J133

   
Dimensions ft/lb   m/kg
LOA 43.00   13.11
LWL 37.80   11.52
Beam 12.78   3.90
Standard Draft 7.50   2.29
Standard Ballast 7,300   3,311
Displacement 17,900   8,119
Engine 56 hp   56 hp
100% SA 964   89.60
I 57.00   17.37
ISP 60.40   18.41
J 17.25   5.26
P 54.00   16.46
E 18.60   5.67
SA/Dspl 23   23
Dspl/L 145   145
     
     

Hull & Deck Construction

  • The hull and deck are laminated with high quality materials : Sandwich construction using uni-and multi-directional glass, low density balsa core, vinylester resin and the “SCRIMP” patented resin infusion process, providing an anti-osmosis warranty of 10 years and a structural warranty of 5 years.
  • White gelcoat hull finish with integrated gelcoat double boot stripe.
  • Off-white deck with optional choice of 2 non-skid colors.
  • Hull-to-deck joint is bonded with a methacrylate structural adhesive.
  • Transverse/longitudinal grids and mast step are infused as part of the hull moulding.
  • SCRIMP infusion moulded, main bulkhead.
  • All intermediate bulkheads are glassed to hull and deck for strength and stiffness.
  • ORC legal foredeck toe rails are an integral part of the deck moulding.
  • Large capacity self draining foredeck chain locker, with space for optional electric anchor windlass.
  • 2 side lockers in cockpit for storage of life-rafts.
  • 2 aft lazarette lockers.
  • 1 gas bottle locker, self draining with space for 2 bottles.
  • Instrument pod on the sliding hatch w/ integrated mountings for sprayhood attachment.
  • Transom platform with removable swimming ladder.

Keel & Rudder

  • Low VCG lead keel (2.29 m draft), bolted and epoxy bonded to molded sump.
  • Balanced, high aspect composite rudder using uni and multi-directional glass.
  • Carbon fiber pre-preg rudder shaft.
  • Self-aligning bearings.
  • Aluminium steering wheel (5.26’), leather covered, on custom moulded pedestal, with well and drain.
  • Compass on wheel pedestal with s/s protection bar.
  • Emergency tiller.

Spars & Rigging

  • White painted Hall Spars carbon mast (pre-impregnated-autoclaved), 2 sets of spreaders, with
  • mainsail track.
  • White painted aluminium boom, with 12:1 outhaul purchase system, mainsail reef lines sheaves,
  • internal mainsheet anchorage point and forward articulated blocks to deck.
  • Mast deck ring with custom moulded resin wedge, adjustable mast step.
  • Discontinuous rod rigging (Nitronic 50).
  • Hydraulic backstay adjuster.
  • Harken Unit 2.0 genoa furling system.
  • Retractable carbon bowsprit with adjustable watertight system.
  • Rigid boomvang with integral purchase system for a final ratio of 30:1.
  • Complete running rigging package

Deck Hardware

  • 2 two speed self-tailing primary winches
  • 2 two speed self-tailing mainsheet winches
  • 2 two speed self-tailing secondary winches on aft end of coach roof
  • 4 lock-in winch handles, including 2 of “Speed grip” type
  • 4 winch handle holders
  • Belowdecks mainsheet system on 2:1 blocks, led forward through boom, then down to sidedecks, then aft under deck to cockpit winches.
  • Adjustable mainsheet traveler with 4:1 purchase led to both sides of the cockpit.
  • Full length genoa tracks, with ball-bearing car system and adjustable purchase, adjusted from the cockpit.
  • 2 footblocks for genoa sheets.
  • Spinnaker sheet blocks mounted on through deck u-bolts.
  • Halyard & reef turning blocks.
  • Deck organizers to lead halyards and reef lines aft.
  • Rope clutches on each side of companionway.
  • Rope clutch on sides of coach roof.
  • Bowsprit control line led to cockpit.
  • 2 forward mooring cleats
  • 2 aft mooring cleats
  • Custom SS stemhead fitting with tack fitting and attachment studs for bow roller.
  • SS chainplates for shrouds and backstay.
  • 1 foredeck opening hatch (600 x 600 mm) with vent.
  • Opening skylight hatches & portlights distributed in head, forward, main & aft cabins.
  • 4 mesh line bags
  • Large companionway spray hood with removable sides and opening front (choose from a selection of colors).
  • SS handrails on top of coach roof.
  • Double SS rail pulpit and pushpit.
  • All around stainless lifelines, 10 stanchions including 6 with reinforcing leg.
  • Acrylic companionway wash board with lock and vent.
  • Flagstaff holder

Auxiliary Power

  • Inboard 55 HP Saildrive diesel engine, 115 AH alternator, with double diode and fresh water-cooling with heat exchanger.
  • Engine control panel recessed in cockpit, with plexiglass protection, including rev. counter, hour meter and alarms for oil pressure, low voltage and water temperature.
  • 45 gallon fuel tank
  • Sound insulated engine compartment, ventilation pipes to the transom.
  • Two-blade folding propeller
Systems
  • Manual bilge pump in cockpit
  • Electric bilge pump with switch from automatic to manual functioning with control and individual warning light.
  • Shower drain pump with filter.
  • Pressurized water system.
  • 2 SS water tanks (total 90 gallons) under main cabin settees
  • Icebox drain.
  • 6 gallon calorifier.
  • Marine toilet
  • 2 x 115 AH batteries & 1 x 70 AH battery for engine, with switches. The batteries are charged by either the engine or the battery charger.
  • 12V electrical panel, with fuel gauge, voltmeter and ammeter.
  • 110V electrical panel, with circuit breaker
  • Halogen lights on ceilings and swiveling tulip lights in cabins.
  • Ceiling light in heads
  • Navigation lights on pushpit and pulpit, steaming light and mooring light.
  • Rig grounded for protection against lightning
  • Battery charger
  • 110V Shorepower
Interior
  • Built using wood, laminated or solid. All wooden parts are varnished or laminated with white formica.
  • Floors are in plywood laminated with teak and holly effect.
  • Vinyl lining or varnished wood hull linings.

FORWARD CABIN

  • Access door to heads, large hanging locker, desk with storage above and below.
  • Large double berth with lockers below.
  • Locker and bookshelf on starboard side.
  • Shelf above berth on port side.
  • Access door to main cabin and forward heads.

FORWARD HEAD

  • Access door to main and forward cabins.
  • Lower part integrally moulded for easier maintenance, with integral shower tray, sink with access
  • below to seacocks, toilet roll holder.
  • Sink is recessed in synthetic resin colored worktop, with rail for hand towel.
  • Shower with pressurized hot and cold water.
  • Marine WC
  • Electric shower drain pump.
  • Shelf along the hull side with mirror.
  • Shower grating

AFT CABINS (Port & Starboard)

  • Access door to main cabin
  • Large hanging locker
  • Locker with doors, storage below and above.
  • Changing seat
  • Shelf along the hull side
  • Large double berth
  • Access door to engine
  • Fuel tank under Starboard berth

CHART TABLE (to port)

  • Large chart table facing forward.
  • Chart storage under table lid & pencil box.
  • Locker under chart table
  • Bookshelf
  • Large hinged instrument panel with electric display, 12V 18 functions - voltmeter – ampmeter.
  • Navigator’s seat with storage below.
  • Large wet hanging locker with drain behind the seat.
  • MAIN CABIN
  • Settee/berths to port and starboard.
  • Drop leaf table with cold moulded fiddles, bottle storage in centre fixed part.
  • Large storage lockers behind backrests.
  • Water tanks under seats
  • S/s handrail on ceiling
  • Lockers/bookshelves on each side.

U-SHAPED GALLEY (to starboard)

  • Gimballed gas stove with oven and 3 burners, with s/s protection bar.
  • Double s/s sink unit recessed in synthetic resin worktop.
  • Pressurized hot and cold water.
  • Large 6.4 cu/ft moulded icebox/fridge, with double access, divider and storage shelf.
  • 4 utensils drawers
  • Bottles drawer
  • Large storage under drawers
  • Storage under sink with shelf
  • Trash bin with direct access from worktop
  • Full length locker outboard of galley worktop with crockery storage system.
  • Cold moulded fiddle around the edge of the worktop with integrated handrail.

COMPANIONWAY

  • White Formica finish for better wear resistance.
  • Open fronted locker for storage of deck gear.
  • Steps with angled treads between bulkheads.
  • Handrails integrated in bulkheads.
  • Main engine access through removable panel.
Notice

Specifications are subject to change prior to delivery due to deletion, additions or revisions in quantities, brand or design at the sole discretion of J/Boats, Inc. Newport, RI.

J133_fr_cabin

The J/133 is one of the best mid-40s racer-cruisers on the market.  Fast, diverse, easily handled by full race crew or short-handed by a couple.  Below are different perspectives from professional boat reviewers on what makes the J/133 an excellent sailboat and an excellent investment for you and your family as a cruising sailboat, racing sailboat, or extraordinary weekend day-sailer!

SAILING WORLD

"The J/133: A Breeze to Sail"
By Chuck Allen

The new 43-footer from J/Boats is quite simply a breeze to sail. We tested the J/133 in 15 knots of wind with six people on board and were able to handle it with ease. From sailing upwind, fully hiked, to pulling off a bunch of jibes in a row, we never missed a beat.

The first thing that pops out when stepping aboard the J/133 is the deck layout. You expect a 43-footer to have lines running all over, but the 133 has has the simplest of plans; the two halyard winches are forward, just aft of the mast, and their placement makes a ton of sense. No lines for the crew to trip on when crossing the cabin house from side to side, a nice feature. There’s plenty of room to walk around the shrouds while heading to the bow for takedowns, jibes or anchoring.

READ MORE OF SAILING WORLD'S J/133 REVIEW HERE. 

YACHTS & YACHTING

"Review of the J/133"
By Louay Habib

Quite frankly this yacht has got success written all over it and with a carbon mast and rudder as standard it is very competitively priced.

This performance cruiser has been extremely well thought out and not surprisingly fifteen have already been sold in Europe, nine of which will be racing in UK waters this coming season.

After its early success in the States winning class at the 2004 Key West Race week, the J133 has already been in the chocolates in the UK and Ireland with Class wins at Cork week (WOW!) and the Tyco Hamble Winter series (JUMP).

READ MORE OF YACHTS & YACHTING'S J/133 REVIEW HERE

BLUE WATER SAILING

"J/133 Offshore Review"
By Simon Day

The J/133 achieves the magic combination of terrific sailing qualities with accommodations a cruising family will love.

Jim Johnstone cut off in mid-anecdote about his years crewing on the classic J Class Shamrock IV. “Simon, ease the main! Ease! Ease! Ease!” he said with an urgency that only comes when racing or something bad is going to happen.

The stern of the new J/133 lifted on the crest of an eight-foot wave, and we took off. I put the handle in the self-tailing mainsheet winch and cranked the sheet in as fast as I could.

“Simon, look at the speed.” It went past 10.5, then to 12 knots, and kept going until it hit 14.5 and stayed there for 30 seconds before the wave we were surfing finally passed us. We were close reaching under a single-reefed main in 25 to 30 knots of breeze as we entered The Race at the eastern end of Long Island Sound. 

READ MORE OF BLUE WATER SAILING'S J/133 REVIEW HERE.

CRUISING WORLD

"J/133: J Is for Juice"
By Ralph Naranjo- CW's Technical Editor

In setting the pace for the current crop of racer/cruisers, the J/133 assigns a high priority to speed.

By the time the spray had settled in the wake of the 2004 Boat of the Year contest, it was clear to me that among the growing fleet of sailboats being offered for the dual purposes of racing and cruising, the J/133 was definitely the showstopper. Even though I spend much more time cruising than racing, I like boats that are meant to sail efficiently, and I found in the J/133, a big sister to the popular J/105, technology and simplicity elegantly blended in pursuit of harnessing a breeze.

The J/133 is light and responsive. It has a fine entry, a flat canoe body, and modest beam that trims down to an even leaner waterplane. The well-matched bulb keel and spade rudder deliver forgiving steering characteristics as well as surprising tracking ability for appendages with such high-aspect ratios. Even as we noticed some binding in the rudderstock bearing on the prototype boat, the J/Boat team was already in the process of fixing the problem.

READ MORE OF CRUISING WORLD'S J/133 REVIEW HERE.

J133 Key West 05 906

The J/133: A Breeze to Sail

The J/133 is Sailing World's Overall Boat of the Year 2004

November 7, 2003- by Chuck Allen

The new 43-footer from J/Boats is quite simply a breeze to sail. We tested the J/133 in 15 knots of wind with six people on board and were able to handle it with ease. From sailing upwind, fully hiked, to pulling off a bunch of jibes in a row, we never missed a beat.

The first thing that pops out when stepping aboard the J/133 is the deck layout. You expect a 43-footer to have lines running all over, but the 133 has has the simplest of plans; the two halyard winches are forward, just aft of the mast, and their placement makes a ton of sense. No lines for the crew to trip on when crossing the cabin house from side to side, a nice feature. There’s plenty of room to walk around the shrouds while heading to the bow for takedowns, jibes or anchoring. The cockpit seems a little small when you first see it, but after going through the full workout, we discovered that it’s quite accommodating. The only things not high on my list were that the wheel was a touch undersized when standing up to drive, and the mainsheet sometimes hung up on its winches through jibes—but they’re in the perfect location for short-handed sailing (the driver can steer from a sitting position and trim the main at the same time). Overall the cockpit is set up nicely for crossover spin sheets and cross sheeting if you need to do this while racing; everything seems to be led cleanly.

Need to get below quickly? It’s not a problem; the companionway is the best of all the boats that we reviewed. The J/133 has a sturdy and safe platform to operate on; you have the room to maneuver yet there’s a feeling of security while heeling over under sail. Down below your eyes are drawn to the cherry wood throughout the cabin, which has a nice finish. The J-shaped galley to starboard and the nav station to port both have ideal setups for offshore sailing-whether you’re racing to Bermuda or cruising to Maine. There’s plenty of room for entertaining and dozing off. The interior of the J/133 is a 9 out of 10, but could be more up to speed in the areas of light fixtures and the electrical panel—areas where the European boats we reviewed have some really cool products installed.   

 

Sailing the J/133 is easy and a ton of fun. I always start off boat tests with the stop-and-go drill, to see how the boat will handle in a starting-line scenario. It wasn’t a problem to go from full speed to a complete stop, holding in the luffing position for a while, sheeting in and getting up to full speed again. The 133 has remarkable acceleration for a boat of its size, and great feel. Upwind is much the same, we had it locked in at 7.6 to 7.9 knots upwind, and you had to really work to get it to fall out of the groove. The rudder never really stalled out, even when bearing off sheeted in with 15 knots-this is a good thing. The 133 has real nice follow through while tacking, getting back up to targets in just seconds, critical if you have one of those "must tack two to three times off the line" bad starts. I like to run the 360 degree turn maneuver to simulate hitting a mark, the 133 cut the mustard by turning inside itself, meaning within a boat-length.

Downwind is even better than upwind— the kite is huge. It takes a while to ring the bell (get the sail fully hoisted) but when you do, look out! The kite fills and the boat takes off, jumping into the 10- to 12-knot range quickly. It has a nice groove to drive to, with the speeds holding steady, and will definitely surf in waves, which well help you obtain the "go low" numbers we all look for when driving down with asymmetric spinnakers. Jibing may be trickier than the hoist, as with all asymmetric spinnaker boats. During our test sail, we were able to pull off jibes with ease; but as on any asym boat this will be the maneuver you’ll need to practice the most, besides the takedown.

The J/133 is my pick for the 2004 Sailing World BOTY. It seems a bit on the pricey side, but considering what you get it really isn’t: Hall Spars carbon mast and bowsprit, North 3DL sails, asymmetric spinnakers, and the well known J Boats Customer Service Policy. This boat seems like a perfect step-up boat for those J/105 and J/109 owners already in the family.

J133 reach

YACHTS & YACHTING- Review of the J/133

By Louay Habib

Quite frankly this yacht has got success written all over it and at £250,000 including vat* with a carbon mast and rudder as standard it is very competitively priced.

This performance cruiser has been extremely well thought out and not surprisingly fifteen have already been sold in Europe, nine of which will be racing in UK waters this coming season.

After its early success in the States winning class at the 2004 Key West Race week, the J133 has already been in the chocolates in the UK and Ireland with Class wins at Cork week (WOW!) and the Tyco Hamble Winter series (JUMP).

One of the new J133’s that will be making its debut at Spi Ouest this spring is Jonathan Goring’s JERONIMO. Goring was part of the victorious England Red Team that won the 2004 Rolex Commodores Cup in his J109.

Bangthecorner.com contacted Jonathan and asked about his plans for the new Jeronimo and why he decided to purchase a J133.

“To be honest with you I really did not take much of a glance elsewhere when I decided to buy the J133, my previous Jeronimo (J109) was also the works boat from Didier Le Maol and he did such a fantastic job on her that I have every faith in him coming up trumps with the J133

Also with yacht designs getting faster and faster the amount of apparent wind created downwind is becoming something that is incredibly important to harness, with a bow-sprit configuration you don’t just get easier sail handling you also have a set up that is very efficient downwind, in particular reaching.

Whilst Jeronimo will be doing some serious inshore racing the real goal for next season is the Rolex Fastnet, The J133 is in my opinion an excellent design for both inshore racing and offshore, it really is a good all rounder, a true racer-cruiser.

She really is the big sister of the J109 and I am confident that she will deliver as good results, I am not just looking towards next season but also towards the 2006 Rolex Commodores Cup”

I have to say that the J133 is very impressive, she already has a good track record of winning and to put it politically correct seems to race well to her IRC handicap.

 

But what really impressed me about the yacht was the thought that has gone into the interior, something that usually does not get me excited.

There are three equally proportioned cabins, two aft and one forepeak, they are all genuine one level doubles allowing six adults to sleep at anyone time, as the IRC rating allows for up to 14 crew there is plenty of room for off-watch R and R and from the point of view of cruising or chartering there are three decent cabins, no arguments about who gets the ‘wet cramped cupboard’ because there isn’t one and there is good headroom throughout.

The design below is also clever in so much as certain ideas have been incorporated giving the space functionality without adding to the build cost.

A chrome pipe strengthening the pole sleeve is in the forepeak but it also acts as a place to hang lines when they are not being used.

The floorboards have streamline catches that you can open without reaching for the toolbox or losing several fingernails.

The galley has a neat way of providing a means of storing your rubbish that actually works but cost no more to install than the thought put into it.

On deck, the mast and rudder are carbon as standard, something you will see as an extra on many other yachts of this size. The weight saving aloft and stiffness of rig makes a real improvement in performance without unduly affecting its IRC rating and the huge amount of weight saving with a carbon rudder means the J133 will get its backside out of the water and really cream downhill.

There is also an option of having the jammers and halyard winches located near the base of the mast, meaning the pitman can do his stuff away from the crowded cockpit area with a far greater purchase and virtually from the rail. No more flying elbows in the cockpit on hoists.

On the racing side of it maybe the J133 has one chink in its armour and that is the fact that it will be racing in the UK near the bottom of class zero under IRC. This may be mean a disadvantage in races favouring bigger boats in the same class but apart from that, I reckon that the J133 will be picking up quite a bit of silverware in 2005 and beyond.

J133 upwind08

BLUE WATER SAILING- Review of the J/133

By Simon Day

The J/133 achieves the magic combination of terrific sailing qualities with accommodations a cruising family will love.

Jim Johnstone cut off in mid-anecdote about his years crewing on the classic J Class Shamrock IV. “Simon, ease the main! Ease! Ease! Ease!” he said with an urgency that only comes when racing or something bad is going to happen.

The stern of the new J/133 lifted on the crest of an eight-foot wave, and we took off. I put the handle in the self-tailing mainsheet winch and cranked the sheet in as fast as I could.

“Simon, look at the speed.” It went past 10.5, then to 12 knots, and kept going until it hit 14.5 and stayed there for 30 seconds before the wave we were surfing finally passed us. We were close reaching under a single-reefed main in 25 to 30 knots of breeze as we entered The Race at the eastern end of Long Island Sound. The outgoing current had kicked the seas up from regular four-footers to very steep eight- to 10-footers with no backs to them. We caught two more and had sleigh rides up to 16 knots. Within a mile we were inside Long Island Sound and the seas had subsided to two- to four-foot chop, and we had huge grins across our faces.

The J/133 is the latest incarnation of J/Boats’ extremely successful Sprit boat line. Building on the proven concept of boats like the J/105, the company has come out with their next generation of racer/cruisers. Along with her little sister the 109, the 133 is a boat that is designed to win the Tuesday night racing series and then on Friday take the family cruising for a long weekend.

I sailed the boat from Newport, R.I., to New York City in late September with Jim Johnstone, who is a member of the founding family, the New England regional sales manager and the man in charge of overseeing building at TPI in Bristol, R.I. And we got pasted with the first real fall low-pressure system.

SAILING AND CHARACTERISTICS
The 133 is a sailor’s boat. Everything about it is geared toward having fun and sailing fast. The boat is built using their patented Scrimp technology. The fiberglass hull and deck are laminated of E-glass over a balsa core. TPI gives their boats a five-year structural warranty and a 10-year warranty against blisters.

At 17,900 pounds the 133 is light for a 43-footer. The simple double-swept spreader rig comes standard in carbon fiber from Hall Spars. The sail plan consists of a large fully battened mainsail with a fractional 100- percent jib and asymmetrical spinnakers set off the retractable carbon fiber bowsprit. The rig allows the boat to stay powered up in a very wide range of conditions and is easily handled by a small number of crew. This boat had a brand new set of North 3DL sails that certainly helped her performance.

As we left Newport and Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay, the wind was blowing from the east at 14 knots and building. Jim and I were stoked at the prospect of a blistering broad reach down the sound. There was even talk of spinnakers. Powering toward Pt. Judith at the southern end of Rhode Island Sound the boat trucked along at a steady 7.5 knots with water pluming up over the nearly plumb bow. The helm felt balanced the entire time, and the boat responded like a sports car to the smallest adjustment. Initially, I found myself oversteering because I am used to much heavier boats with less efficient rudders.

By the time we rounded Pt. Judith and turned toward The Race and Long Island Sound, the wind had clocked to the south-southwest and had built to a steady 18 with gusts up to 20. Close reaching with just a single reef in the main we made eight, but when the boat was cracked off 10 degrees she really showed her speed potential with regular surges above 10. In these conditions the motion of the boat was very manageable thanks to her seven-foot, six-inch draft and full waterline length. We stopped for the night at a marina along the Connecticut shore.

The next day brought sun and warmth and a five- to 10-knot breeze directly from the west-southwest, our exact course to New York. We sailed for an hour or so in the morning. The boat showed that it is capable in the lightest airs to make a good turn of speed. In six knots of true wind we had the boat going four and a half to five knots at 35 degrees apparent. Not bad.

But that speed wasn’t going to get us to Hell’s Gate before dark, so on went the 56-horsepower Yanmar and we motored at 3,000 rpms at 7.7 knots all day. Unfortunately, the wind didn’t cooperate, and we motored until New York. At 8 p.m. that night we entered the East River with New York ablaze in front of us. And by 10 we were tied to the dock in Liberty Landing Marina on the New Jersey shore across from Manhattan.

COCKPIT AND ACCOMMODATIONS
The clean and open cockpit with a full-width wheel and wide decks reflect the boat’s racing pedigree. All lines, save the spinnaker controls, are led aft to ease handling. There is also the option of moving the asymmetrical spinnaker pole lines and halyards to jammers in the cockpit for shorthanded sailing.

 

The mainsheet runs along a full-width traveler to winches just in front of the helmsman. Two able sailors can handle the 133 quite easily and one can manage all working sail if the autopilot takes over the steering. For watchkeepers on passage, all lines are handy so there is rarely a need to leave the cockpit.

Visibility is good when standing behind the wheel, and the helmsman can get comfortable sitting either to windward or to leeward to watch sail trim. With the dodger raised it is a little more difficult looking forward, but the dodger keeps the water out of what was otherwise a wet cockpit in the boisterous conditions we were sailing through. In these conditions, with the dodger down, we were getting continual water running down the decks and then over the backs of the seats and into the cockpit. The cockpit seats are long and wide enough to nap on but the seat backs are quite low.

The huge lockers are the best part of the cockpit. Under the starboard seat is a good shallow locker designed for extra lines and sail ties and under the port seat lies a massive storage bin. Through the bin there is access to the large space underneath the cockpit floor, an area intended for a generator or more storage. The two large lazarette lockers house the propane tanks and offer excellent access to the steering system.

The boat comes with standard Harken 58s as primary winches and two 48s for the mainsheet forward of the helm. There are two more 48s at the companionway with the standard Spinlock line clutches.

Expecting the 133 to be fairly stripped out below to meet the requirements of the racing crowd, the aspect of the new 133 that most surprised and impressed me was the interior. The boat Jim and I sailed to New York was the twin-cabin version with a master cabin forward with its own head and a quarter cabin aft of the galley. To port of the companionway is a large head with a great wet locker behind the toilet. Forward of the head on the port side is a very workable nav station. The chart table is large enough for a full-size chart folded in half. All electrics are led through the master panel at the chart table, and there is plenty of space to mount a chartplotter and all the other goodies one could hope to weigh oneself down with. This boat was equipped with B&G Hercules instruments and GPS.

The J-shaped galley is easy to work in underway. During our pound toward Long Island Sound I was able to fix sandwiches without a problem. The fiddles throughout the boat are quite large and sturdy and offer good handholds. The galley comes equipped with two large stainless steel sinks almost on the centerline (so they will drain on both tacks), six-and-a-half cubic feet of fridge space that is easy to access and a large three-burner stove. Storage areas in the cabinets and behind the fridge and stove are ample for a week’s cruise or more. Long-term stores can be tucked away behind the saloon seats and in the forward cabin.

The main saloon is dominated visually by the black carbon mast that comes down through the forward part of the folding table. The benches are long enough to easily sit six people for dinner and make great sea births. Under them are the 50-gallon fuel and water tanks. These are on the small side and reflect the boat’s racing pedigree. But behind the benches there is loads of storage space.

Up forward, the big white tube that houses the spinnaker pole over the starboard side of the V-berth is a little disconcerting at first. But the cabin is large and the pole does not inhibit the bunk.

It is a rare pleasure to find an interior on a modern racer/cruiser that does not feel like the designer crammed as much in as possible. It is well thought out throughout, airy and light, and has plenty of storage.

BWS CONCLUSIONS
J/Boats has built some of the most successful production boats of all time. In the 25 years since the Johnstone family introduced the J/24, the sailing world has gone through some tremendous technological changes and with the boats such as the 105, 120 and now the 109 and 133, J/Boats has proven to be right on the leading edge of the sailing world.

The Johnstones create boats that are well built, well thought out and fun. They use their quarter century of knowledge to the maximum in their new range. I was impressed during our two-day, 150-mile sea trial, with how Jim Johnstone constantly made notes on how to improve their new boat. Everything from foot braces in the nav station to better handholds at the mast will be scrutinized and improved upon as 133s roll off the production line and in new models to come.

If you are looking for a cruising boat that is a pleasure to sail and will get your heart pumping occasionally, this boat is for you. Just as important, if you are looking for a boat in which the whole family can have fun and cruise in comfort, the 133 is large enough and commodious enough to make an excellent floating home away from home.

Sailing for Life in Better Sailboats

Sailing is the ultimate freedom, the experience of being at one with nature and the sea, powered only by the wind and one's imagination. It's one of the few "life sports" that offers both a relaxing escape as well as an invigorating challenge. You pick your level of comfort and excitement. Sailing is never the same twice - each time on the water with your sailboat is a unique adventure that can enrich friendships, strengthen family ties, and refresh one's own sense of well-being. How many other outdoor activities can be shared with three or more family generations?  It's been said there are two types of sailors in the world - the young and the young-at-heart. How great is that?

What a Difference a J Makes

Fulfilling those sailing dreams starts with finding a sailboat that fits you - whether you aspire to sail close to home, cruise to distant shores, or take up the challenge of competitive sailing. Performance differences between sailboats are greater than differences between golf clubs, tennis rackets, skis or cars. There aren't many wooden or metal tennis rackets, skis or golf clubs in use anymore. That's because newer boat designs that perform better and are easier to use are MORE FUN!  A well designed sailboat, like a good sports car, is an extension of its owner. It could take years of sailing other boats to learn the difference that good design and quality make to one's sailing enjoyment. Or you can save time and take advantage of what we've learned and designed into every "J." We invite you to explore our site to learn more.

J/Sailing Gear For 2017

JGear 250pxLook great this season in J sailing apparel. Check out the comfortable and fashionable sailing clothing, tech shirts, polo shirts, sailing jackets and sailing hats at the J/Sailing Gear site. Also backpacks, totes, J battleflags and other fun items like half-model sailboats are available as gifts and trophies. 

J/Gear is fully customizable to your needs.  When you order, you can specify just about anything you wish, including boat name, boat type, yacht club, hailing port, etc.  Please be sure to visit our store here.

Upcoming Sailing Events

Sep 30- Nov 26- Hamble Winter Series- Hamble, England
Dec 2- Hot Rum Series III- San Diego, CA
Dec 9-10- Jammin Jamaica J/22 Regatta- Montego Bay, Jamaica
Dec 8-10- Quantum J/70 Winter Series- Tampa, FL
Jan 5-7- Quantum J/70 Winter Series- Tampa, FL
Jan 19-21- J/Fest St Pete- St Petersburg, FL
Feb 9-11- Quantum J/70 Winter Series- Tampa, FL
Feb 15-18- St Pete NOOD Regatta- St Petersburg, FL
Feb 17-18- SCYA Midwinter Regatta- Long Beach, CA
Feb 19- RORC Caribbean 600 Race- English Harbour, Antigua
Feb 23-25- J/70 Midwinters- Coconut Grove, FL
Mar 1-4- Heineken St Maarten Regatta- Simpson Bay, St Maarten
Mar 7-10- Bacardi Cup J/70 Invitational- Coconut Grove, FL
Mar 16-18- San Diego NOOD Regatta- San Diego, CA

NEW 40' Offshore Speedster for 5 or fewer Crew

J/121 offshore speedster sailing off Newport The new J/121 is a 40’ offshore speedster that can be day raced or distance sailed by just 5 or fewer crew…. the best short-handed J ever…. capable of winning on any race track while also excelling in daysailing and weekend mode. J/121 redefines offshore sailboat racing as a recreation and shared adventure with friends - fulfilling the growing need to simplify life and reconnect with those you really want to sail with on a boat that’s pure magic to sail. Learn more about J/121 here.

Elegance, Comfort & Style - NEW J/112E

J112E 01 19986J/112E is the newest “E” Series of sport-cruising yachts.  An Evolution of Elegant performance cruising design. This dual- purpose 36 footer has a spacious two-cabin layout and a roomy, comfortable,  cockpit.  Perfect for the annual club cruise, offshore racing or short-handed blue-water sailing.  Learn about J/112E here.

J/70 - The Sportboat Changing Sailing

J70 spin08 redThe J/70 speedster is a fun, fast, stable, 22 footer that can be towed behind a small SUV and ramped launched and rigged by two people.  J/70 sails upwind like her larger sibling (the J/80) and off the wind she simply flies - planing fast in moderate winds. With 1,300+ boats delivered worldwide, the choice is clear. Learn more about J/70 here.

A Family-friendly One-Design & Daysailer - J/88

J88 SolarSailer cockpit 001 18209The J/88 combines big boat feel with sportsboat-like acceleration.  Add a weekend interior, inboard head, engine and huge cockpit and you have a versatile 29 footer.  Blistering upwind speed of 6.5 kts and trailblazing speed offshore means smiles all around as you collect both the silverware and priceless sailing memories. Learn more about J/88 here.

J/News Around the World

Better Sailboats for People Who Love Sailing