and Annefleur De Zeeuw’s DJINN HISTOS in 5th place (she was also top women’s skipper).

    In the J/80s, Moriceau’s ARMEN HABITAT started the day with their worst score of the regatta, a 12th.  Then, followed it up with a 7th and closed with a 2nd for the third and finale race of the day. While not their best outing, it was enough to be take the title of “J/80 Championnat de France Monotype Habitable.”  Bot’s ECOLE NAVALE CG29 stayed mostly out of trouble and finished the event with a 7-4-4 to take second.  Like Moriceau, Pellisier’s INTUITIVE SAILS crew started off with a horrendous 18th (their toss race) and then closed with a vengeance, smoking the fleet for two bullets to take third place.

    The balance of the top five was Nadal’s GAN’JA in 4th and Anne Phelipon’s NAVIGATLANTIQUE in 5th (she was also top women’s skipper).  Second women’s skipper was Maxime Rousseaux’s CN ST CAST GRAND OUEST ETIQUETTES (7th overall) and third was Claire Ferchaud’s ELITE APRIL MARINE- SN SABLAIS (8th overall). It was a fantastic showing for these three women skippers to crack the top ten and between them win two races and get seven podium finishes!

    No question, the competition is getting hotter in the Open and Women’s divisions as the J/80 teams are preparing for their J/80 World Championship that will be sailed at Les Sables d'Olonne, France, also on the Bay of Biscay in very similar wind/wave conditions.

    After winning, Simon Moriceau (Armen Habitat) commented, "It was very tight, as we were only two points ahead this morning. It was hot! The first race of the day, we gained control over the next three boats, despite our 12th place! It was not necessarily obvious what to do, because at that time, the wind was moving in all directions.  But, we always had an eye on our competitors and didn’t lose them. Without a bad race this morning, it would have been much easier. We had a new crew that responded very well, we had a good cohesion in the team.  I am really happy to win my third title of Championnat de France!  With a wind like today, it was very shifty, adding a little spice and challenge to the regatta! Thank You to GPEN for a great event!”  For more J/80 GPEN and J/22 Europeans sailing information
     

    J/Crews Leading North Sea Regatta
    (Scheveningen, The Netherlands)- Hosted by the Jachtclub Scheveningen, the North Sea Regatta is the largest event hosted in the Netherlands each year for a host of one-design classes (dinghies, cats, and keelboats like J/22s and J/80s) and offshore ORC/IRC classes.

    The event kicked off on May 8th with the Vuurschepen Race, a North Sea Regatta Feeder Race that goes from the starting line off The Hague (Scheveningen) and takes a 3 mark course of 130nm across the North Sea to Harwich in the United Kingdom.  Several J/teams were sailing and almost all had podium finishes!

    The “J/All-stars” were in the ORC Two-Handed division.  Winning was Robin Verhoef & John van der Starre’s J/122E AJETO.  Taking the silver was Chris Revelman & Pascal Bakker’s J/122 JUNIQUE/ RAYMARINE and 4th was Wim van Slooten & Jochem Hamstra’s J/109 FIRESTORM.

    In the ORC 2 division, taking 3rd was Alain Bornet’s J/109 JAI ALAI and 4th Arjen van Leeuwen’s J/109 JOULE.

    After a two-day layover, on the 11th of May, teams representing Belgium, Denmark, France, Great Britain and the Netherlands entered the 181nm North Sea Race; the start was off Harwich, England and finished in Scheveningen, The Netherlands. The race was organized by the Royal Ocean Racing Club, in association with the Royal Harwich Yacht Club, the East Anglian Offshore Racing Association, and the Yacht Club Scheveningen.

    “The race was mostly upwind and reaching, with very few teams getting their spinnakers out of the bag,” commented RORC Racing Manager, Chris Stone. “Conditions conspired to favor the smaller yachts, as the faster boats did not get the breeze that arrived later in the race. Over the course of the season, favorable conditions will average out through the fleet. Well done to the teams that did well, even when the conditions are right for your team, you still have to put in a top performance to win your class, and have a chance of the overall win.”

    In the IRC Two-Handed Class, Robin Verhoef & John Van Der Starre's Dutch J/122e AJETO was second, and Wim van Slooten's Dutch J/109 FIRESTORM was third.  Then, 4th were the amazing women duo of Edith Voskamp & Yvonne Beusker’s J/105 PANTHER, finishing 5th behind them were Chris Revelman & Pascal Bakker’s J/122 JUNIQUE.

    “We are very please with our result, as Two-handed racing in Holland has become very popular and very competitive.” commented AJETO’s Robin Verhoef. “Our J/122e was specially built for Two-handed sailing, and we love to sail that way because we don't need any more crew or all the additional equipment and provisions required when more people are on board. We do have systems designed for two-handed racing, and our preparation is always a big part of producing the best performance.”

    As a result, the three teams that are dominating the podium for the overall regatta in the ORC Two-handed Division are AJETO on top, followed by JUNIQUE and FIRESTORM.

    On the return trip to the Netherlands, the ORC 2 division J/crews had a rough time.  Settling for 5th was Alain Bornet’s JAI ALAI (currently sitting 2nd in class for the overall regatta) and ending up in 9th was Arjen van Leeuwen’s J/109 JOULE.   Follow the North Sea Regatta on Facebook here   For more North Sea Regatta sailing information   RORC North Sea Race information
     

    J/46, J/105, J/30 Top Oregon Offshore Race
    (Portland, OR)- The 42nd annual Oregon Offshore International Yacht Race was held this past weekend. The race started on May 10, 2018. The starting line was off the mouth of the Columbia River.  The boats then proceeded north to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and finished at Victoria, British Columbia, inside the harbor entrance. The course distance is 193 miles; twenty-two boats entered the race (six of them J/teams) while fourteen boats finished.

    From the start and going up the coast, it appeared the boats that worked offshore had better winds.  However, once turning the tip of the Olympic Peninsula to head back southeast down the Straits of Juan de Fuca, the big battle became the flood turning to ebb and which side to pick?  Canadian (north shore) or Washington (south shore- USA)?  Virtually all boats chose the northern shore to escape current and for more breeze.

    In PHRF A1 Division, it was Scott Campbell’s beautiful flag blue J/46 RIVA that took second in her class, followed by Tom Keffer’s J/42 VELOCITY in fourth position.  Then, in PHRF A2 Division, it was Doug Pihlaja’s J/105 ABSTRACT that won class honors.  Finally, in PHRF C Division, Theo Singelis’s J/30 TAKU took class honors, too!

    Next up for these intrepid adventurers is the annual Pacific Northwest offshore classic- the Swiftsure International Race in a few weeks time.  For Oregon Offshore Race sailing & tracking information
     

    J/70 N.A. Championship Update
    (Valle de Bravo, Mexico)- It has been a busy week in Mexico’s Valle de Bravo.  This past weekend, Club Vela la Pena hosted the J/70 Mexican National Championship, and after a brief respite, the J/70 North American Championship began Wednesday morning this week.  Here is Aly Di Nas’ report as bow girl on XPRESS (thanks to Sailing Anarchy.com).

    “I am thrilled to be sailing for my first time ever in Mexico! The 32 teams competing represent both coasts of the USA, Argentina, and many of Mexico’s main racing towns – Acapulco, Puerto Vallarta, Cancun and locals from Valle.

    This mountain lake venue is a challenge for anyone, but especially those of us visiting for the first time. The prevailing breeze is a thermal that fills over the mountains like clockwork at noon daily, only to be fought back by a cool southern breeze and thunderstorms from the west a few hours later.

    Conditions are shifty and puffy, but as the lone Gringa on a team of locals aboard Luis Barrios’ XPRESS, I seem to be assimilating quickly.  After two days of racing in the Mexican Nationals, our team slid into First Corinthian by just two points! (We can add a few style points for the already-outdated Anarchy III flat brim, which made the pilgrimage with me south of the border). The overall national champion was Javier Navarro’s BANDOOLA Racing.

    Numerous tequila shots later, we are back into it as of Wednesday morning, with four races completed on the first day of NA’s. The results of day 1 have three American teams in podium position, with the Argentines close on their heels. Racing continues through Saturday.  For more J/70 North American Championship sailing information and results
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
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    * What is the common denominator of the top three Volvo Ocean Race boats finishing in Newport on Leg 8 and also the top three teams in the VOR overall??  All have championship J/Sailors on their teams- in key roles.

    MAPFRE- Xabi (skipper) and his brother Iker Fernandez sailed J/80s for years in Spain and sharpened their offshore keelboat skills in perhaps the world’s toughest one-design fleet in Spain- producers of SEVEN J/80 World Champions. Another Spanish sailor with extensive J/80 experience in Barcelona is Juan Vilar, their famous navigator (a multi-America’s Cup winner).  Where “giving an inch, means taking a mile” is the sword you live and die by in one-design events, it’s no surprise they dug deep to go from 5th to 1st on the Itajai, Brazil to Newport, RI leg and lead the standings overall.

    BRUNEL- Bouwe Bekking (skipper) and Andrew Cape (navigator) are no strangers to racing at the top of the game, both one-design and offshore.  Bouwe cut his teeth early in life racing J/24s as well as J/109s later with friends offshore in the Netherlands.  “Capey” sailed numerous J/Boats over times, including sailing with Stu Johnstone on his J/44 J-HAWK in the Island Double Race hosted by the Royal Southampton YC- which they won together and awarded the coveted blue & white towel! In addition, they have Rome Kirby aboard; he and his father Jerry Kirby have sailed on many J’s over time in both local J/24 racing and PHRF handicap racing offshore. If that wasn’t enough one-design experience and toughness, one of America’s top women’s match racers, sailing coach and has raced extensively on J/22s and J/80s is none other than Wisconsin’s Sally Barkow.

    VESTAS- Charlie Enright (skipper) and Mark Towill (captain) have grown up around J’s their entire lives.  Charlie was a J/24 World Champion and both have sailed with the Commodore of Bristol YC and others on J/24s, J/109s and the new J/121 offshore speedster all over Narragansett Bay- no wonder they made huge gains in the last five miles of the race from Itajai to Newport- cannot get much better “local knowledge” than those two!

    DONG FENG- Charles Caudrelier (skipper) grew up in France and has extensive experience sailing the incredibly hot and competitive J/80 class in France.  Like Xabi on MAPRE, the J/80 one-design experience in Europe taught them the value of extracting every ounce of performance from their boats, never settling for second best.  In fact, when “testing” Chinese candidates for crew in China, Charles used J/80s to determine the best sailors and used them to practice hard to “sensitize” the sailors to small changes in tune/trim for superior performance.

    Needless to say, it is not surprising that top three crews in the Volvo Ocean Race have extensive J/Boats experience on their resumes.  If you want to learn how to get to the top of the sailboat racing game, hop into any one of the world’s most popular one-design offshore keelboat classes- J/22, J/24, J/70, J/80, J/88, J/105, J/109, J/111 (and soon- the new J/121 offshore speedster!).

    Read the fascinating analysis of how these champions tackled the final part of the Itajai-Newport leg here.

    * The J/121 JACKHAMMER was sail-testing and training off Newport, RI the past two weeks; newly launched off Bristol, RI by her owner Andrew Hall from the United Kingdom.

    “We have been working hard on this project for many months this winter,” explains Barry Hayes of UK Sailmakers Ireland. “We are very excited to see JACKHAMMER in the water and out sailing. JACKHAMMER’s owner (Andrew Hall) has put a lot of work into this project and we are delighted to be involved. Our goal was to provide a turnkey sail package for Andrew. He was able to step aboard, throw off the lines, and go fast straight away– goal achieved.”

    JACKHAMMER was built in the US, the sails were designed in Ireland, built in our production facility in Hong Kong, and then fitted and tested in Newport– such is the global reach and expertise of the UK Sailmakers Group.

    JACKHAMMER is powered by Uni-Titanium upwind and an extensive downwind wardrobe consisting of Matrix spinnakers and Top Down furling Code Zero and Flying Jib.

    The J/121 is designed with ease of use in mind – as such, all fore sails are set on furlers. The J1 and J2 jibs work on a Selden Furling unit with the J3 Staysail working on an Ubi-Maior furling unit. The J3 is hoisted to a halyard lock and tensioned using a 3:1 purchase tack line– this enables it to be cleared off the bow when not in use but deployed with ease and speed when needed.

    In addition to her A2 and A3 downwind Matrix Asymmetric spinnakers, JACKHAMMER is also equipped with a top down furling Code Zero, direct furling Flying Jib and heavy weather direct furling A5 Asymmetric spinnaker.

    This setup is versatile and enables the power output of the sailplan to be managed very effectively, especially offshore. In our sailing video you will see the Flying Jib set on a small bowsprit and used in conjunction with the J3 Staysail. Also shown is her Top Down Furling Code Zero and her J2 and full mainsail configuration.  J/121 UK Sails Ireland sailing video.

    * VIRTUAL Regatta has announced the “eSailing World Championship” in conjunction with the World Sailing association and it features the J/70 one-design as the primary “virtual” racing sailboat for the finale.

    World Sailing is launching into the digital world as it announced that the Official eSailing World Championship starts May 10th; the game is now available online for millions worldwide to play and enjoy for free. Learn more here.

    The launch of the eSailing World Championship takes sailing into a brave new world, where the core skills of sailing remain, but the constraints of venue and equipment are removed. Sailing demands constant inputs and an acquired skillset to manage the relationship between the boat and the forces of nature.

    These unique qualities are all captured accurately in this virtual world and will provide sailors onshore, and fans without access to sailing equipment, to become engaged and inspired by the excitement of sailing.

    In partnership with Virtual Regatta, the leading digital sailing platform, the eSailing World Championship will be comprised of a series of weekly Challenges and Play-Offs, with the boat types and venues changing on a regular basis. The series will culminate in a Live Arena Final to be held in Sarasota, Florida on the 30th of October- the boat of choice will be the J/70!

    Governed by the Virtual Racing Rules of Sailing, the 2018 eSailing World Championship open access game will start on May 10 and run through to the start of September. Each Challenge will be graded based on the importance of the Challenge with Players earning Ranking points. The top five Players from each weekly Challenge will automatically qualify to the Play-Offs.

    The Play-Offs will bring together the pre-qualifiers and the top ranked Players from the eSailing World Championship World Rankings, until a quota of 1,000 is reached. The Play-Offs will be an online virtual regatta and will last up to 14 days in September.

    The top four ranked women and top four men from the Play-Offs will qualify for the eSailing World Championship Final. They will be invited on a full expenses paid trip to compete against the best eSailors in the world. It will be held in front of a live crowd on October 30th 2018 at the Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall in Sarasota, Florida, USA, and streamed worldwide on a range of Internet channels from Twitch to Facebook Live.

    Each Challenge will be held in boats that are internationally recognized with the intricate details that make them challenging to sail on the water, seamlessly incorporated into the game. Players will be able to race on a variety of boats.  However, the eSailing World Championship will be raced using the J/70 and its well-known polars- the world’s most popular one-design sportboat.

    Alongside the announcement of the launch, World Sailing welcomes North Sails, a worldwide leader in sailmaking, as an Official Technical Partner for the eSailing World Championship.

    Speaking at the launch event, World Sailing President Kim Andersen stated, “Sailing as a sport is constantly pushing the boundaries of human innovation and engineering and today, World Sailing is entering a brave new world that is going to revolutionize our sport.

    As the world governing body, World Sailing has a duty to develop and promote the popularity of the sport. We are moving the sport into an exciting new future that will inspire millions more to fall in love with a sport that so many of us here hold dear to them.

    Aimed at everyone from expert sailors to sports gamers, the eSailing World Championship will enable sailors on shore and fans without access to sailing equipment or facilities to become engaged and inspired by the excitement of sailing.”

    Philippe Guigne, Founder and CEO of Virtual Regatta said, “It’s a very big day for Virtual Regatta. We are launching the most ambitious project we have ever undertaken and we are proud to be partnering with World Sailing who have become one of the first international sports federations to enter this industry.”

    The game can be played on desktop PCs/ MacBooks and via your mobile devices (iOS and Android) by following the link here.

    *  Jim Goldberg, owner of the J/109 JUNKYARD DOG has another video out of a recent ocean race outside of San Francisco.

    As Jim says, “This was another wild one, bad, big swells and big winds.  Truth in advertising, we didn't catch any of the spinnaker run on video, too busy trying to the keep the boat sunny side up so I forgot to turn the camera on.  Still some decent footage though! Enjoy!”   Watch the JUNKYARD DOG sailing video here on YouTube.

    * Eight Bells: Julie Goetschius- A long time member of the J/22 fleet, she passed away in Houston, Texas on May 6, 2018 at the age of 63. Julie led the J/22 Fleet 6 as Fleet Captain for many years, chaired countless events, and never missed the opportunity to teach new sailors.

    She was the first woman to hold the title of Houston Yacht Club Champion in 2013, competed in the Adams Cup finals 4 times, the J/22 Worlds in Holland, the Harvest Moon Regatta (winner of the Luna Trophy in 2006), the US Sailing Rolex International Women’s Keelboat Championship, and many other circuit and national events.

    Julie always included new sailors in her crew, no matter how big the event, and always gave back to the sport through supporting the fleet, coaching the Special Olympics Sailing Team at HYC, and being part of the local sailing community.

    She was a counselor at Houston Yacht Club’s Windward Bound Women’s Sailing Camp every year, and so many women across Texas took the helm or flew a spinnaker for the first time on Julie’s boat, CRAYOLA. In 2017, she won HYC’s Fairfax Moody Women’s trophy with, as always, a new sailor as crew.

    Julie’s love for the sport and mischievous sense of humor will be missed on Galveston Bay.  Thanks to Marie Wise for this tribute.
    Add to Flipboard Magazine.

    Read more...
  • J/Newsletter- May 9th, 2018 J/121 Offshore Speedster Spring Tune-Up!
    (Newport, RI)- This weekend, from Friday to Saturday, a number of J/121’s will be stretching their legs, dialing in the numbers, getting crews organized, and working on a combination of boatspeed and boathandling with a focus on this year’s Newport to Bermuda Race that starts in just one month- June 15th!

    J/Boats will base the event out of Newport Shipyard.  With the support of major sailmakers (including North Sails, Quantum Sails, Doyle Sails, UK Sails), a two-day coaching and training session will focus on getting teams up to speed fast, focusing on tuning, sail trim, sail selection & changes, and boathandling. The format will include on-board coaching both days and video debriefs after sailing each day by a panel discussion of sailmakers.

    As an added benefit, each boat will have a RaceQs.com app collecting real-time GPS speed, course, heel, and implied wind direction for post-sailing analysis.  In fact, the data collected from each boat will be broadcast LIVE here on RaceQs.com- http://raceqs.com/regattas/63052

    The schedule is simple.  Friday 1230 hrs is registration and welcome briefing. At 1330 hrs the teams rendezvous off Fort Adams for boat-on-boat testing for speed, trim and tuning all afternoon.  Coaching will be done via “open mike” on VHF so that all teams can learn from each other quickly.  At 1700 hrs will be a post-sail debrief and cocktails and munchies.

    On Saturday, the teams will gather at 0930 hrs for a skippers meeting.  Thereafter, the first “open course” race will be started by 1100 hrs, again with on-water and on-boat coaching.  By 1500 hrs, there will be another debrief and cocktail party with a closing panel discussion.

    Post-race analytics will be displayed by RaceQs.com and the Open Course scoring will be evaluated for the following:

    • Overall winner- elapsed time
    • Winner of each leg- elapsed time
    • Fastest speed- on any leg
    As part of the discussions over the weekend will be 2018 J/121 Open Course Circuit schedule for the northeast region.  The proposed schedule is:
    • Jun 9-10- New York YC Annual Regatta- Newport, RI
    • Jun 15th- Newport to Bermuda Race- Newport, RI
    • Jul 17-21- New York YC Race Week- Newport, RI
    • Aug 17th- Ida Lewis Distance Race- Newport, RI
    • Aug 31st- STC Stamford Vineyard Race- Stamford, CT
    In addition, teams will be contemplating the 2018/ 2019 J/121 Open Course Winter Circuit, which may include:
    • Wirth Munroe Race- Palm Beach, FL
    • Miami to Nassau Race- Miami, FL
    • Lauderdale to Key West Race- Ft Lauderdale, FL
    • Miami to Montego Bay/ Pineapple Cup- Miami, FL
    • RORC 600 Challenge- English Harbour, Antigua
    • Heineken St Maarten- Simpson Bay, St Maarten
    • St Thomas Regatta- Cowpet Bay, USVI
    • BVI Spring Regatta- Tortola, BVI
    • Voiles St Barth Regatta- Gustavia, St Barth
    • Antigua Sailing Week- English Harbour, Antigua
    For more J/121 offshore speedster sailing information
     

     
    Italian J/70 Cup Preview
    (Porto Ercole, Italy)- The second act of the Italian J/70 Cup is about to take place in Porto Ercole with three days of racing scheduled.  The event will be hosted by Club Nautico e della Vela Argentario, and their PRO is planning on a maximum of eight races, with one discard permitted.  The best crew on Saturday will be awarded the Garmin Cup.

    Among the fifty-one crews racing from nine countries (Austria, Great Britain, Germany, Italy, Malta, Monaco, Poland, Russia, Switzerland), there will be the winners of the Sanremo event, both in the overall ranking and in the Corinthian division reserved for non-professionals. Alberto Rossi will be racing with his ENFANT TERRIBLE, assisted in the tactical choices by Branko Brcin; CALVI NETWORK with the tandem team of Noè/ Desiderato; and PETITE TERRIBLE skippered by Claudia Rossi with Michele Paoletti on tactics.

    Among the Corinthians, Paolo Tomsic will try to defend the gold won in Sanremo aboard his LA FEMME TERRIBLE against teams like NOBERASCO DAS skippered by Alessandro Zampori, winner of the Silver fleet in the Audi J/70 World Championship.

    Arriving directly from the Palmavela 52 Super Series in Palma Mallorca, British TP52 owner Peter Harrison chose the Italian J/70 class to test himself with J/70, skippering SORCHA J. Similarly, Vincenzo Onorato will also be there with MASCALZONE LATINO, as well as Giangiacomo Serena di Lapigio with G-SPOTTINO, Mauro Roversi with J-CURVE and the World bronze Medallist- Luca Domenici aboard NOTARO TEAM- LEGGI D’ITALIA.

    Having benefitted from sailing the Warsash Spring Series will be Malta’s Sebastian Ripard, racing CALYPSO for the Royal Malta YC.  And, having sailed all spring are several crews that participated in the YC Monaco Winter J/70 Sportboat Series and the Primo Cup; Stefano Roberti’s Monaco crew on PICCININA, several top Polish teams (Krzysztof Krempec’s EWA, Pawel Tarnowski’s APOTEX, Michal Jablonski’s GTJ, a trio of top Russian teams (the series winner- Valerya Kovalenko’s famous ARTUBE RUS-1 team, Andrey Samoylov’s COMPUTEL, Dmitriy Shunin’s GOLDEN WING), and a top Swiss crew- Tom Studer’s JERRY.

    The Porto Ercole event promises to be the ideal training scenario to compete one last time with the fleet before the J/70 European Championship taking place in Vigo, Spain from June 12th to 16th.

    Moreover, the first two crews in the open division and the first of the Corinthians will earn the right to enter the Marblehead 2018 J/70 World Championship; that event has a limited number of 100 entries for the best crews of each country.

    The next event organized by Italian J/70 Class will be the third act of the Italian J/70 Cup in Malcesine, hosted by Fraglia Vela Malcesine on Lago di Garda July 12th to 15th.  For more Italian J/70 Cup sailing information
     

    J/70 North American Championship Preview
    (Valle de Bravo, Mexico)- The Club de Vela La Pena in Valle de Bravo, Mexico will be hosting the 2018 J/70 North American Championship from May 14th to 19th on their gorgeous mountain lake high above Mexico City.

    Thirty-two boats from Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and the USA will be competing for the North America title over four days of racing.  The top USA boats include Oivind Lorentzen’s NINE from Stamford, CT, Chris Snow’s COOL STORY BRO from San Diego, CA and Tom Bowen’s REACH AROUND from Charleston, SC.  Pablo Despontin’s ARG 707 will be representing Club Nautico San Isidro from Buenos Aires, Argentina (a J/24 champion in South America).  Brazil’s leading team from YC Rio de Janeiro will be skippered by Mauricio Santa Cruz, a four-time J/24 World Champion.

    The large Mexican contingent will have many top sailors vying for class honors from across the spectrum of one-design and offshore sailors.  Those teams include Javier Navarro’s BANDOOLA, Diego Berho’s BBB, Roberto Escalante’s LAMPUGA, Ricardo Brockmann’s VINCITORRE, Luis Barrios’ XPRESS, and Ignacio Perez’s ZAQUERO.  For more J/70 North American Championship sailing information
     

    J/22 Europeans & GPEN J/80 Preview
    (Laveoc, France)- This coming weekend, the Grand Prix Ecole Navale will be taking place in France for over a dozen one-design fleets across five race course areas.  Included in this regatta is the second act for the French J/80 Cup season championship as well as the 2018 J/22 European Championship.

    The J/22s will have a dozen teams competing from France, Germany, and the Netherlands.  The French will be well represented by the defending champion, Patrick Huet’s EUROPEAN HOMES.  The leading Dutch crew may be the TU DELFT BROACH boat skippered by Christiaan Felj.  Then, Germany will have one of its top teams in the hunt, Thomas Loesch’s JOUJOU 3.  Two women’s teams will be vying for top women’s honors, the Netherlands Annefleur De Zeeuw on DJINN HISTOS and the French Helen Maugard on JM sailing for SNO Nantes.

    With forty-four boats, the J/80 class is by far the largest fleet in the event.  Teams are participating from all three coasts in France (Med, Bay of Biscay, North Sea).  The winner of the first event, Patrick Bot on ECOLE NAVALE- CG29, will have his hands full, as more leading crews will be challenging him for a spot on the podium.  Chief amongst those protagonists will be Simon Moriceau’s ARMEN HABITAT; they will be joined by Luc Nadal’s GAN’JA, Ludovic Gilet’s NUMERO J, and Sylvain Pellissier’s INTUITIVE SAILS.  Remember, the J/80 Worlds are taking place in France later this summer, so it’s all “hottin’up” for the local heroes!

    As part of the French J/80 Women’s Cup, there will be ten women’s teams participating.  Also hoping to defend their first position in the first event will be Elodie Bonafous’ ECOLE NAVALE CDV29.  She will be faced by a formidable cadre of the best women sailors in France, including Maxime Rousseaux’s CN ST CAST GRAND OUEST ETIQUETTES from CN St CAST, Helena Lucas’ OMAN SAIL, Stephanie Puyraud’s MODERN BALEINE from Societe Regate Havre, Laurie Buffiere’s TEAM VENDEE FORMATION from Club Nautique Pornic, Claire Montecot’s STARTIJENN from YC Crouesty Arzon, and Anne Phelipon’s NAVIGATLANTIQUE from Societe Regate Rochelaises.  For more GPEN and J/22 Europeans sailing information
     

    North Sea Regatta Preview
    (Scheveningen, The Netherlands)- Hosted by the Jachtclub Scheveningen, the North Sea Regatta is the largest event hosted in the Netherlands each year for a host of one-design classes (dinghies, cats, and keelboats like J/22s and J/80s) and offshore ORC/IRC classes.

    The event kicks off on May 8th with the Vuurschepen Race, a North Sea Regatta Feeder Race that goes from the starting line off The Hague (Scheveningen) and takes a 3 mark course of 130nm across the North Sea to Harwich in the United Kingdom.

    After a two-day layover, on the 11th of May, the RORC North Sea Race takes place along a similar route, but with more northerly buoys to pass to make for a 210nm race to Scheveningen.

    Thereafter, the ORC/ IRC offshore classes enjoy a series of inshore races from May 18th to 20th.  That is when the regatta also kicks off for the J/22 and J/80 classes.

    With seven strong J/crews in sixteen-boat field, it is likely the ORC Two-Handed Class will see the possibility of a sweep of the top honors.  Last year, most major races were won by J/Boat duos.  Leading the charge will be two J/122s, the famous team of John van der Starre and Robin Verhoef on AJETO (2017 Dutch National Double Champion) and Chris Revelman & Pascal Bakker’s JUNIQUE.  Chasing them hard are four J/109s, such as Wim van Slooten & Jochem Hamstra’s FIRESTORM, Paul van der Pol & Adrian Schaml’s YETI, Kees & Camille Mijs’ ARETHUSA, and Abel Blaauw & Sarah Moss’ JIBE.  Hoping to stay in the hunt will be the only all women’s double team- Edith Voskamp & Yvonne Beusker’s familiar black panther painted J/105 called PANTHER!

    In the thirty-two boat ORC/ IRC 2 class are four fast J/109s; including Arnout Jorritsma’s MAJIC, Nick Zondervan’s TEAM HEINER 4, Alain Bornet’s JAI ALAI, and Arjen van Leeuwen’s JOULE.

    Two J/92s will be battling for class honors in the eight-boat ORC 3 class; Luc Oomen’s JINX and Uco Sonnenberg’s JUNO.

    The J/80 class will have a round dozen boats on the starting line for their weekend event.  All the top Dutch boats are present, such as Nick Elsink’s J’ZUSTER, Bernar Holsboer’s JUUL, Otte Jan Golverdingen’s LED2LEASE and Roel Wever’s JOYRIDE.

    With the J/22 Europeans conflicting in France, the J/22’s will be seeing an all-Dutch class of seven boats.  Leading crews include Dirk Jan Verdoorn’s JUT EN JUL, Jesper Overbeeke’s TU DELFT BROACH SJOEFF, Max Groen’s DJINN and Rutger van de Leur’s JUNIOR.  Follow the North Sea Regatta on Facebook here
    For more North Sea Regatta sailing information
     

    Regatta al Sol Race Preview
    (Isla Mujeres, Mexico)- Gulf Coast sailors will be celebrating the 30th sailing of the Regata al Sol from Pensacola, Florida to Isla Mujeres, Mexico. This biennial premier offshore race is sponsored by Southern Yacht Club, Pensacola Yacht Club, and the Club de Yates Isla de Mujeres. The start of the race will be May 9th (cruising class) and May 10th (racing class) 2018. The course angle of 177 deg. will take racers from Pensacola Bay 620nm across the Gulf of Mexico to Isla Mujeres, Mexico just off the Yucatan coast from Cancun. This race offers all the excitement of an offshore race as well as the challenge of navigating the Gulf loop current.

    Eighteen boats are participating in this 30th anniversary race and there are two fast 40+ foot J/teams in the PHRF Racing Class. Patrick Waring’s brand new J/121 HOT PURSUIT has gone through their shakedown/ training program and cannot wait to unleash their beast on the mostly reaching race track.  Giving them a solid run-for-the-money will be Ralph Junius’ proven offshore cruiser-racer, the J/122 MADAM J.

    Based on current forecasts, it should be an interesting 4-5 day race for these offshore thoroughbreds.  After starting in the lightish airs of Pensacola Bay, the boats should encounter most easterly tradewinds (from 80 to 120 deg) of 7-15 kts for the next 4-7 days offshore all the way down the track, around the tip of the Yucatan Peninsula and down to the southeast to the finish line off Isla Mujeres.  Follow the Regata al Sol Race on Facebook here   For more Regatta al Sol Race sailing information
     

    Oregon Offshore Race Preview
    (Portland, OR)- An interview with Dennis Damore about the 2018 Oregon Offshore International Yacht Race gives you a great perspective regards why the event has continually attracted members of the Pacific Northwest offshore community (thanks for contribution from David Schmidt).

    If you’ve ever looked at a chart of the Oregon and Washington coasts, you’re familiar with the fact that this gorgeous stretch of shoreline gets hammered with weather, both in terms of the long-fetch seas and the storms that barrel in across the open Pacific. These waters can be millpond-calm on some days, but things can get nasty quickly, and while this is true of many areas, the rugged coastline is largely void of harbors to dodge the weather.

    Because of this, entering the Corinthian Yacht Club (CYC) of Portland's Oregon Offshore International Yacht Race (May 10-13, 2018) gives skippers and crews a great coastal and open-water adventure while also exposing them to the kinds of preparation needed to engage in bigger events such as a Hawaii race.

    This 193-nautical-mile race starts in Astoria, Oregon, and finishes in Victoria, British Columbia, giving sailors a taste of everything from offshore conditions to the tricky currents that flow through the Strait of Juan de Fuca, while also treating them to one of the most visually stunning racecourses in North America (provided, of course, that the old-growth forests and glacier-capped peaks aren’t shrouded in cloud cover).

    This year’s fleet includes boats from two countries and multiple U.S. states, it ranges in size and sophistication from modest 30-footers to a 70-foot sled, and the race has set up a crew bank for sailors looking to catch rides from Oregon to Canada. Here is the interview with Dennis.

    DS: The Oregon Offshore has a bit of a reputation as a gear-buster race that is often defined by rough weather—is this fair and if so, is the Oregon coast always a washing machine?

    DD: Although the race is called the Oregon Offshore, it really only starts off the Oregon coast and then heads north along the Washington coast to the Straits of Juan de Fuca and then on to Victoria, BC. Like any true offshore race, the conditions are extremely variable. We’ve had years of pounding up the coast contrasted with races, like last year, where it was a downwind ride with squalls setting the pace. We’ve seen dead flat calm off Destruction Island and almost everywhere in the straits at various times. We’ve finished in foulies and in shorts and T-shirts. So, gear-buster? It’s not any more so than any other race. It’s a race of contrasts in scenery, weather, and tactics.

    DS: How are your numbers looking this year versus previous recent editions? Also, what percentage of your 2018 fleet is American vs. Canadian (or other international entries) and is this percentage typical of this event?

    DD: This year is gearing up to be a well-participated race. We average about 20-25 boats each year. Roughly 40 percent are Canadian, with several more from the Seattle area. Right now we are feeling pretty good that 30 percent of this year’s entries are first timers from out of state. We have been focusing on a grassroots marketing movement that seems to finally be paying off. Our best performance was in 2014 with 30 entries, and we happened to get epic wind conditions for that race.

    DS: Strategy wise, what are the biggest considerations of the race’s 196 nautical mile course? What about tactics? Are there any bits of the course that typically require all hands on deck, say for a 0200 hours tack or gybe?

    DD: This is a navigator’s race. What makes the Oregon Offshore a unique experience is that, from a tactical perspective, it is really three distinct races in one: the race up the coast, the race down the straits, and the passage through Race Rocks to the finish. Each segment has very different tactical considerations. After the start, in a typical northwest breeze, there are current and wind-shift considerations that can be challenging. Some years, boats stay within miles of the coastline, carefully avoiding crab pots and jutting-out landmasses like Destruction Island. Other years, we will see boats out twenty miles or more. After entering the Strait [of Juan de Fuca], knowledge of the tide conditions and being able to anticipate the direction, timing and strength of the typical Westerly [breeze], coupled with the critical decision of when to cross to the Vancouver Island side, require a whole new set of tactics to avoid shipping lanes and current, and to maximize wind angles. Then comes Race Rocks with the decision to cut through or sail around that [waypoint] can make or break the race. This is most likely going to be your 0200 hours, all-hands-on-deck situation. Then you just pray the wind doesn’t shut off before you coast into the harbor.

    DS: Given that the “brochure” for Hawaii races typically calls for a rough first two or three days, followed by trade-wind sailing, is the Oregon Offshore a good stepping-stone event for bigger offshore passages, or do you see it more as it’s own stand-alone event?

    DD: We like to think of it as both. Despite being a relatively short race, the race provides valuable experience and practice in preparing a boat for offshore conditions, giving crew valuable offshore experience, building a crew into a cohesive team and, probably most memorably, giving participants a valuable and ever-expanding store of great stories to tell. Moreover, it is a qualifying race for the Vic-Maui, and is also a means for Oregon[-based] skippers to get their boats north to participate in the Swiftsure International race. While some might consider doing it only as a shakedown cruise for their Hawaii race, it really is its own adventure. There is a reason why we have multiple participants who have done the race over twenty times. You get the adrenal rush of offshore racing in the space of just a few days, rather than the week and half or more it takes to get to Hawaii.

    DS: Obviously an offshore race is just that, but has the event tried to do anything to “green-up” and reduce it’s environmental footprint?

    DD: Over the years there has been a growing understanding and respect for the responsibility all of the participants have to keep a clean footprint. [For example,] we have reduced the amount of printed materials we use to promote the race, and [we] have opted for face-to-face meetings and focused more on social media. While [we] have not made a deliberate attempt to associate ourselves with outside organizations, there is always more we can do in this regard and partnering with a national organization is on our short list of things to do for future races (hint, hint national organizations).

    DS: Anything else that you’d like to add, for the record?

    DD: There are two cool things that make this race unique. One is that we have someone blog through the entire race so friends, family and race supporters at home can get a more in depth understanding of what is happening in real time. In conjunction with the race trackers, this creates an edge-of-your-seat experience for even those who have never stepped foot onboard. And two, we greet each boat in Victoria, BC with warm wet towels and champagne!

    In the 2018 edition of the Oregon Offshore, twenty-three boats are entered, six are J/teams (26% of the fleet, a significant increase over last year).  Those rugged, adventurous souls include the following crews:

    J/46 RIVA- She is based in Portland, Oregon and skippered by Scott Campbell. She has had an active racing schedule since 2003 with almost annual participation in both the Oregon Offshore and Swiftsure races. She has taken first place trophies numerous times in both races in her division and class. She is also a three-time veteran of the Pacific Cup race from San Francisco to Hawaii in 2006, 2010, and 2016 and also the Van Isle 360 race in 2013. RIVA will stay to compete in the Swiftsure Cape Flattery race.

    J/122 ANAM CARA- Her Portland-based skipper, Tom Kelly, will close the gap this year for participating in the most Oregon Offshores ever. This will be Tom's 37th year (this will be the 42nd year of the race period, so this is quite the feat)! ANAM CARA is no stranger to the race, with a 2013 First Overall Win under her belt. She has also performed well in Swiftsure's Cape Flattery with two Overall wins and a Second Overall, to boot.

    J/42 VELOCITY- He's back for more punishment! Hood River based skipper, Tom Keffer, and his VELOCITY crew will be racing hard aboard his J/42 in the A2 class again this year. These guys know how to work the coast and Straits (not to mention they are usually up for some post-race shenanigans, too)!

    J/105 FREE BOWL OF SOUP- Team Free Bowl of Soup began in 1999 with a J/24, now being campaigned in Seattle as "Sopa Libre" by one of the team members. In 2011, a 3-way partnership was formed with Eric Hopper, Matt Davis, and Doug Schenk to acquire a J/105 to continue to race Offshore races, including Pacific Cup, as well as regional One-Design races. This will be the Soup's sixth Oregon Offshore, with the highlight being the overall win in 2017! The Soup guys will also be competing in the Swiftsure Cape Flattery race this year.

    J/105 ABSTRACT- This is their second Oregon Offshore.  After an action-packed year of one-design racing throughout the Pacific Northwest, skipper Doug Pihlaja plans to compete in this year’s Swiftsure and the 2019 Pacific Cup in the Double-hand division!

    J/30 TAKU- Yet another new participant! Hailing from Bellingham, WA, skipper Theo Singelis and crew will race their beloved J/30 TAKU. Over that past five years, they have been participating in the Pacific Northwest's longer races that include Swiftsure, Southern Straights, Race to the Straights and Round the County. Some of their best results have been Second in class in last year's Swiftsure Juan de Fuca race, which they will be participating in again this year.  For Oregon Offshore Race sailing & tracking information
     

    J/46 Rendezvous @ Camden Classic Cup!
    (Camden, Maine)- “Greetings from the Caribbean,” says Tom Babbitt. “I had a crazy idea this winter while cruising the eastern Caribbean and reflecting that there are at least eight J/46’s based in Maine.....we should do something together!

    Lyman-Morris runs an excellent event in late July based at Camden Yacht Club- it’s the Camden Classics Cup.  And, with a minimum 4 boats we can have a one-design start, trophies and a wonderful time.  A few years ago I was able to get six J/160’s on the line and it was a blast!

    Our one design rules would be as follows (so no one gets out of cruising trim):
    *  Appropriate cruising anchor and chain in place on the bow
    *  Dodger up and in place
    *  jib maximum is 100%, no Genoa’s
    *  no spinnakers
    *  auto pilots, electric winches and whisker poles permitted
    *  single handed, double handed or a whole gang of crew all good
    *  deep draft will carry a PHRF handicap relative to shoal draft boats- per Rod Johnstone’s recommendation

    Come one, come all, love to see you all there from anywhere!”

    For more information, contact Tom at email- bravoj42@gmail.com or cell +1-207-632-1262. He is currently delivering his J/46 BRAVO from the Caribbean (St Thomas) to Maine.  For more Camden Classics Cup sailing information
     

    J/Sailing News

    The Sun Never Sets on J's Sailing Worldwide

    Across the world of sailing, there were several significant events for J/Sailors that took place in the Americas (North & South), Europe, and the Caribbean.

    For starters, the 41st J/24 North American Championship just took place in Charleston, South Carolina, hosted by the Charleston YC.  Not far off to the north, the Annapolis YC hosted their annual Helly Hansen Annapolis NOOD Regatta on Chesapeake Bay for big one-design fleets of J/22s, J/24s, J/70s, J/80s, J/30s, J/35s, J/105s, and J/111s.  Also sailing on the east coast was the finale for the American YC Spring Series for one-design fleets of J/70s, J/88s, J/105s, J/109s, and J/44s.

    Out west on the left coast of America, there was an enormous amount of activity taking place up and down the Pacific coastline.  Up in the Pacific Northwest, it was the occasion for the famous Sloop Tavern YC to host their Race to the Straits from Seattle to Port Townsend, WA for a mostly double-handed fleet of J/105s, J/80s, J/109s, J/120, J/35, J/27, J/29, J/37C, J/35C, J/46, J/145, and J/122.  Off to their south, the St Francis YC hosted the J/105 J/Stop on San Francisco Bay for a huge fleet of 23 boats.  Moving further south down the coast, the Santa Barbara Sailing Club held their enormously popular Cinco de Mayo Regatta off Santa Barbara, CA for enthusiastic fleets of J/70s and J/24s.  Heading still further south, it was one of the signature events for the San Diego YC, their strongly attended Yachting Cup for one-design fleets of J/70s, J/105s, and J/120s.

    In the Southern part of the Americas, it was the last 2018 J/70 Worlds qualifiers for the Chilean J/70 fleet.  The Cofradía Náutica del Pacífico took place off Algarrobo, Chile in what could only be described as “bizarre” sailing conditions off the Pacific coast- fog and breeze!!  Hmmm, something most often known as “June gloom” off Santa Barbara and Los Angeles or even off Newport, RI.

    Just north of South America, the Caribbean winter sailing circuit finally concluded with the epic Antigua Sailing Week held off English Harbour.  Involved were the usual suspects of leading teams on J/122s, a J/109, and J/30 collecting even more silverware for their trophy dens/ shelves/ caves.

    Hopping over to the European theatre of sailing, the RORC (Royal Offshore Racing Club) started off their epic summer season of offshore sailing with their Cervantes Trophy Race- from Cowes to Le Havre, France.  Incredibly, it marked a J/133 “three-peat”, a podium J/121 offshore speedster debut, a winning J/109 and J/105!  Over in Europe’s gorgeous Alps, it was the next event for the J/70 Swiss Sailing League in Kreuzlingen, Switzerland on the Bodensee.  Then, down in the Mediterranean, it was the first major offshore event for the Spanish offshore sailing season- the famous PalmaVela sailed off Palma Majorca, Spain- a fleet of J/80s had a fabulous time soaking up the atmosphere of one of Europe’s most famous and “glam” yachting watering holes.

    Read on! The J/Community and Cruising section below has many entertaining stories and news about J/Sailors as well as cruising blogs about those who continue to enjoy the Caribbean and the South Pacific, staying warm while others are trying to stay warm up north.  Check them out!  More importantly, if you have more J/Regatta News, please email it or  upload onto our J/Boats Facebook pag  Below are the summaries.

    Regatta & Show Schedules:

    May 11-13- ALCATEL J/70 Cup- Porto Ercole, Italy
    May 14-19- J/70 North American Championship- Valle de Bravo, Mexico
    May 18-20- North Sea Regatta- The Hague, The Netherlands
    May 24-28- J/Cup United Kingdom- Cowes, Isle of Wight, England
    May 25- Storm Trysail Block Island Race- Larchmont, NY
    May 25-28- The FIGAWI Race- Hyannisport, MA
    May 26- Spinnaker Cup Offshore Race- Belvedere, CA
    May 26-28- Swiftsure International Yacht Race- Victoria, BC, Canada
    May 26-28- U.K. J/24 National Championship- Poole, England
    May 28-29- Coastal Cup Race- Santa Barbara, CA
    May 31- SoCal 300 Race- San Diego, CA

    For additional J/Regatta and Event dates in your region, please refer to the on-line J/Sailing Calendar.

    J/70 RIMETTE Awarded Annapolis NOOD Regatta Overall Champion
    (Annapolis, MD)- Warm weather, sunny skies and moderate breeze set the stage for a solid day of racing on the Chesapeake Bay for the first day of the Helly Hansen National Offshore One Design (NOOD) Regatta in Annapolis on Friday. All classes on three race courses completed five races to kick off the three-day event.  Then, Saturday dawned with a light northerly breeze fiasco with only a few fleets completing one race.  Sunday dawned with little more promise, giving most fleets a chance for two more races in yet more light northerly winds.

    In the end, it was John Brim of Palm Beach, Florida, and his crew on the J/70 RIMETTE that not only scored their first-ever major regatta win in the J/70 class, but also earned the coveted title of Overall Winner at the event.  Here is how it all went down for the three-day event.

    Friday- Gorgeous Southerly and Sun!
    With 32 boats registered each, the J/22 and the J/70 fleets were tied for largest of the weekend. The J/22s had an especially competitive roster this year as competitors prepare for their J/22 World Championship in Annapolis in September. The day’s J/22 class leader, Pete Levesque, of Tiverton, Rhode Island, said it’s still anyone’s game.

    “The top five are all going fast and, even behind them, there are a bunch of people who are capable of winning races,” he said. “It’s a pretty deep fleet.”

    Levesque and his crew on Dusty took a conservative approach to the day, establishing a one-point lead over Jeff Todd’s HOT TODDY, of Annapolis, after five races. Facing an “uphill current and an aggressive fleet,” Levesque wanted to get off the starting line cleanly and avoid taking risks.

    “It is my first time back at it in Annapolis in a while and first time sailing in a fleet this size in a while, so I just wanted to tip-toe into it,” he said. “We’ll probably have to take more risks as the weekend goes on.”

    J/70 class leader John Brim, of Palm Beach, Florida, found success was on the western edge of the course, where, in one race, he and his crew aboard RIMETTE found tide relief and breeze in a pivotal moment on a downwind leg, which resulted in a five-boat recovery that he said was a big factor in his team’s overall lead.

    But, the strategy didn’t work in their favor on the last race of the day, when team RIMETTE— already several places deep in the fleet— made its move to the west and watched as the boats sailing straight down the middle of the course gained speed. They held a strong lead most of the day, but that 10th-place finish left them narrowly ahead of class veteran Brian Keane on SAVASANA.

    The RIMETTE skipper also found the variable conditions challenging, with shifty winds and a “fair amount of chop” thrown into the mix. He said his crew found it was best to keep sailing through the chop than try to sail around the unavoidable waves. He also credited a brand-new mainsail and “fantastic” trim and tactical work by his crew for team RIMETTE’s first-place standing at the end of day one.

    The J/80 fleet’s opening day leader on COURAGEOUS, skipper Gary Panariello, of Sausalito, California, echoed Brim’s analysis of the conditions out on the racecourse.

    “Every single race was different,” he said. “All the things we thought would work didn’t, so we just had to pay attention to what was going on during each race. The pressure was better on the west side of the course for most of the day, but by the end of the day, the right side worked just as well as the left. Which is really interesting in Annapolis, because it’s usually a much more one-sided [advantaged] racecourse.”

    Sunday- Light Airs Finale
    After the virtual glass-out on Saturday where only the Yellow course managed to complete one race, the rest of the day’s racing for all fleets on all courses was canceled.

    Sunday dawned with some promise, with the northerly winds showing a somewhat steady 6-8 kts of breeze.  However, the forecast was for it to die slowly and shift east.  What transpired was nothing like the forecast, with the breeze dying fast and oscillating back and forth from 350 deg to 60 deg across the race course and with huge, spotty wind streaks dropping down to 1-3 kts at times.  To say it was rough and challenging on tacticians and sail trimmers would be an understatement.

    Victory didn’t come easily for the J/70 team on RIMETTE. In fact, it all came down to the eighth and final race of the weekend. Heading into it in second place, the crew had difficulty getting off the starting line and then committed a port-starboard foul, for which they had to perform a penalty turn in light air. Fortunately, Rimette’s tactician Taylor Canfield soon made a call that put them on the path to redemption.

    “We were mid-fleet after the penalty turn, but our tactician was brilliant,” Brim said. “He saw a breeze and we went hard left. I focused my eyes on the jib and the waves, and the next thing I knew we were lifted to port-tack with fresher breeze. We rounded the mark in second, amazingly.”

    From there, third-place NINE sailed by Oivind Lorentzen worked its way between RIMETTE and SAVASANA, which was holding the top spot at the time. Brim’s team finished that race in second, gaining the necessary two points to tie with Brian Keane’s Savasana. The tiebreaker— based on which team has the most first-place race finishes— worked in Brim’s favor, as team RIMETTE had three to SAVASANA’s two.

    “Frankly, we were surprised at the whole thing, and delighted,” Brim said, whose crew also included Scott Ewing and Collin Leon. “I’ve sailed in Annapolis many times and it’s always a challenging place, but this weekend was one of the nicest Annapolis regattas I remember.”

    As the Helly Hansen Annapolis NOOD’s overall winner, Brim earns a berth in the Helly Hansen NOOD Caribbean Championship Regatta, presented by Sunsail in the British Virgin Islands in October.

    Behind the two leaders, it was Lorentzen’s NINE that secured third place, followed by Doug Clark’s POLAR from the US Coast Guard Academy in fourth and Bruno Pasquinelli’s STAMPEDE from Fort Worth, TX in fifth.

    Winning the J/70 Corinthians division was Jennifer & Ray Wulff’s JOINT CUSTODY from Annapolis, MD.  Second was Henry Filter’s WILD CHILD, third Tod Sackett’s FM, fourth Jack & Vivien Wallace’s SELKIE, and fifth Mark Hilman’s USA 6.

    Like Brim, this was the first Helly Hansen Annapolis NOOD win for Gary Panariello, whose COURAGEOUS team took the top spot in the competitive J/80 fleet, where only two points separate the first and third finishers in the final standings.

    “This is very typical of J/80 racing,” Panariello said. “It’s usually this tight. All of the people at the top of the fleet are very good. We had a sizable lead going into the day and our goal was just to be in first place when we finished. We weren’t very aggressive about what we did, and we were just able to hang on.”

    After a “tough” first race, where Panariello finished well behind the second-place boat in the standings, team COURAGEOUS had one goal in the last race.

    “We just needed to stay near Thomas Kopp’s KOPP-OUT no matter where they went on the racecourse,” he said. “And that’s what we did. We followed them around and made sure we didn’t get disconnected from them or let any boats between us.”

    Behind the two leaders were John White’s USA 1162 in third, Les Beckwith’s FKA fourth, and Mike Hobson’s MELTEMI in fifth.

    Similarly, local J/22 class winner Zeke Horowitz and the UNCLE FLUFFY had to face their own challenges today despite starting the day with a strong lead. A bad start during race one landed them in the back of the 32-boat fleet.

    “We had a really good comeback in the first race,” Horowitz said. “There was definitely luck involved in that one, no doubt about it. On the final beat, we were out right hard and a big shift with pressure filled in. We probably passed 20 boats or more the last two minutes into the finish. It was one of those moments where you cross the line and you’re like, ‘How did that just happen?’”

    The team then had to recover from another bad start in the second race, where they were able to claw their way to first place after rounding the first mark in eleventh. Horowitz said he knew all they needed was to complete the race in the top 10 to maintain their overall position, which made the eventual win even more sweet.

    “It was really fun to be able to win the last race in a regatta like this,” he said. “These crews sailed great and really fast, and they’re extremely hard to beat. We’re really fortunate to be in the spot that we are.”

    Rounding out the top five places were Jeff Todd’s HOT TODDY in second, Pete Levesque’s DUSTY in third, JR Maxwell’s SCOOBY in fourth and Aden King’s RHYTHMIC PUMPING in fifth place.

    For the six-boat J/24 class, it was yet another class that determined the winner based on a tie-breaker.  Pat Fitzgerald’s RUSH HOUR and Pete Kassal’s SPACEMAN SPIFF each finished with 16 pts each, with countback going to Fitzgerald’s team based on number of 1sts.  Third place wen to Peter Rich’s BUXTON with 20 pts total.

    The ten-boat J/30 class saw a repeat winner from last year.  Bob Rutsch’s BEBOP won two races and took three 2nds to comfortably win their class.  They were followed by Doug & Amy Stryker’s TOTALED MAYHEM in second and Ron Anderson’s INSATIABLE in third position.

    With a half-dozen boats, the betting was how many races were Jim Sagerholm & Jerry Christofel’s fabled AUNT JEAN were going to win??  In the end, just five in seven races for an easy win with 12 pts total.  The real battle was for the next two spots on the podium.  Trading 2nds and 3rds all weekend, it was ultimately the ABIENTOT crew with skipper Roger Lant that took the silver by one point over Chuck Kohlerman’s team on MEDICINE MAN.

    As the biggest big boat fleet on the Bay, the eighteen-boat J/105 class is always a challenging fleet to race in due to the many class veterans that continue to sharpen the tools of the trade each year.  This time, it was a near (and surprising) “white washing” of the fleet by Cedric Lewis & Fred Salvesen’s MIRAGE, winning five of seven races for a mere total of 16 pts!  Second was the tenacious crew on-board Andrew Kennedy’s BAT IV.  However, speaking of “tenacious”, it was Carl & Scott Gitchell’s TENACIOUS that finished only one point back to take the bronze.

    As anticipated, the eight-boat J/111 class was going to be a “shoot-out @ the OK Corral”.  Indeed it was.  With a multitude of champions in the class in attendance, it was not going to be a battle for the faint of heart.  Multiple gladiators squared off and, in the end, it was local hotshot Martie Roesch’s crew on VELOCITY that avoided the major pitfalls to take the title with a final race win.  Going into the final race, Peter Wagner’s J/111 World Champion SKELETON KEY team had the lead by two points.  So long as Wagner’s crew maintained contact with VELOCITY, with even one boat in between, they won the regatta.  Somehow, it wasn’t so.  Just six points back was Rob Ruhlman’s Cleveland, OH team on their famous SPACEMAN SPIFF. Perhaps the highlight for the J/111 crews was the “huuuuge” fiesta for the “Derby de Mayo” party at Roesch’s house on Saturday evening; after all, racing was canceled at 1:30pm, so the crews had plenty of time to don sombreros, feathered boa hats, and drink whatever moved them- mint juleps or massive pitchers of margaritas!  Sailing photo credits- Paul Todd/ Outside Images  For more Helly Hansen Annapolis MOOD Regatta sailing information
     

    Ingham Crowned J/24 NA Champ By A Nose!
    (Charleston, SC)- Thirty-five J/24s teams descended upon Charleston, South Carolina for the J/24 North American Championship at Charleston Yacht Club. Blessed with three straight days of good onshore breezes to help overcome the strong tides that Charleston Harbor is notorious for, the CYC PRO managed to run eight races for the teams from USA and Mexico.

    Winning the 2018 41st edition of the J/24 NA’s was Mike Ingham’s NAUTALYTICS crew of Swedish goddess Marianne Schoke, Max Holzer, Justin Coplan and Quinn Schwenker. There’s was not an easy win as it took until the final day, final race, and final leg for the Shakespearean drama to play out for them to win on a tie-breaker over Will Welles’ BOGUS from Newport, RI.

    Day One- Strong Start
    After four races, Welles’ BOGUS got off to a solid start in attempting to earn his fourth consecutive North American title. Following a 3-5 in the first two contests, Welles banged out two bullets to end the day with 10 points. Carter White’s YOUREGATTA notched scores of 4-1-3-8 for 16 points and second place. John Mollicone’s HELLY HANSEN held third place with 18 points.

    Under clear skies and in breeze between 5-10 knots, Mike Ingham’s NAUTALYTICS opened the Championship with a victory, with Mollicone and Welles behind him. White moved up to the top spot in race two, in front of Robby Brown’s ANGEL OF HARLEM. Welles took the next two battles, ahead of Mexican Kenneth Porter’s MONSTER FISH and White in race three, and Aidan Glackin’s MENTAL FLOSS in the final duel.

    Day Two- Light & Goofy
    While three teams were tied on points for second through fourth place, they were all looking up at Welles’ Bogus that kept a hold on the top spot with 13 net points in six races so far. A harbor postponement started the day. Racing got underway at 1400 hours in winds of just 6 knots.

    BOGUS recorded a sixth in Saturday’s opening race, but able to discard it and add a third in the day’s only other contest, to lead the fleet. Ingham’s NAUTALYTICS leapt up the leaderboard into the silver position, although he shared a tally of 20 points with White’s YOUREGATTA and Mollicone’s HELLY HANSEN.

    In the first race of the day, Mark Laura’s BABA LOUIE from Seattle, WA crossed the finish line ahead of James Howard’s CLASSIC and Travis Odenbach’s HONEYBADGER. Ingham made his move in the next battle, as the breeze increased to 10-12 knots. Following him were Mollicone and Welles.

    Day Three- Anxiety-ridden Finale
    Ingham’s NAUTALYTICS came on strong down the stretch to edge out reigning Champion Welles’ BOGUS and win on a tie-breaker.

    Ingham entered Sunday’s racing seven points behind Welles. A NAUTALYTICS bullet in the day’s first race, followed by a third, put the pressure on Welles, who recorded a 17 with a scoring penalty (his discard) and then a 5 to tie the two teams on points at 24.

    Ingham broke Welles’ three-year North American Championship winning streak from 2015-2017, and it was actually Ingham who held the title prior to that in 2014. Mollicone’s HELLY HANSEN completed the top three overall with 30 points.

    “We were third and Will was fourth at the last rounding of the last race,” recalled Ingham, knowing he needed to put one more boat in between them to secure the Championship. “We match raced the final leg. John Mollicone passed Will, and we maintained!” Ingham noted how tough a venue like Charleston can be due to the current and big shifts. “It’s a heads-up venue. You’ll have bad moments, but the teams who survive those moments will excel. We definitely picked a bad side a bunch of times, but we recognized it and got out. The key is reacting quicker than the next guy.”

    Rounding out the top five were White’s YOUREGATTA in fourth and Argentina’s Nicolas Cubria’s ELVIS in fifth, by virtue of winning the last race!

    Finally, of the two women’s teams entered, Erica Beck Spencer’s SEA BAGS WOMEN’S SAILING TEAM from Portland, ME was 1st followed by Amy Kubie’s LONESTAR.  For J/24 NA race results and regatta information   For more Charleston YC host information
     

    Three-peat Overall for J/133 PINTIA In RORC Cervantes Race!
    J/121 ROCK LOBSTER Rocks in IRC 1 Debut!
    (Cowes, Isle of Wight, England)- The overall winner of the 2018 Cervantes Trophy Race after IRC time correction is Gilles Fournier's French J/133 PINTIA, winning the Cervantes Trophy for a third year in a row. And, in her RORC Offshore Racing debut, it was Nick Angel’s brand new British J/121 ROCK LOBSTER that took second in IRC One class!

    Forty-seven yachts competed in the Cervantes Trophy Race, the first summer race of the 2018 RORC Season's Points Championship. It was a glassy start to the race, with a light breeze and a warm sunshine bathing the Solent. The Royal Ocean Racing Club chose to select a course of approximately 130 nautical miles, with strategic and tactical decision required for the Solent start, crossing the English Channel, the North Coast of France, and a reaching finish into Le Havre. After a light airs downwind start, the fleet experienced a building breeze overnight in the English Channel from the northeast, increasing boat speed towards Cussy Buoy, nine miles off the Normandy Coast. A light wind 23-mile beat to navigational buoy A5, was followed by a fresh broad reach to the finish, giving the fleet a variety of wind angles in which to maximize their performance.

    Gilles Fournier was delighted to win the Cervantes Trophy and celebrated in his home club Société des Régates du Havre, having won by nearly 40 minutes on corrected IRC handicap time over a brand-new JPK 11.80 IRC rule-beater. Speaking to RORC Racing Manager, Chris Stone, Gilles commented. “It was a tactical race, but I have to admit a lucky one for us as well. Staying in the best breeze was the key, and we found breeze west of the rhumb-line in the Channel, and for the last beat we managed to keep boat speed up by heading east after Cussy Buoy.”

    In IRC One,  Nick Angel's brand new, freshly launched, British J/121 ROCK LOBSTER was second in her class; she was just 12 minutes off from winning her race debut in class.

    In IRC Three, third was Rob Cotterill's J/109 MOJO RISIN’. Then, in IRC Two-handed Class, Jerry Freeman's J/105 JULIETTE was third.

    The RORC Season's Points Championship continues Friday 11th May with the North Sea Race, approximately 180 nautical miles from Harwich to Scheveningen.   Sailing photo credits- Paul Wyeth   For more RORC Offshore series sailing information
     

    J/70 TSUNAMI Tops Cofradía Náutica del Pacífico
    (Algarrobo, Chile)- The 2018 J/70 Worlds qualifier for the Chilean J/70 class took place this past weekend in Algarrobo.  The event was called the Cofradía Náutica del Pacífico and eighteen boats participated over the weekend.

    The weather condition was different and stronger than expected and the teams enjoy the series of six races. Two were run on Saturday and four on Sunday.  The first race on Saturday was thrown out due to an improper mark change, so an extra race was added on Sunday.

    Conditions on Saturday were quite rare, with west winds and fog blowing onshore!  In the first windward-leeward race, the fog made it impossible to see the leeward mark! So, combine the crazy weather conditions with the tough fleet and made it much more complex than usual.

    During the two days, especially downwind, gybing onto port at the weather mark to get into the stronger sea breeze was the best strategy. So, all teams worked hard to perform their gybe-set maneuver to gain or maintain advantage on the boats around them.

    In the end, the winner was determined by a tie-breaker.  Winning the countback on 12 pts was Andrés Ducasse’s TSUNAMI, while Juan Reid’s WINDMADE had to settle for 2nd place.  Taking the bronze was Pablo Amunátegui’s KENMORE with 17 pts, fourth was Vernon Robert’s MORENITA with 20 pts, and fifth was Carlos Vergara’s SENSEI with 25 pts.

    This was the final regatta in the three event qualifying series for the 2018 J/70 Worlds in Marblehead, MA, USA.  Chile took 1 slot from the J/70 South American Champion and 2 more due to having 33 boats in the Chilean national fleet.  Therefore, the following three boats qualified and will be attending the J/70 Worlds this year in the USA- 1st TSUNAMI (Ducasse), 2nd VOLVO (Matias Seguel & Mark Jux), and 3rd WINDMADE (Reid).

    The J/70 Fleet will be back to Algarrobo on May 19th to celebrate the Chilean Navy Week again in Cofradía Náutica del Pacífico.
     

    J/70 TANGAROA Wins Yachting Cup Overall!
    (San Diego, CA)- Seventy-nine teams competed in ten fleets in the 2018 Yachting Cup, held May 5-6 in San Diego, CA. David Hochart’s J/70 team on TANGAROA won the final race to secure their class victory and get recognized as the overall event winner.

    Hosted by the San Diego YC, the 2018 Yachting Cup was held from May 4th to 6th off the promontory of Point Loma and in the South Bay southeast of the city of San Diego. The Yachting Cup is one of SDYC’s signature events.  The principal one-design classes in the regatta were J/70s, J/105s, and J/120s. In addition, there were PHRF Offshore handicap classes.

    The J/70s had a dozen boats racing, with seven races sailed over the two days. Winning was Hochart’s TANGAROA with three bullets in their scoreline and a total of 16 pts next.  Second was Chris Snow’s COOL STORY BRO with 19 pts and third was Jay Janov’s MINOR THREAT with 23 pts.  Rounding out the top five were Curt Johnson’s AVET 2.01 and Jim Murrell’s HUCKLEBERRY in 4th and 5th, respectively.

    Nine teams sailed in the challenging J/105 fleet.  While generally a very close battle for the podium, it was anything but this year.  Somehow, Stew Cannon’s crew on J-OK found the “whup-ass” button and hit it hard every race, posting three bullets and tossing a 4th to win with just 12 pts net, 6 pts clear of last year’s winner- Rick Goebel & Donica Ryder’s SANITY.  Third was the duo of Hurlburt & Driscoll on JUICED, like SANITY, throwing out a last race DSQ to secure their position.  Rounding out the top five were Rich Bergmann’s ZUNI BEAR in 4th and Steve & Lucy Howell’s BLNIK in 5th.

    Perhaps the most crushing performance came in the very competitive J/120 fleet.  Talk about a “schooling”, John Laun’s CAPER crew truly achieved one of the most amazing performances ever in the class, winning with all 1sts and having to throw out a 1st to win with only 5 pts! In the meantime, it seems everyone else conceded the win to CAPER while the next three boats spent the weekend trading body blows every race. In the end, second place for three boats was determined by a one point spread and a tie-breaker! It was so tight that it came down to the last race and the last run home to the finish line to determine who-beat-who! Rudolph Hasl’s HASL FEE finished with a 3rd to close with 14 pts total, enough to secure the silver.  However, Chuck Nichol’s CC RIDER crew must certainly feel the pain, as in the last race they dropped from a certain 2nd place to third after posting a 5th in the final race.  That created a tie-breaker on 15 pts each between CC RIDER and Ernie Pennell’s MAD MEN, with Nichol’s taking 3rd on the countback.

    In PHRF C Division, it was David Boatner’s J/35 RIVAL that placed 2nd, while Geoff Davis’ J/35 ZFORCE took 4th place- a great show for the venerable J/35 in sunny SD! Sailing photo credits- Bronny Daniels/ JOYSAILING.com  For more Yachting Cup sailing information
     

    Classic, Gorgeous Antigua Sailing Week
    (Falmouth Harbour, Antigua)- One hundred and sixteen teams from 37 different countries raced in the 51st edition of Antigua Sailing Week held from April 29 to May 4. Strong trade winds blew all week, delivering classic Caribbean conditions to over 1,000 competitors.

    Over 3,000 revelers attended Reggae in the Park, featuring international reggae artist Tarrus Riley and Peter Harrison’s Superyacht SOJANA (a Farr 115 foot ketch) was awarded the coveted Lord Nelson Trophy after a perfect scoreline of seven race wins in CSA 2 (Peter is racing his J/70 SORCHA J in this weekend’s Italian J/70 Cup in Porto Ercole, Italy).

    “This is fantastic. It is the second time we have won the Lord Nelson Trophy and I am really thrilled to win it again,” commented Peter Harrison, owner of SOJANA. “We have had beautiful crew work, everybody was really on their game. We had our boat restored three years ago and have new sails and the crew have all done her justice.”

    Added SOJANA crew boss Jonny Malbon, “This week has been amazing, with perfect conditions for SOJANA; breezy and lumpy and full-on. We have pushed ourselves and the boat. The crew is very diverse; we have a couple of young guys from the National Sailing Academy of Antigua and professional sailors from all over the world. We broke a few things, but always repaired them. It has been an epic week and the boss is super-happy. This is his favourite regatta, because it’s intense and fun.”

    In the dozen-boat CSA 5 Class, the famous J/122 EL OCASO, sailed by Kym Kapalla, started off slowly with an 8-7-6 and closed fast with a steady 3-3-2-2 to take fourth place with 23 pts net.  Perhaps with a bit more practice beforehand, they may have had a great chance for 2nd or 3rd in their class.  Pamala Baldwin’s J/122 LIQUID suffered a DSQ in their 6th race, hurting their chances for a top five finish.

    In the nine-boat CSA 7 Class, David Cullen’s Irish crew aboard his J/109 POCKET ROCKET sailed a solid series to take the bronze.

    Finally, in CSA 8 Class, it was Tanner Jone’s Antiguan crew on the J/30 BLUE PETER/ CARIBBEAN ALLIANCE INSURANCE that lost a tie-breaker on 16 pts each for third place on the podium.  Sailing photo credits- Paul Wyeth/ PWPictures.com  For more Antigua Sailing Week sailing information
     

    J/80 OPERA SEASON Wins Palma Vela
    (Palma Majorca, Spain)- The 15th edition of the Sail Racing PalmaVela ended on a high note after four days of racing.  The sailors experienced the entire spectrum of wind intensities between just two and more than 20 knots, days in full sun and others under heavy rain, but always with the common denominator of exciting competition in the bay of Palma. 132 boats of 26 nationalities fought for glory, including a J/80 class with sailors from Spain, Germany, and United Kingdom.

    The final day saw a gentle, challenging breeze on a gorgeous sunny day on the Bay of Palma.  The pressure of performing in the fluky, shifty winds determined which teams collected the winners' trophies at this traditional Mediterranean season opener.

    For the J/80 class, that meant the German skipper, Thomas Bscher (on Pedro Mari’s J/80 OPERA SEASON), would finish with an almost perfect championship scoreline!  They won the last two races to add to their 1sts in the first four races to close with just 9 pts net, six points clear of the next boat. Second and third, respectively, were taken by two German teams, Sebastian Allebrodt’s MNEMONIC and Kristyn Gills’ JOTA JUERGA.

    The 15th Sail Racing PalmaVela was organized by the Real Club Náutico de Palma and the Royal Spanish Sailing Federation, with the sponsorship of Sail Racing, the institutional sponsorship of the Balearic Government and the City Council of Palma, and with the collaboration of the Balearic Sailing Federation, Club Náutic S'Arenal and the Port Authority of the Balearic Islands.  For more J/80 PalmaVela sailing information
     

    SV Kreuzlingen Leads Swiss J/70 Sailing League
    (Kreuzlingen, Switzerland)- The host club for the second act of the Swiss J/70 Sailing League were not disappointed by the performance of their hometown team- SV Kreuzlingen.  From Friday to Sunday, the “bise” winds blew on the Bodensee Lake between Beaufort 1 to 5 and allowed the Super League teams to sail 42 races for the 12 participating teams from across Switzerland.

    The local Bodensee team took advantage of their local knowledge. Bringing home the victory and the series lead was the SV Kreuzlingen crew of Tom Rüegge, Stefan Stäheli, Peter Fritschi and Caroline Tanner-Keller.

    The second placed Regattaclub Bodensee (RCB) had a difficult start and was third after the first day. However, the crew found their rhythm and finished their last 7 races with all first and second places. With this amazing performance, the RCB team was able to overtake the Regattaclub Oberhofen (BE) in front of them and work their way up to the leading Kreuzlinger’s. However, the RCB team could never challenge the consistent sailing of SV Kreuzlingen.

    As a result of the weekend series, the SV Kreuzlingen team has now posted a lofty 1-1 for 2 pts in the series, with three events left for summer 2018.  Sitting in second is RC Bodensee with a 3-2 for 5 pts.  Third is Societe Nautique de Geneve with a 2-6 for 8 pts. They are tied with RC Oberhofen that has a 5-3 for 8 pts.  Then, in provisional fifth place is YC Bielersee with an 8-4 for 12 pts.

    The Swiss Sailing Clubs are international leaders in the Sailing Champions League. This year, the sporting level has risen again. The clubs send their best sailors into the regattas and the list of participants reads like a "Who's Who" of Swiss sailing. Olympians, World Champions, European Champions and Swiss Champions in various classes are at the start and want to win the Swiss Sailing League Cup and the Swiss Championship title for their club.  Sailing photo credits- Claudia Somm.  For more Swiss J/70 Sailing League information
     

    Fun J/Stop Regatta on San Francisco Bay!
    (San Francisco, CA)- San Francisco Bay gave sailors and race committee some of the usual course challenges, but the result was a great weekend of racing for the twenty-three J/105s that came out for the J/Stop Regatta. The regatta commenced on Saturday, May 5, with overcast skies and raw conditions that had sailors commenting on the cold by the end of four races. Fortunately, the sun broke through in time to warm up competitors during post-race beers on the docks.

    The wind cooperated early with westerlies building steadily to the mid-teens. Racing started with the tide just turning from ebb to flood and, as often happens with this very competitive fleet, the first start led to a general recall as most boats got to the line too early and were pushed over. From then on, Saturday’s races were started under the “U” flag rule and the fleet behaved much better. (Under this rule, a boat caught over the line any time after one minute before her start is disqualified, unless the race is restarted or resailed). To the sailors’ great credit, Sunday’s starts were all under the regular “P” flag, with no boats called over early.

    Wind was brisker on Sunday, reaching into the high teens. As veteran Bay racers know, the tide first turns close to shore, so in the early races there was a greater advantage in getting out to the middle of the Bay when going upwind to catch the last of the ebb tide heading out the Gate. To compensate, the race committee set a start line that initially favored the pin, making adjustments for each race as the flood set in across the whole Bay. It’s always a challenge to convince the sailors that the line is fair so they don’t all crowd one end, but it doesn’t always work, even if the math is done right. In race 6, for example, while the bulk of the fleet thought the committee boat end was the place to be, ARBITRAGE and MOJO came in from the pin end and port-tacked the whole fleet with room to spare. ARBITRAGE went on to win that race and took third overall in the regatta. 

    Many of the top competitors shuffled first-place finishes, and prizes were awarded for each, so several skippers took home some StFYC glassware, including SFYC’s Ryan Simmons on BLACKHAWK for races 1-2, and Tim Russell’s NE-NE in races 3 and 7. StFYC’s DONKEY JACK (skippered by Shannon Ryan and Rolf Kaiser), Walter Sanford’s ALCHEMY and Bruce Stone and Nicole Breault on ARBITRAGE finished first in races 4, 5 and 6, respectively.

    Winning their first event in quite some time was Ryan Simmons’ BLACKHAWK with a total of 18 pts.  Though StFYC’s Ian Charles’s MAVERICK didn’t take any firsts, they finished 2nd overall with 25 pts.  Third was Stone/Breault’s ARBITRAGE with 34 pts and rounding out the top five were Russell’s NE-NE and Jeff Litfin’s MOJO, in 4th and 5th, respectively.  For more J/105 J/STOP Regatta sailing information and results
     

    J/70 3 BIG DOGS Win Cinco de Mayo Regatta
    JADED Dominates J/24s
    (Santa Barbara, CA)- The annual Cinco de Mayo Regatta in Santa Barbara, CA is one of the all-time favorites for dinghy and one-design keelboats in the region.  The laid-back Sail Santa Barbara Sailing Club does a fantastic job hosting the event, making sure their party on Saturday evening is well-attended due to the copious amounts of delicious Mexican food and massive pitchers of Margaritas.

    The Sail SBSC RC and PRO crew managed to knock out seven races for the J/24s and eight races for the J/70 class.  The sailing conditions could not have been any better all weekend long, with Saturday’s winds ranging from 240 to 270 deg at 4-8 kts and Sunday’s sunny breezes also building midday from the west around 4-8 kts.

    Winning the J/70 class was Pat Toole’s 3 BIG DOGS crew with a remarkably consistent record of five 1sts and three 2nds to win with just 9 pts net.  Second was Scott Deardorff’s CAKE, winning the only two races the Big Doggers did not, finishing with 16 pts net.  Then, taking the third spot on the podium was Wolfe’s SHARK with 20 pts net.

    In a somewhat similar fashion as the 70s, it was Klatt’s J/24 team on JADED that simply dominated the J/24 fleet with all bullets to end up with just 6 pts net after discarding a 1st! Ouch! Almost taking all 2nds for the silver was Taylors USA 2223 with 12 pts net.  Rounding out the podium in the bronze slot was Nidzieko’s YOUNG FOOLS with 18 pts net.   For more Cinco de Mayo Regatta sailing information
     

    Mind-blowing Race To The Straits Doublehanded Race
    (Seattle, WA)- Every year, the amazingly laid back, fun-loving sailors that call the Sloop Tavern YC home in Ballard, WA hold their annual Race To The Straits Regatta. The format is simple, essentially a double-handed race from Seattle to Port Townsend and back. This year, 101 sailboats sailed in the 18 keelboat divisions.   Kurt Hoehne from Sailish.com had this to report on the racing.

    At what point will the other clubs take notice of what a fun race format this is? A rhetorical question based on the fact that the “RTTS” hit its limit of 125 boats several days before the race, and it’s no wonder. The atmosphere before, during and after the event is special. Let’s get to his question later. First, the race.

    The Leg North
    It was hard to find a frown in Port Townsend Saturday afternoon. The fleet had just spent 4-6 hours beating in 12-18 knots of breeze all the way from Seattle, with a boost from a strong ebb much of the way. The winners, of course, had something to smile about. But the staggered start (starting times reflecting each boat’s time allowance for the race) meant that the slow boat crews got to watch as much of the fast boats came thundering by.

    The winds were perfect for those non-overlapping headsail boats that could keep up the performance by flattening out the main and not change headsails (or have to sail with the wrong one up). Boats like MADRONA, the J/120 SHEARWATER and the J/105s all thrived. Boats with genoas were stuck changing down to #3s when the wind built and changing back up to #1s as the wind lightened up near the finish.  There was the usual puzzle of fitting everybody into Point Hudson, and nearly all the fleet fit.

    The Return Leg
    The race back to Seattle presented a different challenge – the beautiful northerly of Saturday teased the fleet with some great conditions that disappeared at times and the wonderful tides of the day before played havoc with the fleet, especially getting around the Double Bluff buoy.

    The orca J-pod (the enormous “killer whales”) made an appearance in Admiralty Inlet, presumably to help Dieter Creitz with his orca science project at school.

    The conditions meant a lot of gybes seeking out the right breeze while staying out of bad current. It took a toll on all these shorthanded crews, especially in the flying sails classes.

    That was a theme for much of the fleet on Sunday. Where few, if any, were expected to finish the full course, several did in a building southerly.

    The results show a familiar list of winners. But, the thing that is truly special about this race is how welcome everyone feels, even the skippers who aren’t the serious types and the boats that haven’t seen a new sail in 15 years. There were kids, dogs, dodgers, grills hanging off about half the rails, moms and pops, and live-aboards. There’s no doubt each and every one adjusted their expectations for the racing part and had a great time pursuing them.

    J/doublehanded crews sailed in a total of ELEVEN divisions! Holy smokes! That’s a LOT of most excellent race management work by the amazing volunteers at the “Sloop”.

    In Class 3, Dan Wierman’s J/35 took fourth.  Scott Galbraith’s J/24 FLYER nailed the silver in Class 5.

    Dennis Clark’s J/27 nearly led a clean sweep for J/Teams in Class 9.  Behind him in third was Leo Morales’ J/27 WIZARD.  Then, he was followed by John Sezer’s J/80 RECKLESS in 4th, Ulf Georg Gwildis’ J/30 gorgeous blue IMPULSIVE in 5th, David Schutte’s J/80 TAJ MAHAL in 6th and Lek Dimarucot’s J/80 UNDERDOG in 7th.

    Class 10 was lucky that Christine Nelson’s J/20 SLICK had a DNF on Sunday, taking 2nd as a result.  David Jade’s pretty J/35c SHADOWFAX placed 6th.

    The J/105s had a fantastic time sailing doublehanded.  Probably the perfect boat for a couple to sail in this type of event.  With enough room to swing a cat down below, and have some fun racing, while not being overwhelmed in the sail-handling department.  Winning was Vince Townrow’s KINETIC, followed in second by John & Leslie Aitchison’s MOOSE UNKNOWN, and Jim Geros’ LAST TANGO in third.

    Tad Fairbank’s pretty J/100 SELAH was fourth in Class 13.

    The J/109s just about led a J/team clean sweep of Class 14. Winning was Kirk Fraser’s J/109 ECLIPSE, Reed Bernhard’s J/109 MOUNTAIN was second, Tolga Cezik’s J/109 LODOS took 4th, Stu Burnell’s J/109 TANTIVY placed 5th, Bill Harter’s J/37C was 6th, and Tyson Varosyan’s J/35 was 7th.  Amazing performance and kudos to all!

    Crushing their Class 15 was Chris & Justin Wolfe’s J/120 SHEARWATER, winning by over an hour on combined corrected times for both Saturday and Sunday!  Jim Fletcher & Dana Clark’s J/46 BEAUTY rounded out the podium in third place just 5 minutes off second place!

    Andy Mack’s J/122 GRACE smoked their Class 17 division of mostly high-performance boats (e.g. Melges 32, Aerodyne 38, 1D35, etc).  Similarly, John Tenneson’s J/145 JEDI in the “big boat” division took the bronze in their high-flying fleet behind World Champions like Carl Buchan in Class 18.

    In the Doublehanded Overall Division, the Wolfe’s J/120 SHEARWATER took 3rd, Tenneson’s J/145 JEDI 3rd place, Fraser’s J/109 ECLIPSE 6th, Mack’s J/122 GRACE 7th, Townrow’s J/105 KINETIC 9th, the Aitchison’s J/105 MOOSE UNKNOWN 11th.  So, SIX of the top ELEVEN boats overall- not a bad outing for fellow J/sailors!

    In the “Jack & Jill” division comprised of guy/girl teams, it was the Wolfe’s J/120 SHEARWATER that took 2nd place to the world-famous Carl & Carol Buchan.  Then, the Kristen’s J/105 MORE JUBILEE took 4th.  Fletcher & Clark on the J/46 BEAUTY were 6th. And, the Mack’s J/122 GRACE was 7th. Again, 4 of the top 7 is indicative of how easy to sail and handle the J/designs are for male/female teams across the spectrum of weather conditions, both upwind and downwind!

    Amazingly, the Sloop Tavern YC had established enough of a following/ reputation in social media that none other than Thomas Cook Travels online media magazine “Holiday” from the United Kingdom felt their quirky, fun-loving approach to sailing and the world was worthy of an “Into the Blue” feature article (by fellow U.K. sailors, of course!).   Read on here in this PDF download- Thomas Cook Travels "Into The Blue" article- fun reading!   Sailing photo credits- Jan Anderson   For more Race to the Straits sailing information
     

    Thrilling Finales @ American YC Spring Series
    (Rye, NY)- The final weekend of the American YC Spring Series was full of “comeback kids” stories.  However, the flipside of that scenario, were the anxiety-ridden tactics and strategies of many boats to try to maintain control and position on the racetrack without falling further behind!

    This past Saturday, sailors aimed to pick up where they had left off. However, the weather had other plans. With very little wind on both courses, sailors were forced to wait for breeze throughout the day.

    In total, the East Course was only able to get one race in. In the J/44 division, Bill Ketcham’s MAXINE battled it out with Chris Lewis’ KENAI. In the end, KENAI won the only race of the day by one point as MAXINE finished second.

    The South Course managed to get two races in by shortening the last race.  Trevor Roach’s J/70 SEMI-CHARMED bounced back from a rough finish to last weekend by placing first and second in the two races.

    In the J/105 division, LOU LOU held on to its lead, winning both races; making it four race wins in a row.

    Bengt & Marie Johansson’s ZIG ZAG and Carl Olsson’s MORNING GLORY maintained control of first and second place, respectively, with two points separating them in the J/109 division.

    After racing, sailors were treated to a special presentation in the American Yacht Club ballroom by Tucker Thompson, who was the official host of the 35th America's Cup. Tucker gave a unique behind the scenes look at the competition for the 35th America's Cup held in Bermuda. His presentation included stories, analysis, and a look at the rich history of the America's Cup. Tucker also gave the attendees a sneak peek at the 36th America's Cup in New Zealand. On a day that also celebrated Cinco de Mayo and the Kentucky Derby, it's safe to say Saturday had plenty of fun for sailors both on and off the water.

    Sunday morning brought overcast skies as competitors returned to AYC for the final day of racing.

    On the East Course, the J/44 MAXINE sustained its solid performance throughout both weekends to win the J/44 class. By winning three of the last four races, Lewis’ KENAI rocketed into a solid second place.  Third was Don & Dick Rave’s RESOLUTE.  Fourth and fifth, respectively, were Len Sitar’s VAMP and Tom Blackwell’s BREAKAWAY.

    On the South Course, the battle in the J/70 division continued, where first place was anyone's for the taking. Roach’s SEMI-CHARMED persevered to win the division with Daniel Goldberg's BAZINGA right behind finishing second. Both boats had quite the comeback considering at the end last week SEMI-CHARMED was second in the division and BAZINGA was fifth.  Third was Alex Meleny’s TRUCKIN, fourth Carrie & Ed Austin’s CHINOOK, fifth Mike Gavin’s USA 202.

    With thirteen boats, the J/105 class was the largest fleet in this year's regatta. Paul Beaudin's LOU LOU was no stranger to the competition, as it took first place for the fourth year in a row. Trailing right behind in second place was the YOUNG AMERICAN SAILING ACADEMY helmed by Maddy Ploch. This junior team boasted a crew of sailors mostly under the ages of 18. Third was Harald Edegran/ Jeremy Henderson’s CONUNDRUM.  Rounding out the top five was Thom Hering’s TRIFECTA and George Wilbanks’ REVELATION in 4th and 5th, respectively.

    In the J/88 division, Elizabeth and Matt Barry’s ESCAPE finished first, with Mike Bruno’s WINGS finishing second. Perhaps the most surprising performance was the extreme contrast of results from the first weekend to the second by Justin Scagnelli’s ALBONDIGAS.  Sitting in fifth after round one, the screamed back into contention and leapt onto the podium after posting a 1-1-1-2 tally to finish only 4 points in arrears of second!  Iris Vogel’s DEVIATION dropped back into 4th, while Paul Strauch’s ANDIAMO/ JAZZ sailed steadily to take 5th in their first outing in the 88 class.

    Over the course of both weekends, the J/109 division was hotly contested. Though neck and neck, ZIG ZAG pulled through to win the division. MORNING GLORY placed second just one point behind. Then, in an eerily similar fashion to their 88 colleagues on ALBONDIGAS, Adrian Begley’s MAD DOGS & ENGLISHMEN truly went mad, mad, mad round and round the track and finished with all bullets in their last five races! As a result, they took the bronze after a less than stellar outing the previous weekend.

    In the ORR division, Neil Hindle's J/145 MUSKOKA won not only the division but also the only distance race of the regatta.  For more American YC Spring Series sailing information
     

    J/Community
    What friends, alumni, and crew of J/Boats are doing worldwide
    -----------
    * Family sailing on J/70s off St Petersburg? Yes, of course. The perfect “youth trainer” and “family day sailor!”

    Matt Braun and his family have been participating in the “Twilight Series” at St Petersburg Yacht Club in one of the club’s J/70’s.

    Commenting on their family outing, Matt said, “I believe we had 5 boats that evening.  Generally, we have between 5-7 J/70 club boats.  The StPYC Youth Team makes it a regular training date, as do many local sailors.

    On the day of this picture, my 10-year-old daughter Ainsley was at the helm from beginning to end.  It was a warm 10-12 knots breeze with the beautiful St. Pete skyline as a backdrop.

    We sailed a 3 1/2 mile windward-leeward course, finishing a close 3rd behind 2 boats sailed by very talented crews.

    Our effort was truly a family affair. My son Guthrie trimmed jib and helped with tactics. My wife (Ann Lisa) flew the kite and did pit.  I was mostly ballast and trimmed main.  All and all, we had a great time.  Hopefully, the boats we beat were not too embarrassed to be bested by a 5th grader!!”
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  • Pacific Cup Starts in Big Breeze

    Pacific Cup Starts in Big Breeze (San Francisco, CA)- Fresh winds, reported by weather authorities assustained in the high 20s on the beam made for a demanding first nightfor the 29 original starters of the Pacific Cup to Hawaii- a.k.a. the“fun race to Hawaii”! Race veterans compare last night’s conditions tothe 2002 and 2016 races that were marked by unusually stiff breezes.

    Following the four starts on Tuesday, there are 30 more teams that willget underway during the three more additional start days on July 11th,12th, and 13th.

    Inthe DH2 Mount Gay Rum doublehanded division, Sean and Kim Mulvihill ontheir J/120 JAMANI are certainly on the right horse for the course inthe early stages of this race, with their J/120 effectively leading thedoublehanded division. The J/105 ABSTRACT sailed by Doug Pihlaja andMary Hartel is not that far beyond, loving the heavy reaching conditionsas well.

    There are J/crews in three more classes that will be starting soon. PHRF Class B (Weems & Plath) has Karl Haflinger’s J/35 SHEARWATERracing with his crew of Jim Ianelli (Navigator), Stewart Putnam, DavidSmullin, and Alan Johnson.

    PHRF Class C (Alaska Airlines) has Phil Wampold’s J/92 ZAFF racing withhis Canadian crew of Kieran Horsburgh (Watch Captain), Ansel Koehn(Foredeck), and Paul Mais (Navigator).

    And, ORR Class D (Pasha Hawaiian) has Tracy Rogers’ J/120 HOKULANIsailing with his crew of John Dillow (Navigator), Cris Sena, and MikeMahoney.   Follow them all on the YB Tracker here  And, follow the news on the Pacific Cup Facebook page here.  For more Pacific Cup Race sailing informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • Vic-Maui Race Underway

    Vic-Maui Race Underway J/122E JOYRIDE Amongst The Leaders!
    (Victoria, British Columbia, Canada)- The Victoria to Maui InternationalYacht Race, hosted by the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club and the LahainaYacht Club, got underway July 1st. The 2,308nm course goes fromVictoria, British Columbia to Maui, Hawaii.

    The lone J/Crew sailing the race is the gorgeous J/122E JOYRIDE fromSeattle, WA skippered by her owner- John Murkowski. They are one of themost successful offshore racing teams in the Pacific Northwest. Here arethe latest updates below.

    Day 5
    Day 5 Roll Call finds the boats generally about 550 miles west of theOregon/California border and the leaders are now about 1500 miles fromHawaii. But the winds are easing. This is definitely the Middle Sea andthe most difficult part of the race to figure out. The fleet continuesto chase the sweet spot between the Pacific High and Low Pressure troughwell west of the Rhumb Line; with most boats 75 miles west of thedirect route and Anjo and Serenite another 75 miles west of that.

    The wind was generally strong overnight after the trough passed and mostboats were beam-reaching speeds of 8 kts or more. But the wind has nowabated with most boats seeing wind from the NW about 15 kts, and speedshave slowed accordingly. JOY RIDE is still vying for the lead for linehonors, while winning on handicap.

    Day 6
    Day 6 Roll Call finds the fleet well offshore and now about 750 milesoff Cape Mendocino and still sailing west of the direct route to Maui. But this morning’s Weather Eye lays out the myriad of issues facing thefleet as all boats look to pick the right weather route, with choosingthe wrong window likely to be costly.

    Boats are reporting sailing in lighter conditions that yesterday. But,more importantly, the “Tuna Challenge” was issued yesterday by Oxomoxo,and it was answered on JOY RIDE within minutes of putting out the lure.No word on how bloody the decks got. Also, reporting tuna on board areTurnagain and Kraken again.

    Day 7
    This afternoon, the fleet looks to be sailing on starboard tack withW-NW winds in the 7-13 knot range.  Barometric pressures reportedlyrange from 1022 – 1025, with some dubious outlier readings from boatswhose barometer calibrations may have fallen off the pre-start joblist.  All the boats appear to be navigating a fine line to avoid lightair on their left (to the East) and to stay in pressure either ahead orto their right, on the slope of the High (to the West).

    Conditions onboard the boats are reported as warmer and drier, with amore-than-faint whiff of tuna on some boats and gray whales near otherboats.  It looks like tomorrow will be the half way mark for a number ofboats; traditionally there are some wild and wacky celebrations thatare sometimes akin to a sailor’s traditional equatorial crossing.  Withthe magic of modern wireless communications, photographs, includingdrone images, and stories have been coming ashore from the boats andappearing on blogs and social media including the Vic-Maui Facebookgroup at www.facebook.com/vmiyr/

    Day 8
    Most of the fleet reached the halfway point in last 24 hours, or willshortly. It is certainly a time for celebrations aboard (and perhaps thefirst shower in a week). But it is also time to contemplate how far theboats are from anything - nearest land is over 1000 miles away. Butfrom now on, the nearest land will be Hawaii – how good is that?

    The weather seems to have improved and with boats now at the latitude ofCarmel, it is certainly warmer and most boats report that the fouliesare finally starting to come off. There are some complaints about thelack of spinnaker sailing (as promised in the brochure) with boatsreporting they are close reaching with Code 0 sails in 10-15 kts ofwind. And they could use more wind.

    The trade winds and the promised spinnaker run to Hawaii are out there,but there is still a zone of changeable winds ahead that needs to benavigated. This race to Maui will be determined by who gets to thosetrade winds and hoist the spinnaker first.

    Day 9
    The trade wind run under spinnaker to Hawaii beckons, but morechangeable winds are still in the way of the Vic-Maui fleet. The boatsare stuck in a form of purgatory close reaching in wind speeds arefluctuating from non-existent to 12 kts – not exactly prime conditionsfor an ocean race. And the boats are soooo tired of seeing the whitesails hoisted on a perpetual starboard tack and are getting frustratedby the time it is taking to make southing to the trade wind latitudes.And they are getting nervous, as everyone has now figured out that theboat that finds the right path to the trades will likely win the race.

    And they are now clearly in the North Pacific Gyre (aka the GarbagePatch) with JOY RIDE quite surprised by the amount of plastic garbagefloating by. With Salient also report seeing lots of whales, you have towonder how our leviathan friends are faring in a sea of fish nets,plastic cups and other urban detritus.  And, JOY RIDE is about 923nmaway from Hawaii.

    Day 10
    Day 10 finds the boats doing everything to eek out a mile and get closerto the promised trade winds. At one time this morning, the threeleading boats were all pointed to Baja, doing 1 kt with an ETA sometimenext year! LOL!

    As the Weather Eye said this morning, "the cookie will crumble based on hard work, skill, and luck".   Follow the Vic-Maui Race here on Facebook  Watch “live” real-time YB Tracker of the fleet here   For more Vic-Maui Offshore Race sailing informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • NYYC Race Week Preview

    NYYC Race Week Preview (Newport, RI)- The New York YC Race Week will be taking place from July16th to 21st, 2018 on the waters of Narragansett Bay and Rhode IslandSound for a fleet of thirty-five modern keelboats, of which eleven (33%of the fleet) are J’s. The J/109s will be sailing as a one-design classand the other J/crews will be participating in the IRC and PHRFNavigator classes.

    The half-dozen boat J/109 class includes some of the best East Coastboats on the summer regatta circuits.  Those teams include AlbrechtGoethe’s HAMBURG from Lakewood YC, Ted Herlihy’s GUT FEELING from NewBedford YC, Tom Sutton’s LEADING EDGE from Lakewood YC, Bill Sweetser’sRUSH from Annapolis YC, and Bill Kneller’s VOLARE from Coasters HarborNavy YC.

    In the twenty-one boat IRC Class, sailing offshore will be Sedgwick& Andrew Ward’s J/111 BRAVO from Shelter Island YC, Paul Milo’sJ/122 ORION, and NYYC Vice Commodore Bill Ketcham’s J/44 MAXINE.

    Sailing in the PHRF Navigator class will be Tom Wacker’s J/105 TRADING PLACES from Old Cove YC in Brooklyn, New York.  For more New York YC Race Week sailing informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • Bayview-Mackinac Race Preview

    Bayview-Mackinac Race Preview (Port Huron, MI)- One hundred ninety teams are confirmed for the 2018Bell’s Beer Bayview Mackinac Race, scheduled for July 14.  With 93 yearsof tradition behind it, this unique distance race, with two courses(204 or 259 nm) that start on lower Lake Huron and finish at MackinacIsland, has a knack for bringing back regulars and reeling in newcomers,each year weaving new interesting stories into its tapestry of racingfun.  One of the largest brand contingents happens to be J/sailors fromacross the Great Lakes- thirty-three crews in total.

    Division I- Cove Island Course
    Not surprisingly, one entire class of thirteen-boats is comprised of allJ/Teams- Class D that has only J/111s and J/120s.  The four J/111s areCAPERS (Don Hudak), FREEDOM (Jim Cooper), SHMOKIN JOE (Jeff Schaefer),and UNPLUGGED (Tim Clayson).  There are nine J/120s that will bebattling for class honors as well; including Charlie Hess’ FUNTECHRACING, Mike & Bob Kirkman’s HOT TICKET, the trio on J-HAWKER (DaveSandlin, Ken Brown, Mark Pikula), and Henry Mistele’s NIGHT MOVES.

    Sailing in the eleven-boat Class E are seven J/Teams, including MattSchaedler’s J/122 BLITZKRIEG, Jim Murray’s CALLISTO, Bill Hamilton’sJ/109 PHOENIX, and four J/105s (Mark Denuyl’s GOOD LOOKIN, Mark Symonds’PTERODACTYL, Matt Haglund’s RAMPAGE, & Jim Murphy’s WINDSHADOW).

    Thedozen-boat Class G is considered the “Level 35” class with ten J/35sheaded to the starting line and their North American Championship twoweeks later!  Those teams include Bill Wildner’s MR BILL’S WILD RIDE (ofcourse!), Tim & Amie Ross’ BLACKHAWK, Ed & John Bayer’s FALCON,and Greg Whipple’s WHIPLASH.

    The Class I Cruising fleet includes Gary Gonzalez’s J/42 DOS MAS and the J/35 DYNOMYTE skippered by Gary Warner.

    Division II- Shore Course
    Sailing in the fourteen-boat Class M fleet will be a previous classwinner, the infamous J/34 IOR classic called KNEE DEEP and sailed byBrett & Katie Langolf from Deadman’s Flat YC.  For more Belles Beer Bayview Mackinac Race sailing information
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  • Women Sailors Empowered Offshore Sailing!

    Women Sailors Empowered Offshore Sailing! (Cleveland, OH)- Katie Langolf led the effort to assemble an all Mother-Daughter Crewfor the Cleveland Race Week Women's Regatta aboard the J/34 IOR KNEEDEEP.

    Four Moms, five daughters (ages 8-13), and their coach raced an offshorecourse with plenty of laughs and maybe a glass of wine after!

    Cheers Ladies! Add to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • Dutch J/105 Leads Doublehanded Spanish Race!

    Dutch J/105 Leads Doublehanded Spanish Race! (L'Escala, Spain)- Hans Mulder, the Dutch owner of the J/105 WINDSHEAR, recently sailed a 35.0nm doublehanded race in L’Escala Spain. Here is the report from Hans and the Club Nautic L’Escala.

    “The J/105 WINDSHEAR from Club de Vela Golfus is the winner of the IXCommodore’s Cup- Jotun Grand Prix, that brought together a total of 20doublehanded racers to the starting line. The long distance regattabegan at 1105 hrs and was the second sporting event in the calendar ofactivities that the Club Nàutic L'Escala has prepared to celebrate its50th anniversary.

    TheDutchman sailing the J/105 WINDSHEAR- Hans Peter Mulder- took theabsolute class and overall victory after being one of the few boats thatmanaged to finish the race in the established time. The northeast wind,between four and eight knots at the start, began to diminish when thefleet began to reach Messina Island.  As a result, many boats did notfinish within the time limit for the race.

    WINDSHEAR was also the first boat to arrive at 22:37:36 hours afterracing for a total of 11 hours, 32 minutes and 36 seconds to completethe 35.5nm course. With departure from L'Escala, the route made thefleet navigate to a virtual buoy, the Medes Islands, and the island ofMessina before returning to the starting point.” Add to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • J/80 World Champs Update

    J/80 World Champs Update Spanish Dominate Podium So Far
    (Les Sables d’Olonne, France)- The Sports Nautiques Sablais YC ishosting the J/80 World Championship from the 9th to the 13th July.  Sofar, they’ve been blessed with good sailing conditions on the bay forthe seventy-boat fleet.

    As anticipated, the J/80 World Championship has turned into a full-onbattle between the top French and Spanish teams at the top of theleaderboard.

    Afterthree days of sailing with eight races completed, occupying the topthree spots on the podium are Spanish teams- Iker Almondoz’s GARATU,Rayco Tabares’ HOTEL PRINCESS YAIZA, and Juan Luis Paez’s PUENTE ROMANOMARBELLA.  The top French teams are sitting in 4th- Simon Moriceau’sARMEN HABITAT, 6th- Sylvain Pellisier’s INTUITIVE SAILS, 7th- VianneyGuilbaud’s AG+ SPARS, and 9th- Gwendal Nael’s EJP 10.  The top Russianteam is Alexei Semenov’s NEW TERRITORIES in 5th place.  PatrickO’Neill’s Irish crew on MOJO are 8th.  And, rounding out the top ten isthe Spanish crew of Javier Chacartegui’s IBO.ES.  The top British boatis Jon Powell’s BETTY in 11th position.

    Two French women skippers are in the top 15- Anne Phelipon’sNAVIGATLANTQUE in 12th and Maxime Rousseaux’s CN ST CAST GRAND OUESTETIQUETTES in 13th- just three points separate them.   Follow the J/80 World Championships on Facebook here.   For more J/80 World Championship sailing informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • APCC Voiles Sportive Top French J/80 Sailing League

    APCC Voiles Sportive Top French J/80 Sailing League Moriceau’s Team The Best in Brest Big Time!
    (Brest, France)- Eighteen sailing club teams from across Franceparticipated in the first of three events in the 2018 French NationalSailing League, supported by the F.I.V. (French National SailingFederation).  The first regatta was hosted by USAM Brest, the next in LaRochelle by Societe Regate La Rochelle, and the third the SAILINGChampions League qualifier in St. Petersburg, Russia from August 3rd to6th.

    Of the eighteen sailing clubs from across France, the three principalBrest clubs were participating- Societe Regate Brest, Crocs L'Elorn andUSAM Brest.  Five teams were from Normandy- Club Voiles Saint Aubin-Elbeuf, YC Granville, YC Cherbourg, and the two Le Havre clubs- SocieteRegate Le Havre and the Societe Nautique Pointe Le Havre. Interestingly, five of the clubs are from the inland lakes, such as ClubVoiles Saint Aubin-Elbeuf.

    Day 1- Friday
    It was around 12:30pm that the first race was launched under thebeautiful sun off Brest. Picture perfect conditions awaited the eighteencrews in the northeasterly winds of more than 10 knots.

    With a great big blue sky, the theme for the day could have been“Tropical Brest sailing” for the entire day. Twelve races were sailed,divided into four “flights”, each of the crews sailed four races.

    Lastyear, both sailing clubs from Le Havre (SNPH and the SRH) ended up tiedat the end of the sailing league series, with NHP finishing in fourthplace ahead of their rival club. This year, nothing has changed exceptthe regatta location! Even far from their homeport, the two Le Havreclubs put on a good show and this time it was the crew of the SRH thattook the lead with an amazing 1-2-1-2! Incredibly, behind them it wasthree-way tie on 7 pts each for second place between APCC VoilesSportive Nantes (1-1-2-3), CV St Aubin- Elbeuf (2-2-1-2), and SNP LeHavre (1-1-3-2).

    The Daily ”SAP" Statistic
    121 meters. That was the distance where APCC Voile Sportive- Nantes teambeat their closest opponent to the finish of the second flight ofFlight 1. A considerable difference, when we know that the courses arerather short! Clearly, the people of Nantes are in Brest to get the win!

    The Tactical Maneuver of the Day
    That award goes to the young crew of YC Mauguio Carnon. Despite theirfatigue, they arrived at 5am in Brest after more than 10 hours ofdriving on Friday to get to Brest! And, lack of experience in the J/80,the southerners made their talent speak for themselves, especiallyduring a very nice maneuver during the 2nd race of the 1st Flight.

    5th at the 1st mark, the crew of YC Mauguio Carnon managed to "slipunder the buoy" to take the inside and pass three competitors. Then, bymanaging to slide below them on the starboard gybe, they managed toprevent them from being able to gybe as leeward boat. Holding them pastthe layline to the leeward mark gates, they gybed first and forced theiropponents to gybe after them and, thus, to line up behind them. As aresult, they took 2nd in the race!

    Day 2- Saturday
    After an idyllic first day with perfect conditions in the Brest Bay, the18 teams were back on the race track for another day of near perfectsailing conditions.  The goal was six races for each team!

    At the end of the day, a big sun and a gorgeous northeasterly windbetween 10 and 15 knots permitted the six races per team and a total of18 races!

    In the lead after the first day, the SRH's Le Havre fell behind on therankings. On the contrary, their rivals at CV Saint-Aubin Elbeuf had ahot start with three bullets in three races!

    Last night's arrival of Pauline Courtois, just off her podium at theFinnish WIM Series stage, was good for the CVSAE crew! But, despite thisperfect morning, the CVSAE has the same number of points as APCC VoileSportive.

    Total suspense at the top of the rankings! The SNPH from Le Havre justone small point behind the leading duo, and just two points ahead of thecrew from CV Saint-Quentin.

    The Daily ”SAP" Statistic
    31 seconds. During Flight 8 Race 2 was particularly tight. The 6 boatsarrived almost at the same time and only 31 seconds separated thewinner, the APCC Voile Sportive de Nantes, the 6th, USAM Brest. Forcomparison, during the same Flight, in the other 2 races, the gapsbetween the 1st and the 2nd were 51 and 52 seconds!

    The Tactical Maneuver of the Day
    Flight 5, race 1. In regattas, it is often said that a good start is 50% of the job done.

    The crew of CV Saint Aubin Elbeuf was able to prove it in the first raceof the day. At 50 seconds before the start, the positioning of theboats suggested that the line was favorable to the right. At 30 secondsfrom the start, the CVSAE luffs to slow down, and not to arrive tooearly on the line. This maneuver forces the boat of the CV Saint-Quentinto luff too to not be penalized (the leeward boat being a priority overthe windward one).

    By a sort of "domino effect”, the crew of SR Brest is obliged to luff,too, and must wait for the boats to sink downwind. Priority, istherefore, the CVSAE that can afford to "trigger" its maneuver at theappropriate time. This is what the crew does 5 seconds before the start.They leave with more speed than the others and with two competitors intheir backwind. A high-class departure!

    Day 3- Sunday
    The third and final day of competition started off with a postponement on another beautiful day, but no wind!

    Sitting ashore, here was an interview with regatta leaders- Edouard Champault (APCC Voile Sportive - Nantes):

    What was your feeling about yesterday's conditions?

    EC: Good races yesterday with still very good conditions. A little lesswind than the first day, but the sun and no rain was great. It is verysatisfying for us to be in the lead overall. The wind was there, too, soit was perfect!

    How do you approach the last day of racing today?

    EC: Today, it's much softer in the wind, so we'll see. Otherwise, noparticular strategies.  The goal being to finish in front of as much aspossible and look for the points!

    Likethe previous two days, the sun showed brightly in the morning. But, thewind was again a “no show”- a complete “glass out” across the bay.

    However, by 12:15pm a light breeze blew into the Brest Bay and allowedthe Race Committee to launch two more flights and a total of six races.

    In the light airs, the Nantais team from APCC Voile Sportive, led bySimon Moriceau and Pierre-Loïc Berthet, worked miracles and benefitedfrom a poor performance by the crew of the CVSAE during Flight 11 (3rdplace) to take the lead in the overall standings before the last race ofthe weekend.

    It was a happy coincidence that both boats were in the same race duringthe 12th and final flight, which obviously gave a superb show on thewater!

    The Normans tried "to get" their rivals in the starting procedure (see"The Maneuver of the Day below), but the Nantes managed to get off thestart, win the last race and first place overall!

    Asa result of this regatta, APCC Voile Sportive Nantes and CV StAubin-Eleuf have qualified for the SAILING Champions League Finale in inSt. Moritz, Switzerland. In addition, SNPH (Le Havre) and the CVSQ(Saint-Quentin en Yvelines) have qualified for the second semifinal ofthe SAILING Champions League, scheduled from 3 to 6 August in St.Petersburg, Russia.  If these two teams finish 1st and 2nd, they alsoqualify to go sail the SCL Championship in St. Moritz, Switzerland! “Vive La France”!

    The Tactical Maneuver of the Day
    Last Flight, Race 1. The most anticipated race of the weekend. One ofthe few battles between the two regatta leaders and, most importantly,making for a dramatic finish to the regatta!

    Sitting just two points back in second place, the Normans of the CVSAEknew they had to put one or two boats between them and their rivals- theNantais of APCC Voile Sportive.

    Their goal was to “destroy” the start of their opponents. At 1:30 fromthe start, the CVSAE were “hunting” the APCC and made a 180 turn to putthemselves in front of their bow. Cédric Château, the CVSAE helmsman,then managed to pass under his opponent, who then found himself in adelicate position, because the Normans then have the opportunity to“close the door” by putting their bow next to the stern of the RC boat.The APCC must wait until the Normans bear-off to start their race. But,just as Cédric Château turns to cut speed and cut-off APCC at the line,two other boats are battling in the immediate vicinity of the RC boat!He found himself obliged to pass under these boats. The APCC used thatopportunity to slip through a mouse hole near the RC boat and to jumpacross the starting line at the gun and enjoyed a clear air start! Luck?  Skill?  Perhaps.   At the first crossing between the two boats,it was the Nantes APCC team that had the advantage and who, in turn,"scored” a direct attack on their opponent, tacking on top of them withno escape! Real match-racing!

    Not surprisingly, the winning team included a French J/80 Championsailor as its skipper- Simon Moriceau.  His team members for APCC VoileSportive were Simon Bertheau, Paul Medinger, and Pierre-loic Berthet.   Watch the French J/80 Sailing League video highlights on Facebook here.   Follow the French J/80 Sailing League on Facebook here.   For more French J/80 Sailing League informationAdd to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • Youth Sailing Programs- Ways to Fix Them

    Youth Sailing Programs- Ways to Fix Them Many Youth Sailing Programs are Failing, but there are Ways to Fix Them

    There is no doubt that competitive pressure on kids is resulting in thedecline of sailing in some youth sailing programs.  However, this trendcan be reversed.

    Twenty years ago, our club established a sailing camp.  In the earlyyears, we had about ten kids, but sixteen years later, we hit a peak of92 with ten on the waiting list.  This was about 10% of all theschool-aged children in town.

    We supplement our racing program with a set of skill-building games.

    By far the most popular game is “pirates”.  The kids are divided intoteams of five - a merchant captain, two coastguardsmen, and twopirates.  The activity is so popular that we tell the kids they cannotplay it until they sail expertly, which usually happens about the middleof the summer.

    The second most-liked game is “sailing Frisbee”.  It uses a start/finishline, a race course and Frisbee or aerobie for each team.  A boatcannot tack while in possession of her Frisbee.  The Frisbee must goaround the course, no shortcuts!

    Nextis “sail-ball”, a field/team sport for sailors, like football,lacrosse, soccer, etc.  There are two goals and two teams.   Likesoccer, play is continuous, with teams throwing the ball to each otherto get it in the goal (usually a floating water polo net).  Within thethree-boat length circle around the goal, defense has the right of way,otherwise racing rules apply.

    “Cheaters race” is always a winner on light days.  Setup a small racecourse- about 100 yards.  Ooching, pumping, skulling, etc., are allallowed.  Even swimming!

    We invented more than fifty games and add more each year.  Most games are fun, competitive, but low pressure.

    In addition, to having a good time all summer, some youngsters become local regatta champions.

    So take heart, there are ways to get kids passionate about our sport.  And, ours is not the only approach.”

    Videos of some games can be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/user/JayEveleth.  And for written rules, visit http://kittihawk20.squarespace.com.  Thanks for this wonderful contribution from Jay Eveleth and Scuttlebutt USA. Add to Flipboard Magazine.

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  • SANTANDER Wins Tiebreaker @ Algarrobo

    SANTANDER Wins Tiebreaker @ Algarrobo WINDMADE Crowned Chilean J/70 Autumn Circuit Champion
    (Algarrobo, Chile)- In the last weekend of June, six races were sailedfor the Autumn Championship, hosted by Cofradía Náutica Algarrobo, offthe Pacific Coast of Chile.

    Seventeen J/70 showed up at the starting line, thanks to the delay ofthe incoming winter and the lack of snow in the Andes Mountains skiresorts. It is true, many J/70 sailors are also snow skiing fans but thefun-in-the-sun on the ocean was far more appealing!

    As the sun rays dawned over the snow-capped peaks of the Andes mountainsto the east on Saturday morning, it was clear the wind was a “no show”for the first part of the day, leading to a postponement until the earlyafternoon.  Nevertheless, a cold and nice breeze from the west startedblowing around 2:30pm.  Three races were sailed with winds ranging from10 to 13 knots.  It could have been a cold winter day of sailing, butthe nice winter sun and the tight racing made the atmosphere warmer thanexpected.

    From the beginning, the battle between Pablo Amunategui’s SANTANDER andJuan Reid’s WINDMADE started in the first race. In the first beet,WINDMADE (J/70 hull #001) managed to get in front after SANTANDER tried(and failed) to do lee bow getting to the 1st weather mark. On the 2ndbeat, SANTANDER chose the left, tacking immediately after rounding theleeward gate.  A good left line of breeze gave them the advantage on thesecond windward leg. The final result of the 1st race- 1st SANTANDERand 2nd WINDMADE.  In short, that was the summary of the close racingbetween these two boats all weekend.

    The conditions for sailing were very nice.  In general, the left side isfavored in the westerly winds, but that was not the case this weekend. As a result, the fleet could spread out and play windshifts and breezelines across the race course.

    Thesecond race of the day was a lot more complicated for SANTANDER,finishing 13th while WINDMADE finished 5th.  First was Pedro Cabezón(Corinthians and very new skipper in the class!!) and second, again, wasDiego Gonzalez’s SENSEI.

    For the third race of the day, Reid’s WINDMADE won handily, followedCristobal Molina’s LEXUS in second and Matias Seguel’s VOLVO in third. The day closed with WINDMADE leading, followed by SENSEI in second andVOLVO in third place.

    The weather forecast for Sunday was complicated, some rain during themorning, but the day continued to get better than expected. The breezestart blowing from the north at 8-12 kts, with tricky, choppy seas(north seas comes directly from offshore) and that made for achallenging race course with difference in pressure and direction.  Theseas were very difficult to steer on starboard tack, as you were goingperpendicular to the wave train!

    It was close racing all day long Sunday. Pablo Amunategui & RodrigoGuzman’s SANTANDER sailed clean, posting a 1-3-2. With three greatstarts and perfect tactics/ strategy, they deserved their excellentresults.

    Meanwhile, WINDMADE struggled a bit on the last day, with finishes of7-1-3.  In fact, in the last race, Reid’s WINDMADE had a bad start andmade an amazing recovery (thanks to great tactics from RodrigoAmunátegui) to get the third place.

    Withsix races, one discard race came into play.  On total points, WINDMADEwon, but with discards, both WINDMADE and SANTANDER were tied withidentical records of 1-1-2-3-5 at 12 pts each.  Amazing! Shocking! Inany event, “c’est la vie, c’est la guerre”!  It came down to“who-beat-who” in the last race, tipping that advantage to SANTANDERover WINDMADE. Rounding out the podium was Diego Gonzalez’s SENSIE with14 pts- the most consistent boat in the regatta, throwing out a 5thplace and on straight points/ no throw-outs had won the regatta!  Tightracing to say the least for this trio.  The balance of the top fiveincluded Seguel’s VOLVO in 4th and Andres Ducasse’s TSUNAMI in 5thposition.

    In the Corinthians division, there was just about a three-way tie forfirst!  Two cousins, and both Lightning skippers, Cristóbal Pérez onTRILOGIA and Francisco Pérez on ELEANOR RYGBY, both finished with 46pts! That tiebreaker went in favor of TRILOGIA.  Just one point backwith 47 pts was Paolo Molina’s ALBATROSS.

    After the Algarrobo event, the eighteen-race Chilean J/70 Autumn seriesconcluded, with two discards permitted for overall results.  Crowned aschampion was Juan Reid’s WINDMADE with 49 pts total. The silver went toAndres Ducasse’s TSUNAMI with 62 pts and the bronze to PabloAmunategui’s SANTANDER with 67 pts.

    In the Corinthians Division, winning the Autumn Series was PabloCisternas’ UROBORO with 153 pts. Second was José Antonio Jiménez onboardJUMENEZ with 170 pts and third was Francisco Pérez skippering ELEANORRYGBY scoring 183 pts.

    The Chilean J/70 class begins their Spring series on September 8th and9th with one regatta per month until the middle of December (when theSummer Series commences). Twenty boats are expected for the Springseries.

    In the meantime, three teams are preparing to sail the 2018 J/70 WorldChampionship in Marblehead, MA (Boston)- WINDMADE, TSUNAMI, and BLACKSAILS. Add to Flipboard Magazine.

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Sailing for Life in Better Sailboats

Sailing is the ultimate freedom, the experience of being at one with nature and the sea, powered only by the wind and one's imagination. It's one of the few "life sports" that offers both a relaxing escape as well as an invigorating challenge. You pick your level of comfort and excitement. Sailing is never the same twice - each time on the water with your sailboat is a unique adventure that can enrich friendships, strengthen family ties, and refresh one's own sense of well-being. How many other outdoor activities can be shared with three or more family generations?  It's been said there are two types of sailors in the world - the young and the young-at-heart.

What a Difference a J Makes

Fulfilling those sailing dreams starts with finding a sailboat that fits you - whether you aspire to sail close to home, cruise to distant shores, or take up the challenge of competitive sailing. Performance differences between sailboats are greater than differences between golf clubs, tennis rackets, skis or cars. A well-designed sailboat, like a good sports car, is an extension of its owner. It could take years of sailing other boats to learn the difference that good design and quality make to one's sailing enjoyment. Or, you can save time and take advantage of what we've designed into every "J."

NEW 40' Offshore Speedster for 5 or fewer Crew

J/121 offshore speedster sailing off Newport The new J/121 is a 40’ offshore speedster that can be day raced or distance sailed by just 5 or fewer crew…. the best short-handed J ever…. capable of winning on any race track while also excelling in daysailing and weekend mode. J/121 redefines offshore sailboat racing as a recreation and shared adventure with friends - fulfilling the growing need to simplify life and reconnect with those you really want to sail with on a boat that’s pure magic to sail. Learn more about J/121 here.

Elegance, Comfort & Style - NEW J/112E

J112E 01 19986J/112E is the newest “E” Series of sport-cruising yachts.  An Evolution of Elegant performance cruising design. This dual- purpose 36 footer has a spacious two-cabin layout and a roomy, comfortable,  cockpit.  Perfect for the annual club cruise, offshore racing or short-handed blue-water sailing.  Learn about J/112E here.

A Family-friendly One-Design & Daysailer - J/88

J88 SolarSailer cockpit 001 18209The J/88 combines big boat feel with sportsboat-like acceleration.  Add a weekend interior, inboard head, engine and huge cockpit and you have a versatile 29 footer.  Blistering upwind speed of 6.5 kts and trailblazing speed offshore means smiles all around as you collect both the silverware and priceless sailing memories. Learn more about J/88 here.

J/70 - The Sportboat Changing Sailing

J70 spin08 redThe J/70 speedster is a fun, fast, stable, 22 footer that can be towed behind a small SUV and ramped launched and rigged by two people.  J/70 sails upwind like her larger sibling (the J/80) and off the wind she simply flies - planing fast in moderate winds. With 1,300+ boats delivered worldwide, the choice is clear. Learn more about J/70 here.

J/Sailing Gear For 2018

JGear marquee 2018Look great this season in J sailing apparel. Check out the comfortable and fashionable sailing clothing, tech shirts, polo shirts, sailing jackets and sailing hats at the J/Sailing Gear site. Also backpacks, totes, J battleflags and other fun items like half-model sailboats are available as gifts and trophies. 

J/Gear is fully customizable to your needs.  When you order, you can specify just about anything you wish, including boat name, boat type, yacht club, hailing port, etc.  Please be sure to visit our store here.

Upcoming Sailing Events

Jul 12-15- Italian J/70 Cup- Malcesine, Italy
Jul 12-14- Canadian J/70 Nationals- Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
Jul 12-20- Offshore Sailing Worlds- The Hague, The Netherlands
Jul 12-15- Vineyard Cup- Vineyard Haven, Martha’s Vineyard, MA
Jul 13- Lake Ontario 300 Challenge Race- Port Credit, ONT, Canada
Jul 13- RORC Cowes-Dinard-St Malo Race- St Malo, France
Jul 14- Belles Beer Bayview Mackinac Race- Port Huron, MI
Jul 16-21- New York YC Race Week- Newport, RI
Jul 19-20- Edgartown Race Week- Edgartown, Martha’s Vineyard, MA
Jul 19-22- Whidbey Island Race Week- Whidbey Island, WA
Jul 20-29- Travemunde Race Weke- Travemunde, Germany
Jul 21- Chicago to Mackinac Race- Chicago, IL
Jul 21- Edgartown Round Island Race- Edgartown, Martha’s Vineyard, MA
Jul 21-22- Fiesta Cup- Santa Barbara, CA

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